Date   

moderated Re: Jaws startup error

Ron Pelletier
 

Hi Ann,

I wouldn't mess around. I'd just download a fresh version from the web site and install it right on top of yours.. I've had that problem with doing just an update. You are better off downloading the latest version rather than just asking JAWS to do an update when it is suggested.

Ron & Glo00BE

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of ann
Sent: August 6, 2022 1:56 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Jaws startup error

Hi folks,


I'm running the latest Jaws V2022 on latest Windows 10. I get this error each time I start or re-start Jaws.

'activate.jsb is not a valid script file:

Speech will not start up until I press Enter or space bar on an OK button.


This is so annoying. What is this error, and how do I fix it?


Thanks,

~Ann


moderated Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

David Diamond
 

I like to say you have to crawl before you can run. Pretty much means the same thing. Smile.

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Gene Warner <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 8:47:07 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
 
You see what you want to see, I do not feel I was being rude, I was
being honest because I've been there.

A rehab instructor who was supposed to teach the basics of using a
screen reader did that to everyone in the class I was in. It left most,
if not all, of us confused because we had no idea what we needed to
learn to get started other than everything. So most of us could not
answer his question with anything other than a "I don't know". It was
not a very comfortable situation.

Several months later when I attended an alumni Christmas party I learned
that more than half of that class never returned just like I did and
that that instructor was no longer employed there, he was terminated
soon after I left. I can only guess that many of the other students in
that class complained about him.

Now maybe Brian was teaching an intermediate or advanced level class in
which case his approach would have been appropriate, but that approach
is not appropriate when your students don't know what they need to learn
yet.

Before you can run, you must first learn to walk.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 10:03 PM, Don Walls wrote:
> Harsh!  Do you really need to be so rude?  It seems reasonable that an
> instructor ask a student about the student's goals and needs.
>
> Don
>

> -----Original Message----- From: Gene Warner
> Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 2:22 PM
> To: main@jfw.groups.io
> Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
>
> You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be
> a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you
> can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal
> is, you have no business being an instructor.
>
> Gene...
>
>
> On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
>> I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out
>> and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to
>> learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking.  The
>> enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student
>> doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want.  Then there
>> is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the
>> teacher is not listening to his or her student.  Indirectly related. 
>> A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted,
>> I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear
>> enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask.  Smile. A good
>> teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or
>> giving vague questions or answers.  If a blind person asks where
>> something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over
>> there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however
>> not in a way that the blind person can understand.
>>
>> *From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian
>> Vogel
>> *Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
>> *To:* main@jfw.groups.io
>> *Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
>>
>> On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
>>
>>     Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
>>     at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
>>     and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to
>> learn?"
>>
>> -
>> Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either. 
>> Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I
>> am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that
>> allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while
>> learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what
>> programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach
>> screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to
>> read, research, etc.
>>
>> One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field
>> counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually
>> Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen
>> reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for
>> being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me,
>> at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their
>> lives.
>>
>> I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even
>> means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't
>> function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want
>> to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to
>> tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
>> --
>>
>> Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
>>
>> *Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. 
>> If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
>> *     ~ Lauren Bacall
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>






moderated Re: Teaching the use of screen readers:

Mark
 

Conceptual knowledge that helps predict screen reader behavior and support problem solving is great. So I agree that knowing the keyboard handling hierarchy is important.  But is there a user-friendly way for JAWS users to independently determine the level of a given keystroke? 


moderated Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

Gene Warner
 

You see what you want to see, I do not feel I was being rude, I was being honest because I've been there.

A rehab instructor who was supposed to teach the basics of using a screen reader did that to everyone in the class I was in. It left most, if not all, of us confused because we had no idea what we needed to learn to get started other than everything. So most of us could not answer his question with anything other than a "I don't know". It was not a very comfortable situation.

Several months later when I attended an alumni Christmas party I learned that more than half of that class never returned just like I did and that that instructor was no longer employed there, he was terminated soon after I left. I can only guess that many of the other students in that class complained about him.

Now maybe Brian was teaching an intermediate or advanced level class in which case his approach would have been appropriate, but that approach is not appropriate when your students don't know what they need to learn yet.

Before you can run, you must first learn to walk.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 10:03 PM, Don Walls wrote:
Harsh!  Do you really need to be so rude?  It seems reasonable that an instructor ask a student about the student's goals and needs.
Don
-----Original Message----- From: Gene Warner
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 2:22 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be
a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you
can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal
is, you have no business being an instructor.
Gene...
On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking.  The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want.  Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student.  Indirectly related. A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask.  Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers.  If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

    Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
    at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
    and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"

-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either. Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

Gene Warner
 

If the course was an intermediate or advanced level course then I would agree that the best way to begin is to know where your students are and where they want to go. But this was supposed to be a beginning level course where the basics everyone needs to know were to be taught and that does not need any knowledge of what the students goals are because those goals have no bearing on learning the basics. Is that so difficult to understand?

Oh, but I forget, you would probably want to do critical analysis of Shakespeare's writings in a kindergarten level reading class.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 10:03 PM, Don Walls wrote:
Harsh!  Do you really need to be so rude?  It seems reasonable that an instructor ask a student about the student's goals and needs.
Don
-----Original Message----- From: Gene Warner
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 2:22 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be
a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you
can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal
is, you have no business being an instructor.
Gene...
On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking.  The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want.  Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student.  Indirectly related. A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask.  Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers.  If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

    Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
    at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
    and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"

-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either. Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Teaching the use of screen readers:

David Moore
 

I teach the blind exactly the same way, and I am totally blind! If one knows which commands are Windows commands, then you can use any screen reader, and you already know many commands! More commands are Windows commands than specific screen reader commands! I do all I can to get adaptive technology teachers to teach just that way!


On Sun, Aug 7, 2022, 5:58 PM Angel <angel238@...> wrote:

A totally blind adaptive technology instructor several years ago advocated teaching the use of basic windows keyboard commands.  Rather than screen reader specific keyboard commands.  This was when several screen readers were extant; Window-eyes, and “Lookout”, a British screen reader were among those available to computer users.  “Lookout”, as I recall, was a genuine screen reader.  In that it actually read the screen.  Rather than organizing, and interpreting for the blind user in the easiest way possible for the blind computer user what was on the screen.  So, that, regardless the screen reader installed on a computer, one could feel at home using unfamiliar  computers with different screen readers than the individual was used to  installed on them. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 




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moderated Re: Screen shade tips:

Mike B.
 


Hi Angel,
 
You stated earlier that you're running Jaws 18, Screen Shade isn't available in Jaws18, it became first available in Jaws2018 and Windows 10.
 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Angel
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 3:21 PM
Subject: Screen shade tips:

Thank you all for your kind and most gracious assistance.  I will look into using this screen shade feature.  I have saved Brian’s post with the key stroke for turning it on.  It will surely come in handy; when my dear grand children visit. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 




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moderated Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

Don Walls
 

Harsh! Do you really need to be so rude? It seems reasonable that an instructor ask a student about the student's goals and needs.

Don

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene Warner
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 2:22 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be
a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you
can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal
is, you have no business being an instructor.

Gene...


On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking. The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want. Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student. Indirectly related. A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask. Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers. If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"

-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either. Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults. I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them. I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing. A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else. And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation. I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?" And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
* ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Blocking the mouse buttons:

David Diamond
 

True, you could turn off jaws. However, then you need a shortcut combo to turn it back on. As with most things, there are many roads to Rome.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nermin via groups.io
Sent: August 7, 2022 2:47 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking the mouse buttons:

Hi,


the key combination Dave gave in his earlier message will not, in fact, turn off JAWS.

All it does is mute speech temporarily, unless certain key combinations are pressed, JAWS+T being one of them, which will anounce the window title.


To turn off JAWS, press JAWS+F4.

That will open up a confirmation dialogue, just press enter and JAWS is off.

Make sure you either know that JAWS is the only item on your desktop
starting with j, use Narrator or assign a hotkey for JAWS so you can
turn it on later.


Regards,

Nermin


moderated Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

David Diamond
 

"keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.  Perhaps however, when I was growing up and used a magnification device, my family would literally stand about 10 feet behind me and read what I was looking at.  Going as far as to make comments. One blind parent, his children would constantly mute the sound because they did not know how to turn jaws off.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 3:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Screen shade tips:

 

And, for good measure

1. A YouTube Video on how to Turn On/Off the JAWS Screen Shade
2. Message 
 in the topic, Automatically start the screen shade with Jaws, that covers how to insert screen shade into an autostart script.  All the messages leading up to the one referenced are bottom quoted.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

Gene Warner
 

I agree, first you teach the basics that everyone needs to know, then you ask what the student's goals are. That's not what this instructor did, he assumed that you already knew the basics even though the class was labeled as a beginning JAWS class.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 7:01 PM, Lori Lynn wrote:
Brian, I completely agree with you. In my past life I managed a large training contract where JAWS was one of our largest training groups. Yes, there were basics that all the trainers started out teaching. But before their scheduled training was over, they focused on specific applications and web pages that the student needed to focus on. The trainer can not be expected to know all things about all trainees. To be a successful trainer you must get feedback and input from the student.
When I first got a computer at home with JAWS, I chose web pages that I thought would be fun or interesting. Exploring them helped me to become the proficient JAWS user that I now am.
Lori Lynn
*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* Sunday, August 7, 2022 4:33 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't
teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is,
you have no business being an instructor.
-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.
Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset. But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.
To each his or her own.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

Lori Lynn
 

Brian, I completely agree with you. In my past life I managed a large training contract where JAWS was one of our largest training groups. Yes, there were basics that all the trainers started out teaching. But before their scheduled training was over, they focused on specific applications and web pages that the student needed to focus on. The trainer can not be expected to know all things about all trainees. To be a successful trainer you must get feedback and input from the student.

 

When I first got a computer at home with JAWS, I chose web pages that I thought would be fun or interesting. Exploring them helped me to become the proficient JAWS user that I now am.

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 4:33 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

 

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is, you have no business being an instructor.

-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.

Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset.  But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.

To each his or her own.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Screen shade tips:

 

Just so that toggle for the JAWS Screen Shade is included in this topic which directly references the function, it is:  JAWS Key + Space, F11

See this topic from May 2018 on this very group, that was entitled screen curtain, from approximately the time that the feature was introduced if you want more background.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

K0LNY
 


Numerous times, before Jaws included the screen refresh audio feature, I would have to try to get audio back on a client's computer, because rather than unloading the screenreader, a family member just  muted the sound and didn't turn it on when they were done.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 5:20 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 06:22 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
Another trick, is just turn on keyboard help, insert + #1.
-
That is an insanely clever trick.  My hat's off to you!

It also has the added advantage that if you forbade the use of your computer, it's instantly obvious if someone's trying to use it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

K0LNY
 

Another trick, is just turn on keyboard help, insert + #1.
If they aren't a screenreader user, they probably won't figure out how to
toggle it off.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 5:19 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:


If I am going to have guests that I don't want using my computer, I put
a password on it and keep it locked or turned off unless I am using it.
After they leave I remove the password.

Gene...


On 8/7/2022 6:12 PM, Angel wrote:
I will ask a direct question, then. I have a single computer in my
home. Do you have parental controls installed on your computers; for
the occasions your grand children visit? If not, how do you prevent
them from using your computers to visit unwanted sites? Or from
accessing social media sites on your computers. I just thought the
easiest way to prevent such unfortunate behaviors from occurring was to
be able to prevent the grand children from employing the use of the
mouse. While not inconveniencing a keyboard user to terribly much. I
don’t want to inconvenience myself to much just to prevent the undesired
use of occasional users.

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Windows



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moderated Screen shade tips:

Angel
 

Thank you all for your kind and most gracious assistance.  I will look into using this screen shade feature.  I have saved Brian’s post with the key stroke for turning it on.  It will surely come in handy; when my dear grand children visit. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 




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moderated Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


moderated Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Gene Warner
 

If I am going to have guests that I don't want using my computer, I put a password on it and keep it locked or turned off unless I am using it. After they leave I remove the password.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 6:12 PM, Angel wrote:
I will ask a direct question, then.  I have a single computer in my home.  Do you have parental controls installed on your computers; for the occasions your grand children visit?  If not, how do you prevent them from using your computers to visit unwanted sites?  Or from accessing social media sites on your computers.  I just thought the easiest way to prevent such unfortunate behaviors from occurring was to be able to prevent the grand children from employing the use of the mouse.  While not inconveniencing  a keyboard user to terribly much.  I don’t want to inconvenience myself to much just to prevent the undesired use of occasional users.
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