Date   

moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Albert Cutolo
 

Good afternoon everyone, 

 

After reading all of the back and forth regarding this issue,  I believe that most of the people that are on this list, don’t have received  either the training or have the skill that would be necessary to perform some these tasks.  In most cases where you get some training, you only get those tasks that are necessary too perform a job where you use either word, and some training on how to use email and the  internet.  In other words, for what some of you might have  expertise in, you don’t get computer emersion in.  I applaud those of         you who have the knowledge that you do.   


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Glenn / Lenny
 


My son had a work laptop that got dropped, and the HD was clicking, and not booting, and he needed some info from it.
I would have not tried this, but if the alternative is to lose your data, then what is there to lose by opening the drive.
Data recovery people talk about only opening a drive in a "clean room", which makes sense, but all that gets expensive.
But he opened it and moved the stuck part and put it together and was able to retrieve the data.
Companies will charge you over a thousand bucks for data retrieval, and that was not an option here.
Sometimes people are squeamish about trying to fix something, but again, if the alternative is the trash, then I say give it a try.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 10:15 AM
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

I can say, though, that I am actually heartened that a serious and spontaneous discussion of backup media has occurred, period.

One of the dumbest things that many computer owners continue to persist with is NOT taking regular cyclic backups.  Most of my worst service calls are due to drive failures where no backup, whether just of user data or a full system image, exists.  The last client I had who had a drive failure (with a HDD, in this case, and he kept trying to fire the machine up and could hear it making noise - an absolute no-no) had a drive so badly damaged that even a professional data recovery company could not recover his data (or at least more than 70% of it, which allows the customer to reject the recovery if less than 70%).  He lost years of stuff including digital photos, documents, etc.

Taking full system image backups as well as separate user data backups on a regular, cyclic basis really should be considered a basic task of computer ownership, and both are easy.  Windows 10 has an excellent built-in utility for user data backups, File History (though I tweak the defaults to make it keep far fewer versions of individual files, and for less time prior to the last time the file was updated).  There are myriad options for full system image backups, which have been recently discussed on this very group.

In the end, I care far less about any given user being able to do their own recovery than that they have a backup that someone can do the recovery from.  If you can DIY, that's great, but a very great many individuals can't, nor do they want to.  But taking the backups so that they're available if ever needed is something that the owner or primary user of a given computer should be doing as a matter of course.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated One drive

Cook, Steve
 

How can a person determine how much space is remaining using One Drive.

 

Steve


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

Hi,

Besides RAM, what’s more important for virtual machines is the load on the processor. I myself have configured 4 GB for all my virtual machines out of 16 GB of physical RAM on the computer I’m typing this email. Thankfully UEFI on this system is set to enable hardware-assisted virtualization, and not all vendors enable this feature in firmware. Although binary translation or software-based virtualization may work (and is compatible with older processors), hardware-assisted solutions such as Intel VTX and AMD-V improves virtualization performance significantly, especially for guest operating systems that can detect presence of a hypervisor such as VMware and Hyper-V and can optimize their inner workings. Again not everyone might be using a virtualization solution or need sophisticated hardware if they don’t need this feature (virtualization is useful if you do need to run different operating systems such as older Windows releases (or if you are testing really bleeding-edge code every week) for any reason, especially if a program or two would not work on newer operating systems despite attempts to do so such as compatibility mode).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 10:39 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

On Fri, Apr 16, 2021 at 01:34 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

So it would be nice to have enough RAM to have all them running at one time without rebooting, and simply alt tab between them, which is what I do now with VmWare, but with 8GB of RAM, having even two open at one time slows down my system.

-
Even if you gave each 12 GB of RAM, which would be very generous, the total would be 36 GB.  I'd never even go that high.  I'd be shocked if 16 GB to 24 GB would not be more than sufficient the way that memory management is handled, by all the OSes you name, these days.

64 GB is unlikely to ever be fully exploited, and that's under really, really heavy-duty use.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Thomas N. Chan
 

I will agree with Bryan

Regards,
Thomas N. Chan


On Sat, 17 Apr 2021 at 01:30, Tyler Wood <tcwood12@...> wrote:

Hi,

Yes, definitely a hard drive for my backup medium here.

The 3 2 1 approach is always a good thing – I can, for instance, highly recommend backblaze’s single computer backup service. It has been reliable, accessible, and utterly, wonderfully easy.

thanks

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 12:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

I agree with Brian... :) using a SSD for backup is not a good practice. Like he said hdd's give warnings of failure. But that is rare. I have drives that are creeping up on 10 years old and still work. Although I should probably retire them now that I think of just how old they are getting.

On 4/16/2021 7:40 AM, Alan Lemly wrote:

Richard's statement made me pause too. Conventional hard disk drives have been around since the mid 1980s and have gotten better, more reliable, and less expensive during that time. They are much more reliable as a backup medium as opposed to SSDs which are still evolving and expensive in my opinion.

 

Alan Lemly 

 

with Outlook for iOS


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 8:52:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 09:38 AM, Richard Turner wrote:

I would not put the files I value on an HD drive these days since the price of SSD has come down so far.

-

I really do not understand this statement, and I say that as a professional computer tech.

I personally prefer SSDs for OS drives just due to the speed factor, but definitely not for reliability or recoverability.  All of my personal backup drives are HDDs because they are very reliable (and have been for decades now) and will generally give you lots of warning signs before failure.  SSDs have a tendency to be very much like jump drives, SD cards, and similar in that when they decide to die they just up and die.  And I can definitely say that the cost of data recovery from SSDs (and other similar media) is far more expensive and less certain than HDDs.

I wouldn't even think of using an SSD as my primary backup media.  Until they become far less inclined to sudden death, and until data recovery probability goes way up and costs go way down, I'll use HDDs as backup media.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide

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Brian.
As IT administrator and network engineer , I will never use SSD as backup media. Its fast, no doubt but their lifespan for read and write are far more shorter than normal spinning drives.
For a physical server, its fine. they need speed to read and write. I don't want to get into the topic of enterprise class SSD. Its way too expensive for a consumer would like to pay.
For backup, we either use two type of media.
1. off premise storage which can include physical spinning drives, tapes. We don't use optical drives, relaibility and storage limitations.
2. Cloud storage but we are still paying for someone or AWS or even  azure to host for us. 
3. We use differential or incremental backup to handle huge  databases on our local network off peak time. Once that backup is done, it will be backup or sync off premise.


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

On Fri, Apr 16, 2021 at 01:34 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
So it would be nice to have enough RAM to have all them running at one time without rebooting, and simply alt tab between them, which is what I do now with VmWare, but with 8GB of RAM, having even two open at one time slows down my system.
-
Even if you gave each 12 GB of RAM, which would be very generous, the total would be 36 GB.  I'd never even go that high.  I'd be shocked if 16 GB to 24 GB would not be more than sufficient the way that memory management is handled, by all the OSes you name, these days.

64 GB is unlikely to ever be fully exploited, and that's under really, really heavy-duty use.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

On Fri, Apr 16, 2021 at 01:01 PM, Randy Barnett wrote:
Although I should probably retire them now that I think of just how old they are getting.
-
Age really generally has a lot less to do with it than hours in service or, more precisely, how many times a drive has had to spin up.  The biggest stresses on a HDD occur when it is spinning up from rest.  Once it's up and spinning, it's quite a bit like a gyroscope and it takes minimum effort on the motor to keep it spinning.

Many backup drives get used very seldom, only when backing up, and even if that's twice a month, 24 spin-ups per year is far fewer than many internal drives get from people shutting down (or restarting, sleeping or hibernating) the machine.

If you look at the SMART stats for most backup drives compared to most system drives (or even data drives that are internal and constantly used) most will be proverbial "babes in the woods" even after years of service.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Glenn / Lenny
 


I for one would like to have that much RAM, as I use windows 7, 10, and Linux, of different versions.
So it would be nice to have enough RAM to have all them running at one time without rebooting, and simply alt tab between them, which is what I do now with VmWare, but with 8GB of RAM, having even two open at one time slows down my system.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 8:39 AM
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

David,


There are things about computers you fundamentally don't understand, and I can prove this by reposting messages you've put up on other lists that indicate you think bigger is better. That's true to a point, but your specifications go way past that point, on to the point of just tossing money around for the sake thereof. . Your specifications are fantastic, even for a commercial data center, but you forgot one thing--the size of the internal drives. 2TB? a 10000RPM drive and only 2TB? 64GB of system memory, 95% of which you'll never use, and only 8TB of combined storage? Come on, man--if you're going to throw money away, why not go for real broke and get respectably-sized drives, like maybe 12TB, making your aggregate storage 48TB.


What on earth do you plan on doing with this thing? Putting a Xeon processor in it and starting Ingram Timesharing or something? BIG LOL!


And of course you know that three months after you buy all of this, which would cost you the better part of at least eight grand, some component of it would be obsolete, or support for some hardware component would end abruptly. That's just the way things are in this business, you know.


And after all of the above, would the songs you write or play be any better? That's the real question. Never mind the hardware. An i3 with four gigs of RAM can produce the same music that your behemoth could, and you could use the leftover money on a promotions budget.



On Fri, 16 Apr 2021 at 12:04, David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:
Hi, if I were getting a new computer, here are the things that I would want first would be the amount of ram would be at least 64 gb of ram, the fastest ram that would be supported by the motherboard.  Second, would be the number of hard drives,4 hard drives. drive speed would be 10,000 rpm size of hard drive would be 2tb for each drive.  Latest i7 or in this case i9 processor with 16 coars.  Operating system windows 10 pro 2 cd rom drives.  a monitor keyboard, speakers These would be the specs for a new computer.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Rawls
Sent: Apr 15, 2021 3:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Hi Barbara, is the storage on OneDrive related  to office 365? If not, how much can you putt on one drive? Jim

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Barbara Sheinbein
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

Hi Jim,

 

Others have mentioned some specs, but I do have a few other ideas for you to consider.  You probably want to be sure your new computer has a camera, one which automatically focuses.  Why you ask?  If you participate in any zoom meetings with friends or family, they will want to see you.  Only one of my two computers has a camera and I must be sure to use it in these situations.

 

Another suggestion is your backup situation.  There are a lot of ways to do this nowadays.  I currently purchased Office 365 which has a very reasonable fee system.  You can set this up with your wife and she can have access to your files.  There is a way to do this and also a way not to share, so you can keep all your secrets!  It is JAWS friendly.  You will have lots of storage for your music or anything else you wish.  There are a variety of packages to select from.  Keep in mind this is where Microsoft is putting all their efforts, so it will likely always be the most accessible.  I also wanted this so if I am unable to access my information due to health for example, my family who I share this with can get access to important information.  There are other cloud storage options out there, but you may want to look at those, but after my own review with my sister, we decided on One Drive.

 

This would eliminate you looking for a less expensive version of Office as well.

 

I also have a network drive.  This has some duplication with the cloud storage, but I had this before I signed up for Office 365.  A network drive allows me to store and work from this physical drive which operates via the modem.  There is a password to prevent others from getting access.  It automatically backs up to a mirror drive so if the primary drive goes bad, all my information will still be available.

 

Lots of moving pieces to consider.  Smile.

 

Good luck.

 

Barbara

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 1:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: if you were getting a new computer.

 

Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like. How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my  new computer.[Jim

 



--
***
“The most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well.”


moderated Re: create a system image.

James Bentley
 

Hello Dave,

 

I’m glad that you got a chance to experiment with IFW.  But, if you are using a tried and true method of restoring your system after a possible catastrophic  failure  then it sounds like you already have all that you need.

 

However, It seems to me that since you did not test IFW in a real life situation IFW may never have got a chance to display some of the items in its menus that you say are missing.

 

Or, when you got to the place where the window was missing, Root Jaws to PC and arrow down and see the settings that you missed.  Hit the space bar on every thing that you want to check.  I always select byte by byte verification.

 

Features like swiping the drive before writing to the disk begins,  a completion alarm and turning off the PC when restoration has been finished and much much more are all right there when using Jaws.

 

I have used IFW for several years now for making image backups and doing image restorations.

 

Every single one of the items that you are concerned about are absolutely there.  Did you have a previously created IFW image for example, on a USB drive available for restoration?  Maybe IFW needed to see that.

 

Do you have access to a spare not important PC for an actual complete trial run?

 

Sorry for all of the questions but I was originally under the impression that you did not have a working solution for making and restoring your backed up images.  If you have a tried and true working method  that your are comfortable with, then that might be your best bet.

 

You take care,  and the best of luck,

 

James B 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 11:08 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

The computer I am using is running the latest version of Windows 10, with the latest updates, JAWS 2021.

 

Following your last post, I used the I F W create recovery boot disk. I chose to save the .ISO file to the route folder of drive J. I use Power ISO, to load the files onto a thumb drive. I plugged the thumb drive into my laptop and press the power button, and waited. After about 3 minutes, I pressed CTRL+WINDOWS KEY+ENTER, to start Narrator., and sure enough, the program was launched and  started in the usual window.

 

I launched Image for Windows, and tabbed to the list of options and chose "restore". I tapped the DOWN ARROW, until the Normal restore function was selected. I then selected the drive and path to where the backup file I wanted to use was located. I then selected all the partitions on the drive. As the system drive is the only internal drive, it was chosen by default. I was then presented with the Start button, to begin the restoration of the image, to the C drive. As I did not wish to overwrite the current version of the Windows operating system, I closed the program.

 

This is all well and good, if you are prepared to accept all the settings which have been predetermined by the manufacturer, and which, in all probability,, will be perfectly satisfactory for most users, however, there is a very important window, which is left out, when you use the I F W create recovery boot disk, that is, the window, which contains many very important options, such as verifying the image before it is restored; verifying the image byte-for-byte before  the image is restored; wiping free space after the image has been restored; restarting the computer when the restoration process has been completed successfully; etc. This window is displayed immediately before the window which contains the "Start" button which starts the restore process.

 

When you use the I F W Restore utility within Windows or, you use the utility within a session using a Talking Windows Preinstall Environment, the windows I mentioned toward the end of the previous paragraph, is displayed.

 

The I F W create recovery boot disk is a very good way to restore an image but, for me, the exclusion of the options window, is a distinct disadvantage, so I think I will stay with the tried and tested method that I have always used, to restore a system image backup to a computer's system drive.

 

Image for Windows, is very accessible, using Narrator.

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 1:08 AM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Hello Dave,

 

No, I did not have to do any thing to put Narrator on the boot disk.

 

As I remember, after booting up off of the boot disk, you turn Narrator on exactly the same way that you do with Windows.

 

 

Control+Windows Key+Enter.

 

And in my case, I use a USB thumb drive instead of a disk on two different Windows10 laptops.

 

When I purchased Image for Windows, years ago, I was told that it could be used on five PC’s.

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 5:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

When you used the I F W create recovery boot disk, did you have to check a check box, to include NVDA to start, during the utilities boot process?

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:11 PM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Hello Dave,

 

I wasn’t even aware that an IFW PE existed.  I do not see that in my version of IFW but there is so much stuff there, I do not doubt it.

 

But, in my post, I was referring to the IFW create recovery boot disk.  This comes with the Image for Windows software.  This is not a WinPE.  It is however, a utility, more specifically, a recovery utility that came with my IFW.  It absolutely does include Narrator which allows a blind person to do a complete image restore without a Win10PE or any other utilities or software.

 

Regards,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

The I F W PE tool, does not come with any screen reader. It is possible to create a Preinstall Environment which includes a screen reader, such as NVDA but, why reinvent the wheel. As I have mentioned before, there are 2 versions of a Talking Preinstall Environment, 1 for Windows 7 and 1 for Windows 10. They both come with NVDA  and Eloquence, as the speech engine. I personally prefer the one for Windows 7. The additional programs which are included with the Windows 10 TWPE, I have stored in a folder on the external USB drive, where I keep the image backups for all our systems.

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 3:02 PM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

In order to use the I F W recovery utility, you need to run it within one of the 2 TWPE, I mentioned in my previous email. Although, there is a way to include NVDA in the I F W PE building utility itself but, I have no idea how to do that.

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 1:09 PM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Hi Dave,

 

Assuming that you are using a newer version of Image For Windows, does IFW still incorporate the Narrator Screen reader on its recovery disk?

 

My version of Image for Windows is around 6years old.  My version of IFW itself will make you a recovery disk that includes the Microsoft screen reader, Narrator.   So a blind person can use speech during a recovery.

 

However, one would still have to memorize the steps to get their particular PC to boot off of that bootable USB   recovery disk.  It is also possible to get a sighted person to make a one time change in the boot sequence in the BIOS so the computer will always boot from any USB device that may be inserted during PC start up.

 

I have needed to make several emergency recovery’s over the years because Windows was too corrupted to even boot.  One  time I restored my complete system on to a brand new drive with no problems.  IFW never let me down.

 

I paid around $40.00, around 6 years ago for my copy.  The do have a 30 day trial version.

 

I just wonder if Narrator still comes with IFW.

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:05 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Randy:

 

I use Image for Windows, produced by Terabyte. You get a 30 day trial, then you need to purchase a license, to go on using the program. I do not think the purchase price is that expensive, probably about 50 dollars, US.

 

As far as I know, there are 2 versions of a Talking Windoes Preinstall Environment (TWPE). One produced by Brian Smart for Windows 7 and another by someone by the name of Carlos, sorry I do not know his last name, for Windows 10. Once you  boot into either TWPE, hopefully You should be able to run Macrium Reflect Free, to restore a previously created image to your system drive, using NVDA to speak the prompts and menues.

 

I use Brian Smart's Windows 7 TWPE and the Image for Windows  restore utility, to restore images. I use this TWPE because, I find that it boots faster, an it definitely shuts down the computer correctly, when you have finished restoring an image or, when you have finished using the TWPE for any other reason.

 

When I have used Carlos's TWPE, I have found that when you shut down the computer, it occasionally hangs, and you need to press and hold the power button, until the system switches off.

 

HTH

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:54 AM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Will it run within Win PE?

On 4/13/2021 5:04 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 07:58 PM, Alan Lemly wrote:

I did need a bit of sighted help to restore

-
Which is true of the vast majority of backup/restore software because the restore process takes place without Windows itself actually being running, meaning there is no screen reader support.  

Most of my sighted clients have no idea how to do a restore even if they wanted to, but several have been very, very thankful indeed that they had a backup that they'd taken on a regular cycle when they had storage failure (whether HDD or SSD) but had to have me do the actual restore.  It sure as heck beats losing all the data one acquires over years on most computer systems!
 --

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

There are many who labor under the gross misapprehension that the Constitution is a cage and a laundry-list rather than a framework upon which great things have been and still will be built. Many things that are entirely Constitutional are not "in the Constitution," but are allowed under it.

            ~Brian Vogel


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Tyler Wood
 

Hi,

Yes, definitely a hard drive for my backup medium here.

The 3 2 1 approach is always a good thing – I can, for instance, highly recommend backblaze’s single computer backup service. It has been reliable, accessible, and utterly, wonderfully easy.

thanks

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 12:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

I agree with Brian... :) using a SSD for backup is not a good practice. Like he said hdd's give warnings of failure. But that is rare. I have drives that are creeping up on 10 years old and still work. Although I should probably retire them now that I think of just how old they are getting.

On 4/16/2021 7:40 AM, Alan Lemly wrote:

Richard's statement made me pause too. Conventional hard disk drives have been around since the mid 1980s and have gotten better, more reliable, and less expensive during that time. They are much more reliable as a backup medium as opposed to SSDs which are still evolving and expensive in my opinion.

 

Alan Lemly 

 

with Outlook for iOS


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 8:52:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 09:38 AM, Richard Turner wrote:

I would not put the files I value on an HD drive these days since the price of SSD has come down so far.

-

I really do not understand this statement, and I say that as a professional computer tech.

I personally prefer SSDs for OS drives just due to the speed factor, but definitely not for reliability or recoverability.  All of my personal backup drives are HDDs because they are very reliable (and have been for decades now) and will generally give you lots of warning signs before failure.  SSDs have a tendency to be very much like jump drives, SD cards, and similar in that when they decide to die they just up and die.  And I can definitely say that the cost of data recovery from SSDs (and other similar media) is far more expensive and less certain than HDDs.

I wouldn't even think of using an SSD as my primary backup media.  Until they become far less inclined to sudden death, and until data recovery probability goes way up and costs go way down, I'll use HDDs as backup media.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Randy Barnett <blindmansbluff09@...>
 

I agree with Brian... :) using a SSD for backup is not a good practice. Like he said hdd's give warnings of failure. But that is rare. I have drives that are creeping up on 10 years old and still work. Although I should probably retire them now that I think of just how old they are getting.

On 4/16/2021 7:40 AM, Alan Lemly wrote:
Richard's statement made me pause too. Conventional hard disk drives have been around since the mid 1980s and have gotten better, more reliable, and less expensive during that time. They are much more reliable as a backup medium as opposed to SSDs which are still evolving and expensive in my opinion.

Alan Lemly 

with Outlook for iOS

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 8:52:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.
 
On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 09:38 AM, Richard Turner wrote:
I would not put the files I value on an HD drive these days since the price of SSD has come down so far.
-
I really do not understand this statement, and I say that as a professional computer tech.

I personally prefer SSDs for OS drives just due to the speed factor, but definitely not for reliability or recoverability.  All of my personal backup drives are HDDs because they are very reliable (and have been for decades now) and will generally give you lots of warning signs before failure.  SSDs have a tendency to be very much like jump drives, SD cards, and similar in that when they decide to die they just up and die.  And I can definitely say that the cost of data recovery from SSDs (and other similar media) is far more expensive and less certain than HDDs.

I wouldn't even think of using an SSD as my primary backup media.  Until they become far less inclined to sudden death, and until data recovery probability goes way up and costs go way down, I'll use HDDs as backup media.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: kortana screen

Soronel Haetir
 

I am also not aware of any way to get rid of it in a normal way.
However if you are comfortable with regedit.exe, you can set/create a
DWORD value named AllowCortana with a value of 0 in
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Windows Search

and that should prevent it from running in the future. You do have to
reboot (or maybe just log-out then back in) after making that change
for it to take effect. And note that I had to create the "Windows
Search" key in addition to the "" value AllowCortana.

On 4/16/21, Jaffar Sidek <jaffar.sidek10@gmail.com> wrote:
Juan.  I am afraid, and this is a personal thing of course, that the
only way it can be closed is for you to go to task manager, press k
until you encounter it, then press delete.  I've heard it can't be
closed the normal way because it is a floating window. Hopefully,
someone else might have a better solution though. Cheers!

On 16/4/2021 10:33 pm, Juan Hernandez wrote:

HI All,

I have this weird window that is called kortana where it has a edit
box to type stuff to her, and a voice button to enable speaking to
her.  I can’t seem to get rid of it though, it stays in my alt+tab
order.  Does anyone know how to get rid of it?

Best,

Juan





--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com


moderated Re: New computer fun

Dave Durber
 

Marty:
 
Does the name of the folder in which you keep your audio files and play lists on the D drive, have the same name as it did when it was located on the c drive?
 
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 2:59 AM
Subject: New computer fun

Hello everyone.  I have made the change from Windows 7 to a brand new Windows 10 machine with lots of bells and  whisels.  I have transferred all of my files to the D drive, which before, they were in the C drive.  Now for the fun part.  How do I get my playlists to play in Winamp?  I am running the most recent JAWS update.  The music files and the play list .M3U files are together in the same folder thatt they were on my old computer.  The Winamp program, however is on the C drive.  Is this my problem?

I have lots of other questions like how to get my contacts into Outlook 2016 or Windows Mail, but that is another thread.  Thanks in advanced for any hents.

Love in Christ

Marty

The Gospel is freely accessible to all.


moderated Re: create a system image.

Dave Durber
 

Jim:
 
I use the G U I
 
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 2:31 PM
Subject: Re: create a system image.

Dave,
Do you use the GUI version of IFW or the CLI version?
Thanks,

Jim Weiss



On Apr 15, 2021, at 7:05 AM, Dave Durber <d.durber@...> wrote:

Randy:
 
I use Image for Windows, produced by Terabyte. You get a 30 day trial, then you need to purchase a license, to go on using the program. I do not think the purchase price is that expensive, probably about 50 dollars, US.
 
As far as I know, there are 2 versions of a Talking Windoes Preinstall Environment (TWPE). One produced by Brian Smart for Windows 7 and another by someone by the name of Carlos, sorry I do not know his last name, for Windows 10. Once you  boot into either TWPE, hopefully You should be able to run Macrium Reflect Free, to restore a previously created image to your system drive, using NVDA to speak the prompts and menues.
 
I use Brian Smart's Windows 7 TWPE and the Image for Windows  restore utility, to restore images. I use this TWPE because, I find that it boots faster, an it definitely shuts down the computer correctly, when you have finished restoring an image or, when you have finished using the TWPE for any other reason.
 
When I have used Carlos's TWPE, I have found that when you shut down the computer, it occasionally hangs, and you need to press and hold the power button, until the system switches off.
 
HTH
 
Dave
 
----- Original Message ----- 
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:54 AM
Subject: Re: create a system image.

Will it run within Win PE?

On 4/13/2021 5:04 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 07:58 PM, Alan Lemly wrote:
I did need a bit of sighted help to restore
-
Which is true of the vast majority of backup/restore software because the restore process takes place without Windows itself actually being running, meaning there is no screen reader support.  

Most of my sighted clients have no idea how to do a restore even if they wanted to, but several have been very, very thankful indeed that they had a backup that they'd taken on a regular cycle when they had storage failure (whether HDD or SSD) but had to have me do the actual restore.  It sure as heck beats losing all the data one acquires over years on most computer systems!
 -- 

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

There are many who labor under the gross misapprehension that the Constitution is a cage and a laundry-list rather than a framework upon which great things have been and still will be built. Many things that are entirely Constitutional are not "in the Constitution," but are allowed under it.

            ~Brian Vogel



moderated Re: create a system image.

Dave Durber
 


James:
 
The computer I am using is running the latest version of Windows 10, with the latest updates, JAWS 2021.
 
Following your last post, I used the I F W create recovery boot disk. I chose to save the .ISO file to the route folder of drive J. I use Power ISO, to load the files onto a thumb drive. I plugged the thumb drive into my laptop and press the power button, and waited. After about 3 minutes, I pressed CTRL+WINDOWS KEY+ENTER, to start Narrator., and sure enough, the program was launched and  started in the usual window.
 
I launched Image for Windows, and tabbed to the list of options and chose "restore". I tapped the DOWN ARROW, until the Normal restore function was selected. I then selected the drive and path to where the backup file I wanted to use was located. I then selected all the partitions on the drive. As the system drive is the only internal drive, it was chosen by default. I was then presented with the Start button, to begin the restoration of the image, to the C drive. As I did not wish to overwrite the current version of the Windows operating system, I closed the program.
 
This is all well and good, if you are prepared to accept all the settings which have been predetermined by the manufacturer, and which, in all probability,, will be perfectly satisfactory for most users, however, there is a very important window, which is left out, when you use the I F W create recovery boot disk, that is, the window, which contains many very important options, such as verifying the image before it is restored; verifying the image byte-for-byte before  the image is restored; wiping free space after the image has been restored; restarting the computer when the restoration process has been completed successfully; etc. This window is displayed immediately before the window which contains the "Start" button which starts the restore process.
 
When you use the I F W Restore utility within Windows or, you use the utility within a session using a Talking Windows Preinstall Environment, the windows I mentioned toward the end of the previous paragraph, is displayed.
 
The I F W create recovery boot disk is a very good way to restore an image but, for me, the exclusion of the options window, is a distinct disadvantage, so I think I will stay with the tried and tested method that I have always used, to restore a system image backup to a computer's system drive.
 
Image for Windows, is very accessible, using Narrator.
 
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 1:08 AM
Subject: Re: create a system image.

Hello Dave,

 

No, I did not have to do any thing to put Narrator on the boot disk.

 

As I remember, after booting up off of the boot disk, you turn Narrator on exactly the same way that you do with Windows.

 

 

Control+Windows Key+Enter.

 

And in my case, I use a USB thumb drive instead of a disk on two different Windows10 laptops.

 

When I purchased Image for Windows, years ago, I was told that it could be used on five PC’s.

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 5:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

When you used the I F W create recovery boot disk, did you have to check a check box, to include NVDA to start, during the utilities boot process?

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:11 PM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Hello Dave,

 

I wasn’t even aware that an IFW PE existed.  I do not see that in my version of IFW but there is so much stuff there, I do not doubt it.

 

But, in my post, I was referring to the IFW create recovery boot disk.  This comes with the Image for Windows software.  This is not a WinPE.  It is however, a utility, more specifically, a recovery utility that came with my IFW.  It absolutely does include Narrator which allows a blind person to do a complete image restore without a Win10PE or any other utilities or software.

 

Regards,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

The I F W PE tool, does not come with any screen reader. It is possible to create a Preinstall Environment which includes a screen reader, such as NVDA but, why reinvent the wheel. As I have mentioned before, there are 2 versions of a Talking Preinstall Environment, 1 for Windows 7 and 1 for Windows 10. They both come with NVDA  and Eloquence, as the speech engine. I personally prefer the one for Windows 7. The additional programs which are included with the Windows 10 TWPE, I have stored in a folder on the external USB drive, where I keep the image backups for all our systems.

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 3:02 PM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

James:

 

In order to use the I F W recovery utility, you need to run it within one of the 2 TWPE, I mentioned in my previous email. Although, there is a way to include NVDA in the I F W PE building utility itself but, I have no idea how to do that.

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 1:09 PM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Hi Dave,

 

Assuming that you are using a newer version of Image For Windows, does IFW still incorporate the Narrator Screen reader on its recovery disk?

 

My version of Image for Windows is around 6years old.  My version of IFW itself will make you a recovery disk that includes the Microsoft screen reader, Narrator.   So a blind person can use speech during a recovery.

 

However, one would still have to memorize the steps to get their particular PC to boot off of that bootable USB   recovery disk.  It is also possible to get a sighted person to make a one time change in the boot sequence in the BIOS so the computer will always boot from any USB device that may be inserted during PC start up.

 

I have needed to make several emergency recovery’s over the years because Windows was too corrupted to even boot.  One  time I restored my complete system on to a brand new drive with no problems.  IFW never let me down.

 

I paid around $40.00, around 6 years ago for my copy.  The do have a 30 day trial version.

 

I just wonder if Narrator still comes with IFW.

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:05 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Randy:

 

I use Image for Windows, produced by Terabyte. You get a 30 day trial, then you need to purchase a license, to go on using the program. I do not think the purchase price is that expensive, probably about 50 dollars, US.

 

As far as I know, there are 2 versions of a Talking Windoes Preinstall Environment (TWPE). One produced by Brian Smart for Windows 7 and another by someone by the name of Carlos, sorry I do not know his last name, for Windows 10. Once you  boot into either TWPE, hopefully You should be able to run Macrium Reflect Free, to restore a previously created image to your system drive, using NVDA to speak the prompts and menues.

 

I use Brian Smart's Windows 7 TWPE and the Image for Windows  restore utility, to restore images. I use this TWPE because, I find that it boots faster, an it definitely shuts down the computer correctly, when you have finished restoring an image or, when you have finished using the TWPE for any other reason.

 

When I have used Carlos's TWPE, I have found that when you shut down the computer, it occasionally hangs, and you need to press and hold the power button, until the system switches off.

 

HTH

 

Dave

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:54 AM

Subject: Re: create a system image.

 

Will it run within Win PE?

On 4/13/2021 5:04 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 07:58 PM, Alan Lemly wrote:

I did need a bit of sighted help to restore

-
Which is true of the vast majority of backup/restore software because the restore process takes place without Windows itself actually being running, meaning there is no screen reader support.  

Most of my sighted clients have no idea how to do a restore even if they wanted to, but several have been very, very thankful indeed that they had a backup that they'd taken on a regular cycle when they had storage failure (whether HDD or SSD) but had to have me do the actual restore.  It sure as heck beats losing all the data one acquires over years on most computer systems!
 --

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

There are many who labor under the gross misapprehension that the Constitution is a cage and a laundry-list rather than a framework upon which great things have been and still will be built. Many things that are entirely Constitutional are not "in the Constitution," but are allowed under it.

            ~Brian Vogel


moderated Re: tutorials on using the spell check in Word with Jaws

Udo Egner-Walter
 

Hi Monica, 

in addition to the F7 hot key: you could use the hot key Control+F7 to jump to the next proofreading error. If Microsoft Word found one a context menu opens with suggestions. Search the right word and press Enter to correct the word. Personally I think this is the fastest way of proof reading a document. 

All the best
Udo 




Am 16.04.2021 um 16:20 schrieb Monica S <mrod16@...>:

Thank you to everyone who answered this thread.  Thanks to your notes, I was successfully able to use it.

 

Sincerely,

 

Monica

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 4:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: tutorials on using the spell check in Word with Jaws

 

Monica,

 

Tab through the choices to get familiar with them. Among them are:

Ignore, meaning skip this single instance because you intended what  you wrote there.

Ignore all, meaning each time this word turns up in this document, don’t  change it.

Add to dictionary, where the word is permanently added and will be accepted in all documents, not just the current one.

Change. Here, a shift-tab should bring up a list of alternatives. Arrow down to the correct  one and confirm by tabbing to “change” and pressing spacebar.

Change all. This is nice because it saves you from having to make the same correction in the document over and over.

Shortcuts include “c” for change, “l” for change all, “I” for ignore once, “g” for ignore all, and “a” for add to dictionary.

Some quirks:

On my system, I must press alt with the desired single-letter shortcut when I’m in Outlook 2016. So, instead of tabbing to change, I press alt-c when the correct option appears. However, I mustn’t press the alt key when I’m in Word 2016: just the single letter.

Another quirk: sometimes Word intrudes with an explanation of why it doesn’t like what it sees. When this happens, I’m not always aware of it. when I suspect that’s what’s going on, I press insert-numpad 8 to read the current line. I hear the explanation, press escape, and I’m returned to the tabbed choices.

 

I hope these notes help get  you started.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monica S
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 4:12 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: tutorials on using the spell check in Word with Jaws

 

Hello everyone, does anyone have any suggestions as to how I could learn about using the spell check functions in MS Word with Jaws?  I’m using Office 365 and the latest update in for Jaws 2021.  I guess I haven’t used it in a long time.  I press F7 and it gives me choices I have never heard before.  Thanks for any assistance.

 

Sincerely,

 

Monica

 




moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

I can say, though, that I am actually heartened that a serious and spontaneous discussion of backup media has occurred, period.

One of the dumbest things that many computer owners continue to persist with is NOT taking regular cyclic backups.  Most of my worst service calls are due to drive failures where no backup, whether just of user data or a full system image, exists.  The last client I had who had a drive failure (with a HDD, in this case, and he kept trying to fire the machine up and could hear it making noise - an absolute no-no) had a drive so badly damaged that even a professional data recovery company could not recover his data (or at least more than 70% of it, which allows the customer to reject the recovery if less than 70%).  He lost years of stuff including digital photos, documents, etc.

Taking full system image backups as well as separate user data backups on a regular, cyclic basis really should be considered a basic task of computer ownership, and both are easy.  Windows 10 has an excellent built-in utility for user data backups, File History (though I tweak the defaults to make it keep far fewer versions of individual files, and for less time prior to the last time the file was updated).  There are myriad options for full system image backups, which have been recently discussed on this very group.

In the end, I care far less about any given user being able to do their own recovery than that they have a backup that someone can do the recovery from.  If you can DIY, that's great, but a very great many individuals can't, nor do they want to.  But taking the backups so that they're available if ever needed is something that the owner or primary user of a given computer should be doing as a matter of course.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Dave Durber
 


Brian:
 
I agree with everything you wrote, one thousand and one percent
 
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 2:52 PM
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.

On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 09:38 AM, Richard Turner wrote:
I would not put the files I value on an HD drive these days since the price of SSD has come down so far.
-
I really do not understand this statement, and I say that as a professional computer tech.

I personally prefer SSDs for OS drives just due to the speed factor, but definitely not for reliability or recoverability.  All of my personal backup drives are HDDs because they are very reliable (and have been for decades now) and will generally give you lots of warning signs before failure.  SSDs have a tendency to be very much like jump drives, SD cards, and similar in that when they decide to die they just up and die.  And I can definitely say that the cost of data recovery from SSDs (and other similar media) is far more expensive and less certain than HDDs.

I wouldn't even think of using an SSD as my primary backup media.  Until they become far less inclined to sudden death, and until data recovery probability goes way up and costs go way down, I'll use HDDs as backup media.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: if you were getting a new computer.

 

Richard's statement made me pause too. Conventional hard disk drives have been around since the mid 1980s and have gotten better, more reliable, and less expensive during that time. They are much more reliable as a backup medium as opposed to SSDs which are still evolving and expensive in my opinion.

Alan Lemly 

with Outlook for iOS


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 8:52:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: if you were getting a new computer.
 
On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 09:38 AM, Richard Turner wrote:
I would not put the files I value on an HD drive these days since the price of SSD has come down so far.
-
I really do not understand this statement, and I say that as a professional computer tech.

I personally prefer SSDs for OS drives just due to the speed factor, but definitely not for reliability or recoverability.  All of my personal backup drives are HDDs because they are very reliable (and have been for decades now) and will generally give you lots of warning signs before failure.  SSDs have a tendency to be very much like jump drives, SD cards, and similar in that when they decide to die they just up and die.  And I can definitely say that the cost of data recovery from SSDs (and other similar media) is far more expensive and less certain than HDDs.

I wouldn't even think of using an SSD as my primary backup media.  Until they become far less inclined to sudden death, and until data recovery probability goes way up and costs go way down, I'll use HDDs as backup media.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: kortana screen

Jaffar Sidek
 

Juan.  I am afraid, and this is a personal thing of course, that the only way it can be closed is for you to go to task manager, press k until you encounter it, then press delete.  I've heard it can't be closed the normal way because it is a floating window.  Hopefully, someone else might have a better solution though.  Cheers!

On 16/4/2021 10:33 pm, Juan Hernandez wrote:

HI All,

 

I have this weird window that is called kortana where it has a edit box to type stuff to her, and a voice button to enable speaking to her.  I can’t seem to get rid of it though, it stays in my alt+tab order.  Does anyone know how to get rid of it?

 

Best,

 

Juan

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