Date   

moderated Re: back ups

Sharon
 

Where would I get that program? I’d want to ensure it was the right one before attempting to use it!

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2022 9:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

On Tue, Feb 15, 2022 at 09:23 AM, Dave Durber wrote:

One more thing, as an individual who no longer has any vision, I have been using Terabyte's Backup and Restore suite, Otherwise called, Image for Windows, for 9 years. During that time, I have never needed any assistance from anyone, to restore any backed up image, whether it be a system image or data image to any drive for any system.

-
Said without the slightest trace of snark:  Good for you!

If you (the generic you) are able to use a talking Windows PE to do a full system image restore, more power to you.

That's not going to change my position, and not just about my blind clients, that most computer users will never even attempt one on their own.  The important, nay, critical thing is to be taking backups so that, should disaster strike, someone is able to restore from them.  Very often, that someone is not you, and there's no shame in that.

People hire techs such as myself all the time to do things like setting up their systems, getting their peripherals set up, configuring their WiFi, turning off the media keys function on computers where that must be done in BIOS/UEFI, and more.  Given the fact that, if you are very lucky, you will never need to restore from a backup being able to do so independently, regardless of your visual status, should be way down the list of concerns.  Having that insurance policy to fall back on, even if you hire someone else to do the work, should be at the top.
 
The big problem is that far, far, far too many people still do not take routine system image backups and end up losing everything as a direct result of that "lack of practice" when a catastrophic drive failure occurs.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

 

On Tue, Feb 15, 2022 at 09:23 AM, Dave Durber wrote:
One more thing, as an individual who no longer has any vision, I have been using Terabyte's Backup and Restore suite, Otherwise called, Image for Windows, for 9 years. During that time, I have never needed any assistance from anyone, to restore any backed up image, whether it be a system image or data image to any drive for any system.
-
Said without the slightest trace of snark:  Good for you!

If you (the generic you) are able to use a talking Windows PE to do a full system image restore, more power to you.

That's not going to change my position, and not just about my blind clients, that most computer users will never even attempt one on their own.  The important, nay, critical thing is to be taking backups so that, should disaster strike, someone is able to restore from them.  Very often, that someone is not you, and there's no shame in that.

People hire techs such as myself all the time to do things like setting up their systems, getting their peripherals set up, configuring their WiFi, turning off the media keys function on computers where that must be done in BIOS/UEFI, and more.  Given the fact that, if you are very lucky, you will never need to restore from a backup being able to do so independently, regardless of your visual status, should be way down the list of concerns.  Having that insurance policy to fall back on, even if you hire someone else to do the work, should be at the top.
 
The big problem is that far, far, far too many people still do not take routine system image backups and end up losing everything as a direct result of that "lack of practice" when a catastrophic drive failure occurs.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

Dave Durber
 


Brian:
 
I just returned home from a visit to a friend. The day before returning home, I turned on my laptop and, for some reason or other, the system would not start. When I got home yesterday, I ran Brian Smart's Windows 7 Talking Windows Preinstal Environment using a USB memory stick. Using Terabyte's PE Builder Plugin Installer, which comes as part of the Terabyte back up and restore suite, I was able to use the utility in the TWPE, to restore a backed up image of the system I created a few days earlier. In less than 30 minutes, My system was fully restored and I had access to it again.
 
One more thing, as an individual who no longer has any vision, I have been using Terabyte's Backup and Restore suite, Otherwise called, Image for Windows, for 9 years. During that time, I have never needed any assistance from anyone, to restore any backed up image, whether it be a system image or data image to any drive for any system.
 
Dave Durber
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 6:49 PM
Subject: Re: back ups

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 01:38 PM, Chris Hill wrote:
I often wanna restore a whole system not just the data on it
-
If someone is to have only "one type of backup" the only type I recommend is full system images.  While one's data is absolutely precious, so is all the time and effort and money you've put in to creating a computing environment to suit yourself.

Getting every scrap of your data back is only part of the equation, at least for most people.  They really want to be able to "pick up exactly where I was" when a backup was taken if the need to recover ever arises.  And the only way to do that is with full system image backups.

I learned this, personally, the very hard way when I was young and stupid and still believed, "Oh, a drive failure/electrical surge/etc. will never happen to me!"  And the sheer pleasure it's been to be "back up and fully running" after less than an hour once replacement parts (usually a drive) have been sourced is indescribable.  [Several of my clients who have experienced a catastrophic failure after I got them turned on to doing regular, cyclic full system image backups have said the same.  One, in particular, who was a screen reader user.]
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

Zel Iscel
 

Thanks Ryan. Once again, you have been very informative. 😊

 

 

image001.jpg

 

Zel Iscel

Disability Specialist

Inclusive World

Mobile: 0413813885

Email: zel@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, 15 February 2022 6:45 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

Justin,

The size of a backup drive that "fits your needs" depends on several things:

1. How much data (and I'm including the OS and everything else) do you have to backup?
2. How many backups (if any more than one) do you wish to keep.  Some people keep, for example, their backups from the last 3 months (taken monthly) or 3 weeks (if taken weekly) so you'd need something that can hold X number of backups of Y size.

Below I'm going to paste a tutorial I've written for my clients to educate them on how to make a smart choice as far as backup drive size.  I consider having a drive with a capacity far in excess of what you need the purchase of a dead asset.  While a little room to grow never hurts, if your computer has 250 GB of data lock, stock, and barrel then a 1 TB drive is far in excess of what you need.  Buy whatever you want, though, provided you have at least the space you actually need.
-----------------------------

How to Choose the Right External Backup Drive for You

Bigger is not necessarily better, as almost no one needs to keep backups that are over two months or two backup cycles (if you take them more frequently) old.  Tons of extra capacity that you don’t use does you no good.  But if you hit a good sale where a drive with a much larger capacity than you need is available at a very low price, don’t hesitate to buy that one.  They keep getting less and less expensive with time, and are already quite cheap.

What follows presumes that the computer you’re intending to back up has pretty much all of the data you’re likely to want to back up already on it, with some room to grow over time.

1. Open File Explorer, and select This PC in the folder tree on the left side.  If your normal view is not the Details View, switch to that view temporarily then switch back to your preferred view afterward.  Look at your system drive, which is virtually certain to be the C: drive with the name Windows.

2. Look for your Total Size and Free space, 915 GB and 251 GB respectively in this example, then subtract the Free Space from the Total Size.  In this case, that value would be 664 GB.  This tells you how much space you’re actually using (and I’m using a lot more than many people do).  Multiply that value by two, in this case:  1328 GB

3. Backup drives are generally sold in sizes that start around 250 GB and go up, usually 500 GB (two times the space), 1 TB (4 times the space, and 1000 GB), 2 TB (2000 GB), 3 TB (3000 GB), and 4 TB (4000 GB).  Pick a size that is approximately the same as that “multiplied by 2” figure above.  Since I am above 1000 GB, I want a 2 TB drive or larger.  You may not need one nearly so large.

That’s it, at least for the basics of choosing.  These days external USB backup drives that are 1 TB in size can often be had for under $75, often under $50 on sale, so this is not a major investment.

For the purposes of backup, choose an external hard disk drive (HDD) rather than a solid-state drive (SSD).  Although SSDs are the thing to have in your computer, they are not nearly as stable as a long-term backup device as a HDD is, and HDDs are much cheaper for the amount of space you get.

These drives are available at Staples, Best Buy, Costco, Walmart, Amazon, and many other brick and mortar stores and online vendors, so shop around for who may have the one you need on sale at the moment.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

Mike Pietruk
 

Steve

You raise a valid issue with image back-ups so having the data elsewhere
is also a requisite.
Right now, I have a sort of ideal situation where both my main desktop and
laptop are more or less identical from a hardware standpoint where we were
able to take the image of the desktop and got the laptop to be more or
less identical settingswise from that image.
So, I will continue with these machines, --- though they are a couple of
years old -- as long as possible.
Of course, as you are in a business situation and I'm retired only having
to please myself pc-wise, I have more flexibility and am willing to make
certain compromises if I have to.

But, the key point, I believe, is that both image back-ups and data
backups are important if something goes awry so one can get themselves
back to a normal state as easily and quickly as practical.


moderated Re: back ups

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I never ever back up a system image. I’d sooner reset Windows and reinstall if things go wrong. I just back up personal data.

 

Problem with a system image is it will likely fail if you have to buy a new machine, because of different hardware.

 

All the best


Steve

 

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From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 14 February 2022 18:39
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

Online backups are fine if all you need to back up is data and you have a good Internet connection.  I often recommend them to my clients mainly because I know they won’t do anything more. Personally I use Brian‘s approach mainly because my Internet is slow DSL and I often wanna restore a whole system not just the data on it



On Feb 14, 2022, at 11:45, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 12:35 PM, James Homuth wrote:

What’s more important? Speed, or reliability?

-
Both.

Many of us don't have 15 hours to let our machines sit and try to backup to the cloud.  Local backups are also not unreliable, either.

Almost any computer user will, at some point in their life, have at least one system drive failure.  Having a full system image backup, on any media, is far more important insurance than the choice of media is.  That's one of the reasons I have two backup drives and alternate between them each month.  Belt and braces approach, but all local, which is my preference, but need not be anyone else's.

I don't get why the reaction to what I posted anyway.  It is a consideration, and a legitimate one.  I didn't tell anyone where their personal dividing line for the tradeoff should be, just that they need to be aware of the tradeoff.  Now they are.  Let the decision fall with the decision-makers.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

Steve Nutt
 

That’s true, and besides, your computer can happily back up while you are working, so speed really isn’t an issue nowadays.

 

All the best


Steve

 

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Hertfordshire

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E: steve@...

W: https://www.comproom.co.uk

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Homuth
Sent: 14 February 2022 17:35
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

I do not have super fast internet, and several TB of data to back up. What’s more important? Speed, or reliability? Sure it took a while, but that several TB of data is backed up now. If any single one of my drives fails, I’m covered.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 14, 2022 12:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

Not that I don't think cloud-based backup isn't a great idea, because it is, but before anyone considers going that route you need to have very fast internet service indeed if you have any substantial amount of data to back-up.

My own system disk contains about 600 GB of data, and that takes hours to back up at USB 3.0 speeds to a local hard drive, and those speeds are virtually certain to be much faster than a very great many of us have with our internet service.

If you've got gigabit service, then, by all means, consider cloud-based backup.  It gives you the double advantage of having a backup and having that backup not colocated with the machine being backed up, so if disaster strikes with something like a house fire, you are not nearly so likely to lose your backup as you are if you have it only on a local drive (even if you store that drive in a fireproof safe).  But if you have slow-ish to truly slow internet service and substantial data to back up, cloud-based backup is not likely going to be a good fit.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: Thunderbird with Jaws

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 10:33 PM, Glenda Ray wrote:
Thanks Brian, I've been trying to find a way to hide or even just move that column but I'm not getting anywhere, do you happen to know how?
-
Glenda,

With NVDA, yes.  With JAWS, no, and that's because I haven't dealt with JAWS paired with Thunderbird in several years.  If you wish to contact me privately for the NVDA solution, and you're familiar with it, please do.  That wouldn't be on-topic here.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: Thunderbird with Jaws

Glenda Ray
 

Thanks Brian, I've been trying to find a way to hide or even just move that column but I'm not getting anywhere, do you happen to know how?


On 2/14/2022 6:59 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Glenda,

See the topic, NVDA says 0 in Thunderbird, if you want more information on this issue, as it's not screen reader specific.

It appears that one of the recent updates to Thunderbird inserted a column, the Junk indicator I believe, as the first item in the message list displayed in the Inbox.  Because my Thunderbird columns were long ago customized, and I don't routinely use a screen reader, I don't have firsthand experience with seeing what that newly inserted column actually is.

I cannot recall what support JAWS has in regard to changing the Thunderbird columns that are actually on display and the order they're displayed in, but you need to check what columns are on display, get rid of any you don't actually want displayed, and arrange them in the order you'd prefer to have them read.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

K0LNY
 


One thing I found with Open Drive, if you use your context menu and sync the drive to open drive, it backs up faster with no errors, where copying and pasting with multiple large files and folders otherwise, tend to fail.
Open Drive is unlimited space for a hundred bucks a year.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: Chris Hill
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 8:06 PM
Subject: Re: back ups

I think I have a pretty good solution for our home needs.  One drive gets odd months, one gets even, they each hold about a year's worth.  I then have another drive kept elsewhere that I try and hit twice a year.

I tested the cloud thing by trying to use the 1tb I get with office 365.  I could never manage to load a large zip file to it on my dsl with 2mb upload.  If I wanted to pay a bit more, use two phone lines and hope the company could maintain a more complex system, I could get 8mb up.  Since my provider has been bought out, I'm not even going to try.



On 2/14/2022 15:37, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:39 PM, John Covici wrote:
You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?
-
Actually, you don't, but if you want to be entirely safe you would want one backup that you have stored at a location that's not the same as your computer, even if the one at the same location is in a fireproof box.

I actually know of people who have one backup drive sitting in their desks and another that they keep in the trunk of their car, or in their detached garage, or the like.  After they take their backup they copy the image file off of "the drive that stays home" on to the other one and promptly stash it "not at home."

Heaven knows that cloud backup is a lot more convenient if you've got sufficient upload speed for the throughput required.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin



moderated Re: back ups

Chris Hill
 

I think I have a pretty good solution for our home needs.  One drive gets odd months, one gets even, they each hold about a year's worth.  I then have another drive kept elsewhere that I try and hit twice a year.

I tested the cloud thing by trying to use the 1tb I get with office 365.  I could never manage to load a large zip file to it on my dsl with 2mb upload.  If I wanted to pay a bit more, use two phone lines and hope the company could maintain a more complex system, I could get 8mb up.  Since my provider has been bought out, I'm not even going to try.



On 2/14/2022 15:37, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:39 PM, John Covici wrote:
You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?
-
Actually, you don't, but if you want to be entirely safe you would want one backup that you have stored at a location that's not the same as your computer, even if the one at the same location is in a fireproof box.

I actually know of people who have one backup drive sitting in their desks and another that they keep in the trunk of their car, or in their detached garage, or the like.  After they take their backup they copy the image file off of "the drive that stays home" on to the other one and promptly stash it "not at home."

Heaven knows that cloud backup is a lot more convenient if you've got sufficient upload speed for the throughput required.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin



moderated Re: Thunderbird with Jaws

 

Glenda,

See the topic, NVDA says 0 in Thunderbird, if you want more information on this issue, as it's not screen reader specific.

It appears that one of the recent updates to Thunderbird inserted a column, the Junk indicator I believe, as the first item in the message list displayed in the Inbox.  Because my Thunderbird columns were long ago customized, and I don't routinely use a screen reader, I don't have firsthand experience with seeing what that newly inserted column actually is.

I cannot recall what support JAWS has in regard to changing the Thunderbird columns that are actually on display and the order they're displayed in, but you need to check what columns are on display, get rid of any you don't actually want displayed, and arrange them in the order you'd prefer to have them read.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Thunderbird with Jaws

Glenda Ray
 

Hello,


While going through emails in Thunderbird Jaws keeps saying zero before reading email information. Does anybody have suggestions of how to stop it?


moderated Scripps

James Lockwood
 

A few questions. Where is a good place to get Jaws scripts and does anyone know of a script for jaws making Verizon messenger for windows more accessible


moderated Re: back ups

 

Justin,

The size of a backup drive that "fits your needs" depends on several things:

1. How much data (and I'm including the OS and everything else) do you have to backup?
2. How many backups (if any more than one) do you wish to keep.  Some people keep, for example, their backups from the last 3 months (taken monthly) or 3 weeks (if taken weekly) so you'd need something that can hold X number of backups of Y size.

Below I'm going to paste a tutorial I've written for my clients to educate them on how to make a smart choice as far as backup drive size.  I consider having a drive with a capacity far in excess of what you need the purchase of a dead asset.  While a little room to grow never hurts, if your computer has 250 GB of data lock, stock, and barrel then a 1 TB drive is far in excess of what you need.  Buy whatever you want, though, provided you have at least the space you actually need.
-----------------------------

How to Choose the Right External Backup Drive for You

Bigger is not necessarily better, as almost no one needs to keep backups that are over two months or two backup cycles (if you take them more frequently) old.  Tons of extra capacity that you don’t use does you no good.  But if you hit a good sale where a drive with a much larger capacity than you need is available at a very low price, don’t hesitate to buy that one.  They keep getting less and less expensive with time, and are already quite cheap.

What follows presumes that the computer you’re intending to back up has pretty much all of the data you’re likely to want to back up already on it, with some room to grow over time.

1. Open File Explorer, and select This PC in the folder tree on the left side.  If your normal view is not the Details View, switch to that view temporarily then switch back to your preferred view afterward.  Look at your system drive, which is virtually certain to be the C: drive with the name Windows.

2. Look for your Total Size and Free space, 915 GB and 251 GB respectively in this example, then subtract the Free Space from the Total Size.  In this case, that value would be 664 GB.  This tells you how much space you’re actually using (and I’m using a lot more than many people do).  Multiply that value by two, in this case:  1328 GB

3. Backup drives are generally sold in sizes that start around 250 GB and go up, usually 500 GB (two times the space), 1 TB (4 times the space, and 1000 GB), 2 TB (2000 GB), 3 TB (3000 GB), and 4 TB (4000 GB).  Pick a size that is approximately the same as that “multiplied by 2” figure above.  Since I am above 1000 GB, I want a 2 TB drive or larger.  You may not need one nearly so large.

That’s it, at least for the basics of choosing.  These days external USB backup drives that are 1 TB in size can often be had for under $75, often under $50 on sale, so this is not a major investment.

For the purposes of backup, choose an external hard disk drive (HDD) rather than a solid-state drive (SSD).  Although SSDs are the thing to have in your computer, they are not nearly as stable as a long-term backup device as a HDD is, and HDDs are much cheaper for the amount of space you get.

These drives are available at Staples, Best Buy, Costco, Walmart, Amazon, and many other brick and mortar stores and online vendors, so shop around for who may have the one you need on sale at the moment.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

Justin Williams
 

Okay, then I really should spend the 18 dollars for a terabyte harddrive to get the most out of a back up?

 

Which is fine with me, I have no problem with doing that.

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 4:34 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:48 PM, James Homuth wrote:

Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.

-
My computer is up and running 24/7 most days, but when I'm using it I don't need an ongoing backup slowing things down, and it does because of all of the disk I/O.

I kick off my system image backups before I retire for the evening so that they will occur while I'm asleep, and be completely done before I am sitting in front of the computer again.  That would never be the case, for me (and, for many others), were I to be using cloud-based backup.

But with this, I'm done.  The speed issue, and what it means, has been addressed.  People now are making an informed decision.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

James Bentley
 

If I backed up two laptops and one iPhone twice a month, I would probably get a warning from my ISP telling me that I went over my data limit for the month.

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Homuth
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 1:48 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

>Many of us don't have 15 hours to let our machines sit and try to backup to the cloud.  Local backups are also not unreliable, either.

 

Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.

 

Also: what reaction? I was simply stating the problem isn’t as significant as your post made it sound.


moderated Re: back ups

James Bentley
 

I use 3 small fire proof boxes to store all of my external drives. These
small fire proof boxes are then placed in a large heavy duty fire proof box.

I hope I do not have to have a fire to find out if two fire boxes really
work.

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Covici
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 1:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What
happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?

On Mon, 14 Feb 2022 12:35:15 -0500,
James Homuth wrote:

[1 <text/plain; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
I do not have super fast internet, and several TB of data to back up.
What?s more important? Speed, or reliability? Sure it took a while, but that
several TB of data is backed up now. If any single one of my drives fails,
I?m covered.



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 14, 2022 12:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups



Not that I don't think cloud-based backup isn't a great idea, because it
is, but before anyone considers going that route you need to have very fast
internet service indeed if you have any substantial amount of data to
back-up.

My own system disk contains about 600 GB of data, and that takes hours to
back up at USB 3.0 speeds to a local hard drive, and those speeds are
virtually certain to be much faster than a very great many of us have with
our internet service.

If you've got gigabit service, then, by all means, consider cloud-based
backup. It gives you the double advantage of having a backup and having
that backup not colocated with the machine being backed up, so if disaster
strikes with something like a house fire, you are not nearly so likely to
lose your backup as you are if you have it only on a local drive (even if
you store that drive in a fireproof safe). But if you have slow-ish to
truly slow internet service and substantial data to back up, cloud-based
backup is not likely going to be a good fit.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

~ Kim Chernin








[2 <text/html; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...


moderated Re: back ups

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:39 PM, John Covici wrote:
You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?
-
Actually, you don't, but if you want to be entirely safe you would want one backup that you have stored at a location that's not the same as your computer, even if the one at the same location is in a fireproof box.

I actually know of people who have one backup drive sitting in their desks and another that they keep in the trunk of their car, or in their detached garage, or the like.  After they take their backup they copy the image file off of "the drive that stays home" on to the other one and promptly stash it "not at home."

Heaven knows that cloud backup is a lot more convenient if you've got sufficient upload speed for the throughput required.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


moderated Re: back ups

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:48 PM, James Homuth wrote:
Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.
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My computer is up and running 24/7 most days, but when I'm using it I don't need an ongoing backup slowing things down, and it does because of all of the disk I/O.

I kick off my system image backups before I retire for the evening so that they will occur while I'm asleep, and be completely done before I am sitting in front of the computer again.  That would never be the case, for me (and, for many others), were I to be using cloud-based backup.

But with this, I'm done.  The speed issue, and what it means, has been addressed.  People now are making an informed decision.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin

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