Date   

Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

Londa,

             Thanks very, very much for this.  Sitting in Outlook right now, the CTRL+SHIFT alone causes no "next step" to reveal itself, and that's very unusual.  Typically I figure out keyboard shortcuts that I seldom or ever use by hitting the control characters one by one, or in a 2-key combination, and see what reveals itself as follow-up keystroke options on the ribbon.

              CTRL+Shift+F brings up precisely what I had hoped I'd be able to bring up, but could not find the way to do it!

Brian


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

HH. Smith Jr.
 

The body is comfortable; however, the heart is watch and praying for the best.
Take care and be very careful

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 4:03 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

Hope you don't lose power with the storm - that's what we're hoping here. My
husband saw on the TV screen: "Winter strom warnings".

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 2:16 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

HH,

I use Legacy form fields rather than Active X ones when designing
forms. That being said, if absolute immobility of items relative to one
another matters, text boxes are a far easier way to get that result than form
fields, though one can use those with some effort. A check-writing template
is probably best accomplished with text boxes if ease of creation is a major
consideration.

I recently had a client who was enrolled in a program that required
her to fill out client information forms, all of which were MS-Word documents,
but none of which utilized true form fields, and were thus completely
inaccessible. I whipped up the same forms using form fields with descriptive
text and help text for each field (most of which she'd probably never need,
but) so that she could either fill the form out herself or be able to easily
zoom through one filled out by someone else to find exactly the piece of
information she was looking for.

Brian, off to tutor yet again (and at least I'm a day ahead of the "Great
Storm" - we're set for a possible 18-24 plus inches of the white stuff)


Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

Londa Peterson
 

Hi Brian, To me, neither of these methods is the simplest. The easiest way to do an advanced search is to press control + shift + F. You can then tab through the fields and fill in the ones you want. Once you press enter or spacebar on find now, you can simply press f6 to get to your list of results. As far as I know, these are all Outlook keystrokes. It's much less cumbersome, and you don't have to be a programming geek to do it.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 5:28 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

I generally prefer to teach keystrokes to access the required ribbon options to accomplish something, but this time I might make an exception.

Once you're in an Outlook folder you wish to search it's a simple matter to hit Ctrl+E to be thrown into the search box.  After that things become much more complicated.

If you want to search on the From field, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+OM, then one types in the partial or full name or e-mail address one wishes to search on.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "from," open parenthesis, the partial or full name or e-mail address, and a close parenthesis directly in the search box to accomplish precisely the same thing.

If you want to get only messages that have attachments, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+H, and that creates a search only for messages that have attachments.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "hasattachments:" followed immediately by either "yes" or "no" and can filter for messages that either do or do not have attachments directly into the search box.

If you want to filter by date, the keystroke sequence is ALT+JS+W, this brings up a drop down menu from which you can choose today, yesterday, this week, last week, this month, last month, this year, or last year.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "received:" followed by one of the previously listed single words or two-word phrases.

All of the above can, of course, be combined together.  There are also additional criteria that can be specified but I'm trying to focus on the most common and useful.

Let's say I'm trying to find an e-mail that I sent, last week, that has an attachment on it.  I can do one of two things after hitting CTRL+E:

1.  Immediately type "from(Brian Vogel) received:last week hasattachments:yes" in the search box by hand.

2.  Hit ALT+JS+OM and immediately type "Brian Vogel," then hit ALT+JS+W and use down arrow to go through the dropdown to find last week, then hit ALT+JS+H

The second option is, to me, much more cumbersome than the first, once you know what the search operator terms and formats are.  In addition, it is only through hand entering "hasattachments:no" that one can limit the search to messages that do not have an attachment, no keystroke sequence generates the "no" condition.

I'm sure that some of you have had to use advanced searching to filter out as much extraneous e-mail in your archives as you possibly can before trying to locate a specific message from the returned results.  What say you regarding whether it makes more sense in this case to focus on the search operators that you type yourself versus the keystrokes and typing involved to do each via the ribbon?

Brian


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Hope you don't lose power with the storm - that's what we're hoping here. My husband saw on the TV screen: "Winter strom warnings".

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 2:16 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

HH,

I use Legacy form fields rather than Active X ones when designing forms. That being said, if absolute immobility of items relative to one another matters, text boxes are a far easier way to get that result than form fields, though one can use those with some effort. A check-writing template is probably best accomplished with text boxes if ease of creation is a major consideration.

I recently had a client who was enrolled in a program that required her to fill out client information forms, all of which were MS-Word documents, but none of which utilized true form fields, and were thus completely inaccessible. I whipped up the same forms using form fields with descriptive text and help text for each field (most of which she'd probably never need, but) so that she could either fill the form out herself or be able to easily zoom through one filled out by someone else to find exactly the piece of information she was looking for.

Brian, off to tutor yet again (and at least I'm a day ahead of the "Great Storm" - we're set for a possible 18-24 plus inches of the white stuff)


Re: Sending screenshots using JAWS

Kimsan <kimsansong@...>
 

So, I have not done this in years, so I forgot. Does it make a sound after you copy it with CTRL c?

 

From: Artur Räpp [mailto:artur1248@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 10:44 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Sending screenshots using JAWS

 

Hello,

 

If you are using Microsoft outlook then you can paste screenshot directly into email body.

That is

Open the program you want, press alt+print screen keystroce for active window or simply print screen for whole screen

Then open a new email in Microsoft Outlooc, move to body and press ctrl+v.

 

If you can send it via Skype then paste the screenshot into chat input box.

 

Artur

 

From: Michael Mote [mailto:miketmote73@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 1:22 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Sending screenshots using JAWS

 

Good evening!  I’m wondering how to send a screen shot using JAWS, or if it’s doable.  I thought there was a way to do it.  I thought you could do it by pressing the print screen key or something like that? 

 

 

 


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

HH. Smith Jr.
 

Thanks for the info. It is about 84 degrees and sunny here in the Virgin Islands. Been there, done that. No more!

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 3:16 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

 

HH,

          I use Legacy form fields rather than Active X ones when designing forms.  That being said, if absolute immobility of items relative to one another matters, text boxes are a far easier way to get that result than form fields, though one can use those with some effort.  A check-writing template is probably best accomplished with text boxes if ease of creation is a major consideration.

          I recently had a client who was enrolled in a program that required her to fill out client information forms, all of which were MS-Word documents, but none of which utilized true form fields, and were thus completely inaccessible.  I whipped up the same forms using form fields with descriptive text and help text for each field (most of which she'd probably never need, but) so that she could either fill the form out herself or be able to easily zoom through one filled out by someone else to find exactly the piece of information she was looking for.

Brian, off to tutor yet again (and at least I'm a day ahead of the "Great Storm" - we're set for a possible 18-24 plus inches of the white stuff)

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

 

HH,

          I use Legacy form fields rather than Active X ones when designing forms.  That being said, if absolute immobility of items relative to one another matters, text boxes are a far easier way to get that result than form fields, though one can use those with some effort.  A check-writing template is probably best accomplished with text boxes if ease of creation is a major consideration.

          I recently had a client who was enrolled in a program that required her to fill out client information forms, all of which were MS-Word documents, but none of which utilized true form fields, and were thus completely inaccessible.  I whipped up the same forms using form fields with descriptive text and help text for each field (most of which she'd probably never need, but) so that she could either fill the form out herself or be able to easily zoom through one filled out by someone else to find exactly the piece of information she was looking for.

Brian, off to tutor yet again (and at least I'm a day ahead of the "Great Storm" - we're set for a possible 18-24 plus inches of the white stuff)


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

HH. Smith Jr.
 

Hi Brian and Carolyn,

 

There is a training exercise on the Freedom Scientific website that will aid in understanding a little bit more in creating accessible forms with JAWS. This was very helpful to me; because I was trying to create forms with the design mode function rather than the legacy and of course I failed until I did this exercise.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:47 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

 

Carolyn,

            You're quite welcome.   One final note:  I would not turn off the line around the respective text boxes until after you've finished with the repeated alignment test prints.  If you do this, and the text box is unfilled, nothing at all prints.  You really want to have the location frames during the trial and error period showing up in print.

Brian

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


Re: Sending screenshots using JAWS

Artur Räpp
 

Hello,

 

If you are using Microsoft outlook then you can paste screenshot directly into email body.

That is

Open the program you want, press alt+print screen keystroce for active window or simply print screen for whole screen

Then open a new email in Microsoft Outlooc, move to body and press ctrl+v.

 

If you can send it via Skype then paste the screenshot into chat input box.

 

Artur

 

From: Michael Mote [mailto:miketmote73@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 1:22 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Sending screenshots using JAWS

 

Good evening!  I’m wondering how to send a screen shot using JAWS, or if it’s doable.  I thought there was a way to do it.  I thought you could do it by pressing the print screen key or something like that? 

 

 

 


Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Your flexibility is to be commended. I say in situations like that, "it makes sense to him/her."

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:50 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

Kimsan,

Believe it or not, I don't think she has any Contacts at all. She's been relying on the "To:" field to pre-populate as she types based upon who has sent her e-mail or, if it's a first time message, manually entering same.

I've briefly discussed using Contacts, which I much prefer especially over time, but it's not something she's wished to pursue. She manages virtually all of her personal name/address/etc. contacts and her calendar via iPhone, not Outlook. That system has been working for her.

When it comes to what I teach, most of it is directly driven by what the client in question wants to accomplish. I will insert certain "suggestions" that I think they had ought to consider, but if they reject a given suggestion, except in the rarest of cases, I simply respect that choice regardless of my personal feelings about the wisdom of it.

Brian


Re: jaws and ueb

 

Kimsan, 

           When I did a DuckDuckGo search on, "What is UEB Braille," a number of sites that show promise for what you're seeking showed up, but I cannot know exactly how the various materials will interact with JAWS without trying it.  The UEB pages at brailleauthority.org, uebonline.org, and the Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, all look like possible places to start.

Brian


Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

Kimsan,

           Believe it or not, I don't think she has any Contacts at all.  She's been relying on the "To:" field to pre-populate as she types based upon who has sent her e-mail or, if it's a first time message, manually entering same.

           I've briefly discussed using Contacts, which I much prefer especially over time, but it's not something she's wished to pursue.  She manages virtually all of her personal name/address/etc. contacts and her calendar via iPhone, not Outlook.  That system has been working for her.

           When it comes to what I teach, most of it is directly driven by what the client in question wants to accomplish.  I will insert certain "suggestions" that I think they had ought to consider, but if they reject a given suggestion, except in the rarest of cases, I simply respect that choice regardless of my personal feelings about the wisdom of it.

Brian


Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

Kimsan <kimsansong@...>
 

No opinion but what about searching for contacts.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 9:40 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

After giving this a lot more thought and consideration I decided that the preferred method in this case would definitely be teaching the search operators.  This client is a reasonably good typist and I think the operators themselves are easier to remember than the keystroke sequences.  This is what I've put in her step-by-step instruction sheet:

Microsoft Outlook

Using Advanced Search features to find specific e-mail messages, step-by-step:

1.     Navigate to the folder in Outlook that you wish to search for specific messages, e.g., inbox, sent, etc.  Make sure you’re in that folder for the correct e-mail account you wish to search, too.

2.     Hit CTRL+E to get yourself in to the search edit box

3.     Type in the following search operators, in whatever combination is appropriate to narrow down the messages returned to as few as possible, but without eliminating messages you might want:

a.     to() – Enter a partial or full name or e-mail address between the parenthesis.  For example, to(britechguy), would return only messages sent to the person with “britechguy” as part of their e-mail address. 

b.     from() – Same as to(), but looks at who the e-mail was from instead.

c.     hasattachments:yes|no – If you enter “yes” after the hasattachments: operator only messages that have attachments will be returned.  If you enter “no” then only messages without attachments will be returned.

d.     subject() – Enter a keyword or several keywords that will be searched for in the Subject of the e-mail.  Only those messages with the keyword(s) in the subject will be returned.

e.     received: - Used to filter messages based on when you received them.  Immediately after the colon on the received: operator you will enter one of the following words or two-word phrases

                                                             i.      today

                                                           ii.      yesterday

                                                        iii.      this week

                                                        iv.      last week

                                                           v.      this month

                                                        vi.      last month

                                                      vii.      this year

                                                   viii.      last year

 


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

OK, thanks, Brian.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 11:47 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

Carolyn,

You're quite welcome. One final note: I would not turn off the line around the respective text boxes until after you've finished with the repeated alignment test prints. If you do this, and the text box is unfilled, nothing at all prints. You really want to have the location frames during the trial and error period showing up in print.

Brian


Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

After giving this a lot more thought and consideration I decided that the preferred method in this case would definitely be teaching the search operators.  This client is a reasonably good typist and I think the operators themselves are easier to remember than the keystroke sequences.  This is what I've put in her step-by-step instruction sheet:

Microsoft Outlook

Using Advanced Search features to find specific e-mail messages, step-by-step:

1.     Navigate to the folder in Outlook that you wish to search for specific messages, e.g., inbox, sent, etc.  Make sure you’re in that folder for the correct e-mail account you wish to search, too.

2.     Hit CTRL+E to get yourself in to the search edit box

3.     Type in the following search operators, in whatever combination is appropriate to narrow down the messages returned to as few as possible, but without eliminating messages you might want:

a.     to() – Enter a partial or full name or e-mail address between the parenthesis.  For example, to(britechguy), would return only messages sent to the person with “britechguy” as part of their e-mail address. 

b.     from() – Same as to(), but looks at who the e-mail was from instead.

c.     hasattachments:yes|no – If you enter “yes” after the hasattachments: operator only messages that have attachments will be returned.  If you enter “no” then only messages without attachments will be returned.

d.     subject() – Enter a keyword or several keywords that will be searched for in the Subject of the e-mail.  Only those messages with the keyword(s) in the subject will be returned.

e.     received: - Used to filter messages based on when you received them.  Immediately after the colon on the received: operator you will enter one of the following words or two-word phrases

                                                             i.      today

                                                           ii.      yesterday

                                                        iii.      this week

                                                        iv.      last week

                                                           v.      this month

                                                        vi.      last month

                                                      vii.      this year

                                                   viii.      last year



Re: Word 2013 formatting.

 

Carolyn,

            You're quite welcome.   One final note:  I would not turn off the line around the respective text boxes until after you've finished with the repeated alignment test prints.  If you do this, and the text box is unfilled, nothing at all prints.  You really want to have the location frames during the trial and error period showing up in print.

Brian


Re: Word 2013 formatting.

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Thank you Brian. We'll see what we can do with this - might be a few days, but I will save this information. Thanks again.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 9:36 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Word 2013 formatting.

Carolyn,

Another option, which is probably simpler, is using text boxes rather than form fields. What I would suggest as a first approach is using text boxes. These behave as though they are "micro documents" within a document itself and do not move if you size them such that what you're going to enter does not exceed the amount of space you've allocated. By that I mean, for instance, if you created a text box that can hold 4 typed characters across in the font and size you're using, if you type a fifth character it expands the text box by creating a "line below" of the same width of the original. In the case of a check template it should be a simple matter to create text boxes that are correctly sized to enter a date, "pay to the order of" name, numerical amount, written amount, and memo.

In MS-Word, the keyboard shortcut for Insert Text Box is ALT+N,X, which then gives you a variety of text box styles to choose from. I would just stick with the default, which is a Simple Text Box. When that box is inserted, it is filled with instructions telling you to type whatever you like and then you can reposition the box anywhere you wish in the document. The ribbon also changes when the text box is selected such that the drawing tools that you can use to do all kinds of additional formatting for a text box is visible. I just hit backspace to delete those instructions then roughly size the text box and drag it to about where I think it needs to be. You can, of course, change the font, point size, etc., as needed inside each and every text box. I honestly can't imagine that one wouldn't need (or at least want) a sighted assistant to help with the initial positioning of the boxes and the repositioning based on what you find when you actually print to see whether or not things align correctly. Of course, if a sighted assistant is doing the setup the Text Box is an item on the Insert Ribbon. The default text box will show an outline square printed around it. If you don't want this, and for a check you would not, then you have to be certain to go into the text box formatting properties and turn the line color property to "no line."

I don't know whether this is of any interest to the rest of the group. I am willing to keep offering assistance with this either here or off-group via e-mail.

Brian


Re: jaws and ueb

Kimsan <kimsansong@...>
 

Thanks everyone!

 

From: Cindy Ray [mailto:cindyray@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 3:49 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Dots 45 followed by j.

Cindy

 

 

 

From: Jeanette McAllister [mailto:jeanette@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 5:17 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

The degrees symbol is dots 45 in the first cell and dots 245 in the second cell.

 

From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:33 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Thanks.

Do you know the degrees symbol by chance?

 

If so, what is it. Smile.

From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 8:05 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Kimsan, I tried to find such a website a month or so ago without success. When I posted a similar query here, Ann Byrne referred me to the National Braille Press, which will send you a free braille booklet showing the changes. You can call or email to order. The website is

www.braille.com

 

 

From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 10:37 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: jaws and ueb

 

Is there a site where I can look up what’s new in UEB and let’s say, if there is, jaws will read the dots like 2356 after what the new sign is?

For the sake of advancing, please don’t reply by just saying “yes”. Lol.

Thanks much.


Re: jaws and ueb

Cindy Ray <cindyray@...>
 

Dots 45 followed by j.

Cindy

 

 

 

From: Jeanette McAllister [mailto:jeanette@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 5:17 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

The degrees symbol is dots 45 in the first cell and dots 245 in the second cell.

 

From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:33 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Thanks.

Do you know the degrees symbol by chance?

 

If so, what is it. Smile.

From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 8:05 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Kimsan, I tried to find such a website a month or so ago without success. When I posted a similar query here, Ann Byrne referred me to the National Braille Press, which will send you a free braille booklet showing the changes. You can call or email to order. The website is

www.braille.com

 

 

From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 10:37 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: jaws and ueb

 

Is there a site where I can look up what’s new in UEB and let’s say, if there is, jaws will read the dots like 2356 after what the new sign is?

For the sake of advancing, please don’t reply by just saying “yes”. Lol.

Thanks much.


Re: jaws and ueb

Jeanette McAllister
 

The degrees symbol is dots 45 in the first cell and dots 245 in the second cell.

 

From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:33 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Thanks.

Do you know the degrees symbol by chance?

 

If so, what is it. Smile.

From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 8:05 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: jaws and ueb

 

Kimsan, I tried to find such a website a month or so ago without success. When I posted a similar query here, Ann Byrne referred me to the National Braille Press, which will send you a free braille booklet showing the changes. You can call or email to order. The website is

www.braille.com

 

 

From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 10:37 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: jaws and ueb

 

Is there a site where I can look up what’s new in UEB and let’s say, if there is, jaws will read the dots like 2356 after what the new sign is?

For the sake of advancing, please don’t reply by just saying “yes”. Lol.

Thanks much.