Date   

moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

For the record, I can confirm that SHIFT+F10 and SHIFT+Applications/Context Menu Key both produce precisely the same extended context menu with Copy as Path as one option.

A press of Applications/Context Menu Key alone does not.  So I've just experienced my first use of a modifier key in conjunction with Applications/Context Menu Key making it behave differently.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 03:34 PM, JM Casey wrote:
I still say that shift-applications key does nothing except activate the applications key.
-
I'm actually going to grab one of my USB keyboards with an applications/menu key later to test out that theory.

I've never experienced a modifier key doing anything with that key, either.  But as today's conversation has clearly indicated, there are certain obscurities than any given one of us (or, probably, many of us) have never encountered.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

I still say that shift-applications key does nothing except activate the applications key.

Unless some keyboard models are just weird and the applications key is maybe the one key on the keyboard that won’t accept some sort of modifier?

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: June 23, 2021 03:32 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 02:23 PM, Mario wrote:

it isn't a mistake because I tested it before I added my 2 cents.

-
And I didn't, because I can't.

But it is not unreasonable to have believe that could have been a "write-o."  I've seen plenty of them before, and one could (and actually should) consider what I wrote as an indirect request for clarification.

And as subsequent discussion has detailed, this is one of the very rare times when SHIFT+F10 and the Applications/Menu Key press are not equivalent.

I have also acknowledged that I was in error.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 02:23 PM, Mario wrote:
it isn't a mistake because I tested it before I added my 2 cents.
-
And I didn't, because I can't.

But it is not unreasonable to have believe that could have been a "write-o."  I've seen plenty of them before, and one could (and actually should) consider what I wrote as an indirect request for clarification.

And as subsequent discussion has detailed, this is one of the very rare times when SHIFT+F10 and the Applications/Menu Key press are not equivalent.

I have also acknowledged that I was in error.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

All of that’s certainly true.

Of course many blind users use 9and even rely on) the desktop to open programmes and even tend to place some of their fil i o. I gues there is a certain amount of individusnal experience preference in this matter. While I’ve grown used to and even appreciate the boons that windows offers, old habits die hard – the tree-like dtiful metaphor for getting around the computer, butall the GUI attempt to make a computer “look like something else” just seem like extra baggage to me most of the time. Thankfully Windows offers a variety of different options for accessing things, and a person doesn’t have to use these sorts of spacial metaphors if he doesn’t want to.

Remember microsoft Bob?  It was designed to make y a use isctureury strtocrees

 

Our computer look like…a house, with all the applications theron being functions of the home. Lol…I think even the computer illiterate elder folks in the 1990s probably saw this as unnecessary pandering (Bob just never took off, despite mS betting on it being a next Big Thing).

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: June 23, 2021 01:25 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 12:57 PM, JM Casey wrote:

I totally understand the visual appeal, especially when you can move items and put them exactly where you want on that imaginary surface, that doesn’t offer an advantage for me.

-
And this is a perfect encapsulation, from "the flip side of the coin," of my oft repeated sentiments:

1.  Sometimes, there is no real and complete substitute for sight.

2.  All of accessibility is a workaround, substituting one sensory modality for another, and the two are in no way able to be 100% equivalent.

What's way more useful if you can't see is often diametrically opposed to what is when you can, and vice versa.  And heaven knows, I have to at least try my best to keep that in mind at all times when working with a screen reader user (and many of whom have taught me "the greater efficiencies for someone who's blind" that I had not previously known).

One of the great rewards, for me, out of my experience as a screen reader tutor has been what I've learned from my students, not just the satisfaction I get from what they've learned from me.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

Mario
 

it isn't a mistake because I tested it before I added my 2 cents.
just pressing the applications key without the shift key does not offer the copy as path command.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Subject: Tips for File Explorer
Date: Wednesday, June 23, 2021, 11:59 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 11:49 AM, Mario wrote:

easier way is to press shift+applications key or shift+f10 and then
A to copy as path

-
I'd blown right by "Copy as Path" because I'd forgotten that's the
terminology used. That's definitely easier.

I do think you have a mistake, though. You can hit either the
Applications/Menu Key (alone, no shift) or SHIFT+F10 (which is
functionally the same on keyboards both with and without an
Applications/Menu Key), followed by A.
--

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you
are not.*

~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 12:57 PM, JM Casey wrote:
I totally understand the visual appeal, especially when you can move items and put them exactly where you want on that imaginary surface, that doesn’t offer an advantage for me.
-
And this is a perfect encapsulation, from "the flip side of the coin," of my oft repeated sentiments:

1.  Sometimes, there is no real and complete substitute for sight.

2.  All of accessibility is a workaround, substituting one sensory modality for another, and the two are in no way able to be 100% equivalent.

What's way more useful if you can't see is often diametrically opposed to what is when you can, and vice versa.  And heaven knows, I have to at least try my best to keep that in mind at all times when working with a screen reader user (and many of whom have taught me "the greater efficiencies for someone who's blind" that I had not previously known).

One of the great rewards, for me, out of my experience as a screen reader tutor has been what I've learned from my students, not just the satisfaction I get from what they've learned from me.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

Yeah..since the shift-f10 invocation sometimes gives you more options than the mere applications key, but the reverse never seems to be true, it probably makes sense for most people to just get into the habit of using shift-f10 all of the time, especially as keyboards increasingly don’t seem to have that applications key anymore.

Interesting how back in the old days, keyboards had neither a windows key nor an applications key. Then at some point in the windows evolution, keyboard manufacturers started adding them. The Windows key will stick around, but it seems the applications key may have just been a flash in the pan. ;)

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: June 23, 2021 12:51 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 12:21 PM, JM Casey wrote:

It isn’t available just by pressing the applications key, though. You have to use shift f10. I don’t know why this is and it is somewhat annoying that the two menus are sometimes inexplicably different.

-
Nor do I.  I, too, have encountered (and documented, somewhere) several very rare occasions where the Applications/Menu Key and SHIFT+F10 are not 100% functionally equivalent.

I do not have an Applications/Menu Key on any of my laptops, and Microsoft's own documentation states (incorrectly) that these two invocation options for the context menu are functionally equivalent.  I have no choice but to use SHIFT+F10 most of the time.  Even some of my USB keyboards lack an Applications/Menu Key.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

Ah, well..it’s not so much the case, for me, and it gives me the feeling of “hunting around” for something rather than knowing exactly where it is – the latter is a feeling I like to have.

Of course if something is buried ten folders deep I probably wouldn’t type out the whole path, but otherwise, it’s really fast and extremely efficient, I find. Either just opening a folder location, or going directly to a file and having it automatically open in its requisite programme, has improved my windows experience 100%. I don’t use the desktop at all anymore, except for the odd ctrl-alt hotkey (which of course doesn’t require being on the desktop to use). It’s always felt counter-intuitive and while I totally understand the visual appeal, especially when you can move items and put them exactly where you want on that imaginary surface, that doesn’t offer an advantage for me.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: June 23, 2021 12:47 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 12:31 PM, JM Casey wrote:

My favourite explorer thing, which I genuinely am baffled more people don’t do instead of navigating through a familiar folder structure, is to open a window to a folder by hitting windows key + r for “run”, and typing in the path.

-
Well, all I can say is that you have a better memory, are a better typist, and/or have a far simpler folder structure on your machine than I do.

My file systems are like a collection of filing cabinets in various rooms where the "depth" of those rooms can, on many occasions, be extensive.

And I realize the fact that I can see definitely has a bearing here, as point and click is incredibly quick to drill down in File Explorer.  But unless you happen to have a list of "very frequently accessed folders" that you could cut and paste from for the WinKey+R window, if you're dealing with a complex file system that's likely way, way slower than navigating File Explorer, particularly if typos are taken into account.  For things like Downloads, opening File Explorer and hitting D a couple of times gets you straight to the Desktop and Downloads entries, and the corresponding first letter nav for all the libraries.  It's very fast, far faster for me than typing out even the word "downloads". 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 12:21 PM, JM Casey wrote:
It isn’t available just by pressing the applications key, though. You have to use shift f10. I don’t know why this is and it is somewhat annoying that the two menus are sometimes inexplicably different.
-
Nor do I.  I, too, have encountered (and documented, somewhere) several very rare occasions where the Applications/Menu Key and SHIFT+F10 are not 100% functionally equivalent.

I do not have an Applications/Menu Key on any of my laptops, and Microsoft's own documentation states (incorrectly) that these two invocation options for the context menu are functionally equivalent.  I have no choice but to use SHIFT+F10 most of the time.  Even some of my USB keyboards lack an Applications/Menu Key.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 12:31 PM, JM Casey wrote:
My favourite explorer thing, which I genuinely am baffled more people don’t do instead of navigating through a familiar folder structure, is to open a window to a folder by hitting windows key + r for “run”, and typing in the path.
-
Well, all I can say is that you have a better memory, are a better typist, and/or have a far simpler folder structure on your machine than I do.

My file systems are like a collection of filing cabinets in various rooms where the "depth" of those rooms can, on many occasions, be extensive.

And I realize the fact that I can see definitely has a bearing here, as point and click is incredibly quick to drill down in File Explorer.  But unless you happen to have a list of "very frequently accessed folders" that you could cut and paste from for the WinKey+R window, if you're dealing with a complex file system that's likely way, way slower than navigating File Explorer, particularly if typos are taken into account.  For things like Downloads, opening File Explorer and hitting D a couple of times gets you straight to the Desktop and Downloads entries, and the corresponding first letter nav for all the libraries.  It's very fast, far faster for me than typing out even the word "downloads". 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

I don’t’ really understand the first question either. Are you having trouble selecting files?

 

My favourite explorer thing, which I genuinely am baffled more people don’t do instead of navigating through a familiar folder structure, is to open a window to a folder by hitting windows key + r for “run”, and typing in the path.

For special folders in your user directory, you don’t even need thf ull path

For example, just hit windows + r and type “downloads”, and there you go.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: June 23, 2021 11:25 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tips for File Explorer

 

I'm struggling a bit with File Explorer and wonder if folks had some observations or advice about using it? For example, in terms of the task of navigating the file system, perhaps it's easiest to stay in the multi-select item view and use alt + up and enter to go up or down the folder structure.

Another example, is does anyone have advice for learning the file path to the current location? I do alt + d which moves the focus to an edit combo with the file path. But I have trouble getting to itself. I'm not sure if there's a better way and I'm missing something.


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

In addition to this, if you just want the folder path (not including the filename) you can always just hit alt-d, then ctrl-c to copy. It works like an address bar in a web browser.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: June 23, 2021 11:37 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

I'm not quite sure what you're getting at with your first question.

As far as getting the full path for any selected file or files, ALT+H,CP, will copy the full path to the file(s) to the clipboard for pasting wherever you might need it.  If you have multiple files selected, the paths, when pasted, will be one to a line.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

JM Casey
 

Hey Brian and all.

Copy in path is a great thing, indeed.

It isn’t available just by pressing the applications key, though. You have to use shift f10. I don’t know why this is and it is somewhat annoying that the two menus are sometimes inexplicably different.

Shift applications key, though, has the same affect as just pressing the applications key.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: June 23, 2021 11:59 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 11:49 AM, Mario wrote:

easier way is to press shift+applications key or shift+f10 and then A to copy as path

-
I'd blown right by "Copy as Path" because I'd forgotten that's the terminology used.  That's definitely easier.

I do think you have a mistake, though.  You can hit either the Applications/Menu Key (alone, no shift) or SHIFT+F10 (which is functionally the same on keyboards both with and without an Applications/Menu Key), followed by A.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

Mike B.
 


Hi Brian,
 
Check out the following about the extended context menu and the, Shift + F10, or the, Shift + aplications key, keystrokes.
 

https://www.askvg.com/tip-customize-hidden-extended-send-to-menu-in-windows-add-or-remove-shortcuts/
 
[Tip] Customize Hidden “Extended Send To” Menu in Windows, Add or Remove Shortcuts
 
When Windows Vista was released, Microsoft added a new feature to the OS which is called "Extended Context Menu". Context menu is the menu which is shown
when you right-click on an item and extended context menu is an advanced form of it. Extended context menu can be accessed by press and hold SHIFT key
and then right-click on an item.
 
Extended context menu adds a few extra options to normal context menu which are only shown when you press and hold Shift key while right-clicking otherwise
you'll get normal context menu.
 
You can check these extended context menus anywhere in Windows such as Desktop, Windows Explorer, etc. Just press and hold Shift key and right-click and
you'll see some new options in the context menu such as open command prompt here, copy as path, etc.
 
Extended context menu feature is not only present in Windows Vista but also present in all Windows OS which were released after Windows Vista such as Windows
7 and Windows 8.
 
The same extended context menu concept applies to good old "
Send To"
menu. Almost all Windows users use "Send To" feature, its one of the most useful and widely used feature of Windows OS. It allows you to quickly copy files,
folder, etc to other places such as Bluetooth device, Desktop, DVD drive, etc.
 
When you right-click on an item and select "Send To" menu, it shows the following items by default:
 
list of 7 items
• Bluetooth device
• Compressed (zipped) folder
• Desktop (create shortcut)
• Documents
• Fax recipient
• Mail recipient
• DVD Drive
list end
 
Number of items might be different for different systems.
 
Have you ever tried to access "Extended Send To" menu in Windows? Press and hold SHIFT key and then right-click on an item and select "Send To" menu. Now
you'll get many other shortcuts present in the menu as shown in following screenshot:
 
As you can see in the above screenshot, there are several extra shortcuts present in "Extended Send To" menu such as Contacts, Downloads, Favorites, Searches,
etc.
 
The normal "Send To" menu can be customized by opening "SendTo" folder and there you can add or remove desired shortcuts.
 
To access "SendTo" folder, type shell:sendto in RUN dialog box or Explorer addressbar and press Enter. It'll open "SendTo" folder:
 
You can see in the above image, all default shortcuts which are shown in "Send To" menu are present in "SendTo" folder. You can delete an item to immediately
remove it from "Send To" menu or you can copy any desired shortcut in the folder to add it in "Send To" menu.
 
Now the question comes how to customize "Extended Send To" menu? Recently an AskVG reader "J.R. Rickman" asked us about customizing "Extended Send To"
menu:
 
I have tried for sometime now to edit my "Send to Extended menu", this is the one you would use: "Shift + Send to" from the Context Menu. I have tried
a great number of third party tools and none have given me the ability to edit any of the options that show up in the "Extended-Send to menu." I have also
used the "Shell: Send to" command which only shows the listing for the standard Send to list (not the Extended list). So of course, I know there is a way
to accomplish the editing process, but I am not sure if it is in the Registry or in a file that I cannot find. At any rate, if you have a fix this problem,
I would certainly be interested.
 
Actually this "Extended Send To" menu doesn't store its shortcuts in Windows Registry. Customizing the menu is very easy if you know the process.
 
Today in this tutorial, we are going to tell you a simple way to customize "Extended Send To" menu in Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8. With the
help of this tutorial, you'll be able to add new shortcuts to "Extended Send To" menu as well as remove existing shortcuts from "Extended Send To" menu.
The beauty of this trick is the newly added shortcuts will only appear if you press and hold SHIFT key while right-clicking on an item otherwise the shortcuts
will not appear. So it'll not increase the size of "Send To" menu.
 
So without wasting time lets start the tutorial:
 
1. "Extended Send To" menu shows the extra shortcuts which are taken right from your User Profile folder. All shortcuts which are present in your user
folder are shown in "Extended Send To" menu. Can't believe? Here is the proof:
 
Type %userprofile% or . (yes, a single dot) in RUN dialog box and press Enter. It'll open your user profile folder which will contain following items:
 
As you can see in the above screenshot, all shortcuts which are present in the user profile folder are visible in "Extended Send To" menu shown in image
 
2. If you want to add a new item to "Extended Send To" menu, simply create a shortcut of it in your user profile folder. For example, we have created a
new folder "Personal Stuff" in our user profile folder:
 
And it immediately gets added to "Extended Send To" menu as shown in following screenshot:
 
3. If you want to remove a shortcut from "Extended Send To" menu, simply delete it from your user profile folder. For example, we are deleting 3 shortcuts
from user profile folder: Contacts, Downloads and Saved Games:
 
And Windows immediately removes the shortcuts from "Extended Send To" menu as shown in following screenshot:
 
PS: Make sure to take a backup of the folder before deleting it so that you can restore it later or can access your data.
 
So you can see customizing "Extended Send To" menu is very easy task. You can add any desired shortcut or remove any unwanted shortcut from the menu without
editing Registry or any system file.
 
Did you already know about "Extended Send To" menu? Do you use it regularly? Feel free to share your feedback in your comment...
 
 
Stay safe & take care.  Mike.
Just once, I want a username and password prompt to say:  "Close Enough!"
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, June 23, 2021 8:59 AM
Subject: Re: Tips for File Explorer

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 11:49 AM, Mario wrote:
easier way is to press shift+applications key or shift+f10 and then A to copy as path
-
I'd blown right by "Copy as Path" because I'd forgotten that's the terminology used.  That's definitely easier.

I do think you have a mistake, though.  You can hit either the Applications/Menu Key (alone, no shift) or SHIFT+F10 (which is functionally the same on keyboards both with and without an Applications/Menu Key), followed by A.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 11:49 AM, Mario wrote:
easier way is to press shift+applications key or shift+f10 and then A to copy as path
-
I'd blown right by "Copy as Path" because I'd forgotten that's the terminology used.  That's definitely easier.

I do think you have a mistake, though.  You can hit either the Applications/Menu Key (alone, no shift) or SHIFT+F10 (which is functionally the same on keyboards both with and without an Applications/Menu Key), followed by A.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

Mario
 

another and easier way is to press shift+applications key or shift+f10 and then A to copy as path which will place the path to the file's location in the clipboard.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Subject: Tips for File Explorer
Date: Wednesday, June 23, 2021, 11:37 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
I'm not quite sure what you're getting at with your first question.

As far as getting the full path for any selected file or files,
ALT+H,CP, will copy the full path to the file(s) to the clipboard for
pasting wherever you might need it.  If you have multiple files
selected, the paths, when pasted, will be one to a line.
--

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you
are not.*

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tips for File Explorer

 

I'm not quite sure what you're getting at with your first question.

As far as getting the full path for any selected file or files, ALT+H,CP, will copy the full path to the file(s) to the clipboard for pasting wherever you might need it.  If you have multiple files selected, the paths, when pasted, will be one to a line.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Tips for File Explorer

Mark
 

I'm struggling a bit with File Explorer and wonder if folks had some observations or advice about using it? For example, in terms of the task of navigating the file system, perhaps it's easiest to stay in the multi-select item view and use alt + up and enter to go up or down the folder structure.

Another example, is does anyone have advice for learning the file path to the current location? I do alt + d which moves the focus to an edit combo with the file path. But I have trouble getting to itself. I'm not sure if there's a better way and I'm missing something.


moderated JAWS and Express Scribe

Phillip Gross
 

Has anyone found a good way of keeping track of where they are in an Audio file for time coding purposes? The best way I’ve found to do it so far is rather tedious. I will transcribe the file, then I will go back and place the time stamps.

 

In an hour long file in which the client wants time stamps every 30 seconds this gets really old really fast. That is 120 time stamps. That means I have to find the next 30 second mark, find the end of the next sentence, copy the time, go to word, find the same spot, paste the time stamp, and go back to Express Scribe and do it all again.

 

Please tell me there’s a better way to keep track of where I am while I transcribe?

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