Date   

moderated Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

leonard morris
 

Thank you for the audio description of the braille display appreciate it. However, when the page is loading in it’s almost completed I get a not secured statement I’m Safari. I hope this is not a problem for you doesn’t seem to be a real issue with the site I just thought you might want to be aware of it.

Every country has an identity, history, custom, and culture. It’s a unique landscape in determining how its people Live, work, and play.


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Richard Turner <richardturner42@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2021 12:42:01 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?
 

I put up my own audio description of the Orbit Reader 40 along with my attempt at a recording of the two keyboards being used to compare the sound levels.

You can find them on my web site under the Orbit Research Information page, here:

Orbit Research Information (turner42.com)

 

HTH,

 

Richard

"The highest reward for a person's toil is not what they get for it, but what they become by it."

- John Ruskin, 1819-1900

 

Web site: www.turner42.com

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Cristóbal
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 5:50 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

 

This is helpful.

I just find it odd that there seems to be very little out there on this particular model. Even YouTube doesn’t really have anything. Just that one French language video JI linked to. Tons of reviews and postings about the 20 cell displays, but no dice on the 40 cell one but for the generic postings of specs and order form .

Thanks,

 

 

Cristóbal

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:25 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

 

There has been a lot of discussion about it on the Orbit Reader list of course.

I will write something up for AppleVis at some point soon.

But, starting from physical comparisons.

1. It is no louder while refreshing.

2. The keys are louder than those on the 20.

3. The keys are laid out more like you would expect from other displays, in that the 8 dots are kind of fanned out ergonomically. So unlike the 20, dots 7 and 8 are very comfortable for your little fingers to land on.

4. The space bar is on a slightly angled lip at the front, then the braille cells, then the keyboard.

5. there are cursor routing buttons above each cell.

6. It has a USB slot so you can use a thumb drive for alternate storage.

On my web site, I have samples of the alarm sounds under the heading Orbit Research information. 

 

I really like the display. Like the 20, it is the best feeling braille of any display.

You do have to install a driver to run it with JAWS so it emulates the Vario Ultra 40. Vispero says it is up to Orbit Research to fix the driver ...

But it works great with Jaws, or NVDA.

 

 

 

Richard 

"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 

 

On Apr 22, 2021, at 2:46 PM, Cristóbal <cristobalmuli@...> wrote:



Hello list,

So I was thinking of upgrading to the Orbit Reader 40 display, but haven’t really been able to come across any reviews on the product. Write ups on the Orbit Reader 20 Plus yes, but not much for the 40. Can I just assume that they’re the same, but for amount of Braille cells?

There was one review I came across on Apple Vis but it was more focused on the device's sound than anything else. I did find one YouTube video, but it’s in French and well… I don’t speak French.

I was thinking of the Mantis 40, but honestly, I’m pretty happy with my mechanical keyboard for my desktop and I already have an 80 cell display connected to it, so this would be a more portable option for my laptop and iPhone for reading mostly. I don’t need another keyboard for that.

Anyway, if anyone’s got an Orbit Reader 40, I’d be curious to know their thoughts on how it’s holding up and general usage.

Thanks,

Cristóbal

 


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Madison Martin
 

I also have a Focus 40 display and couldn’t emagine not having a braille display since I’ve used one for as long as I’ve used a computer. I find them very useful for editing, especially if you get one with cursor routing buttons. I do hope that the responses that you’ve received will help you with your decsion. For you or anyone else who’s interested here’s the subscription address for the braille display users list that Johnathan mentioned:

braille-display-users+subscribe@groups.io

 

 

Good luck with your decsion!!   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Vaughan Dodd
Sent: April 23, 2021 5:06 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

Adding to Justin’s comments:

 

Perfect for detailed proofreading. Unlike Justin, I read extensively with my Focus operaring sas a display. If I want standalone reading, I use another device. This extensive reading goes with my job, and because I also find prolonged and intensive reliance upon synthetic speech alone very fatiguing.

 

I have to provide comment on much of what I read for work, so braille display use ensures that I follow any conventions used in documentation such as case sensitivity, spelling etc.

 

Finally: for those of us with hearing loss, keeping braille skills sharp and using braille display technology is essential.

 

Vaughan.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2021 9:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

I have a focus 40.

 

I find them very useful for reading notes, and for doing presentations.

Good for reading short passages.

 

Not great for me, and this is just personal for reading an entire book.

I am a braille reader from birth, but I find the display kind of clunky for prolonged reading, but I don't have an 80 cell which I would assume to be better than my 40 cell for reading, so maybe the 80 would be better.

 

But, it is incredibly useful.

 

 

Great for a customer service agent.

Great for employment flexibility.

 

I would hesitate on acquiring one if I was not a fluid braille user, or if you can't really see a way it could improve you.

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Bentley
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 4:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

Hello,

 

What is the difference between a reader and a Braille display?

 

Thanks,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marianne Denning
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 3:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

 There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.

 

On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

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moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Vaughan Dodd
 

Adding to Justin’s comments:

 

Perfect for detailed proofreading. Unlike Justin, I read extensively with my Focus operaring sas a display. If I want standalone reading, I use another device. This extensive reading goes with my job, and because I also find prolonged and intensive reliance upon synthetic speech alone very fatiguing.

 

I have to provide comment on much of what I read for work, so braille display use ensures that I follow any conventions used in documentation such as case sensitivity, spelling etc.

 

Finally: for those of us with hearing loss, keeping braille skills sharp and using braille display technology is essential.

 

Vaughan.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2021 9:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

I have a focus 40.

 

I find them very useful for reading notes, and for doing presentations.

Good for reading short passages.

 

Not great for me, and this is just personal for reading an entire book.

I am a braille reader from birth, but I find the display kind of clunky for prolonged reading, but I don't have an 80 cell which I would assume to be better than my 40 cell for reading, so maybe the 80 would be better.

 

But, it is incredibly useful.

 

 

Great for a customer service agent.

Great for employment flexibility.

 

I would hesitate on acquiring one if I was not a fluid braille user, or if you can't really see a way it could improve you.

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Bentley
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 4:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

Hello,

 

What is the difference between a reader and a Braille display?

 

Thanks,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marianne Denning
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 3:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

 There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.

 

On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

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If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Richard Turner
 

There are many terms that are interchangeable. 
The company, Orbit Research, chose to name their units Orbit Reader.
Any braille display can be rightfully called a reader, in that you read braille on them with their tactile display.
Things have gotten a little more confusing in recent years with the advent of what some are calling, Hybrid displays. Those are things like the Orbit Reader 20 or 40 from Orbit Research; the Brailliant BI X from Humanware, the Chameleon and Mantis from APH/HUMANWARE, and others, that are a display when connected to a computer, and have some stand-alone functions like note taking, alarm clock, calendar, calculator.

Then, there are the "Braille NoteTakers" that are completely self sufficient, in that they have their own wifi, web browser, full word processor, etc. Those Braille NoteTakers start at about $4500 while the hybrid displays start at about $700 for 20 cells, and $1400 for 40 cells and go up from there.
That is a brief summary.
I hope it helps.



Richard 
"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

www.turner42.com


On Apr 23, 2021, at 1:41 PM, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@...> wrote:



Hello,

 

What is the difference between a reader and a Braille display?

 

Thanks,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marianne Denning
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 3:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

 There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.



On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Van Lant, Robin
 

I can see the benefit of routing the cursor right to where you want it. I find I’m often arrowing back to hear a spelling of a word when proof-reading my work. 

 

If you are in Excel, does the display show you just the contents of the cell you have focus on?

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 2:29 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

WARNING: This email originated externally. Exercise caution. Think before clicking links or opening attachments.

 

I find the opposite with the Orbit Reader 40.

It is a great display to use with Jaws. It has the 40 cells and cursor routing keys which help a lot when editing.

The support from Orbit Research has been excellent.

And, you cannot beat the feel of the braille on the Orbit display. Especially if you are not a really good braille reader, the more pronounced braille will be a great help.

There is an email list for the ORBIT displays. I have some information on them on my web site, along with the email subscription fo for the email group. Look foh the heading Orbit research information at www.turner42.com

HTH,

 

 

Richard 

"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 



On Apr 23, 2021, at 1:17 PM, Marianne Denning <marianne@...> wrote:

  There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.



On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Justin Williams
 

I have a focus 40.

 

I find them very useful for reading notes, and for doing presentations.

Good for reading short passages.

 

Not great for me, and this is just personal for reading an entire book.

I am a braille reader from birth, but I find the display kind of clunky for prolonged reading, but I don't have an 80 cell which I would assume to be better than my 40 cell for reading, so maybe the 80 would be better.

 

But, it is incredibly useful.

 

 

Great for a customer service agent.

Great for employment flexibility.

 

I would hesitate on acquiring one if I was not a fluid braille user, or if you can't really see a way it could improve you.

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Bentley
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 4:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

Hello,

 

What is the difference between a reader and a Braille display?

 

Thanks,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marianne Denning
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 3:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

 There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.

 

On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

James Bentley
 

Hello,

 

What is the difference between a reader and a Braille display?

 

Thanks,

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marianne Denning
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 3:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: pros and cons of Braille display

 

 There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.



On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

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moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Richard Turner
 

I find the opposite with the Orbit Reader 40.
It is a great display to use with Jaws. It has the 40 cells and cursor routing keys which help a lot when editing.
The support from Orbit Research has been excellent.
And, you cannot beat the feel of the braille on the Orbit display. Especially if you are not a really good braille reader, the more pronounced braille will be a great help.
There is an email list for the ORBIT displays. I have some information on them on my web site, along with the email subscription fo for the email group. Look foh the heading Orbit research information at www.turner42.com
HTH,



Richard 
"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

www.turner42.com


On Apr 23, 2021, at 1:17 PM, Marianne Denning <marianne@...> wrote:

  There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.


On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

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If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Marianne Denning
 

 There are lots of ways that a braille note taker can be helpful. I mean a braille Display. You can very quickly move your Kircher where you want it to go if you have curse around and keys. Remember, the orbit reader is meant to be a reader and not a braille display for a computer. I wouldn’t spend any money on the orbit reader because I have found it to be extremely poor quality and have not found getting help with it beneficial.


On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:03 PM, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:



I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: pros and cons of Braille display

Cohn, Jonathan
 

I do find a Braille display useful for editing, though I generally don't have mine hooked up unless I am writing computer code which has to be very precise. 
JAWS does have a "structured braille mode" which is useful for filling out forms. For example if there are checkboxes or radio buttons, JAWS will display UEB code OF space UEB code with (computer Braille of these is left and right parenthesis ). If you click in the blank space between the two Braille patterns, it will check or uncheck the item. This is done with Braille displays that have a routing key over each braille character. I am not sure how the original Orbit display handles this.
Also, braille displays have 8 dots instead of 6 dots. I believe that spelling errors have both these dots on so you can quickly scan a document to find spelling errors.
There is a groups.io list  dedicated to braille displays that is run by somebody named "cliff".
 

On Apr 23, 2021, at 14:02, Van Lant, Robin via groups.io <Robin_Van_Lant@...> wrote:

I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision?  
 
Thanks for any insights.
Robin
 



KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. 

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. 

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A. 

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114 

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated pros and cons of Braille display

Van Lant, Robin
 

I have a topic I’d like some input on. If I should take it elsewhere or talk to someone offline by phone, please advise a direction to go.   I am a JAWS user and really cannot function on a computer without speech, but still have a tiny pinhole of usable vision due to RP.  I use Braille for labeling things around the house, but am not a proficient reader, especially when beyond some two letter contractions.  Braille displays have always seemed too expensive, especially given that using one would feel more like an experiment now, given my poor efficiency. Yet, as my vision decreases, I’ve wondered if a Braille display (such as the Orbit) would be useful.  I’m not planning to use it to read books, but I’d like better understanding of why some of you use it.  I’ll be paying for it out of my own pocket, so this is a decision I don’t take lightly.  Does it add value to editing and formatting in Office 365 applications?  Does it give incrased accessibility to webpages or is that really the same accessibility that listening to JAWS gives?  What else should I consider in this decision? 

 

Thanks for any insights.

Robin

 




KeyCorp Public


This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. No confidentiality or privilege is waived or lost as a result of any transmission errors. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy.

This communication is for informational purposes only, is not an offer, solicitation, recommendation or commitment for any transaction or to buy or sell any security or other financial product, and is not intended as investment advice or as a confirmation of any transaction. Any market price, indicative value, estimate, view, opinion, data or other information herein is not warranted as to completeness or accuracy, is subject to change without notice, and KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. accepts no liability for its use or to update or keep it current. Any views or opinions are those of the individual sender, not necessarily of KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.

The sender of this communication is a licensed securities representative employed by or associated with KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and may also represent KeyBank National Association (“KeyBank N.A.”). Securities products and services are offered by KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc. Banking products and services are offered by KeyBank N.A.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key send an e-mail to DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


moderated Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

Richard Turner
 

I put up my own audio description of the Orbit Reader 40 along with my attempt at a recording of the two keyboards being used to compare the sound levels.

You can find them on my web site under the Orbit Research Information page, here:

Orbit Research Information (turner42.com)

 

HTH,

 

Richard

"The highest reward for a person's toil is not what they get for it, but what they become by it."

- John Ruskin, 1819-1900

 

Web site: www.turner42.com

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Cristóbal
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 5:50 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

 

This is helpful.

I just find it odd that there seems to be very little out there on this particular model. Even YouTube doesn’t really have anything. Just that one French language video JI linked to. Tons of reviews and postings about the 20 cell displays, but no dice on the 40 cell one but for the generic postings of specs and order form .

Thanks,

 

 

Cristóbal

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:25 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

 

There has been a lot of discussion about it on the Orbit Reader list of course.

I will write something up for AppleVis at some point soon.

But, starting from physical comparisons.

1. It is no louder while refreshing.

2. The keys are louder than those on the 20.

3. The keys are laid out more like you would expect from other displays, in that the 8 dots are kind of fanned out ergonomically. So unlike the 20, dots 7 and 8 are very comfortable for your little fingers to land on.

4. The space bar is on a slightly angled lip at the front, then the braille cells, then the keyboard.

5. there are cursor routing buttons above each cell.

6. It has a USB slot so you can use a thumb drive for alternate storage.

On my web site, I have samples of the alarm sounds under the heading Orbit Research information. 

 

I really like the display. Like the 20, it is the best feeling braille of any display.

You do have to install a driver to run it with JAWS so it emulates the Vario Ultra 40. Vispero says it is up to Orbit Research to fix the driver ...

But it works great with Jaws, or NVDA.

 

 

 

Richard 

"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 

 

On Apr 22, 2021, at 2:46 PM, Cristóbal <cristobalmuli@...> wrote:



Hello list,

So I was thinking of upgrading to the Orbit Reader 40 display, but haven’t really been able to come across any reviews on the product. Write ups on the Orbit Reader 20 Plus yes, but not much for the 40. Can I just assume that they’re the same, but for amount of Braille cells?

There was one review I came across on Apple Vis but it was more focused on the device's sound than anything else. I did find one YouTube video, but it’s in French and well… I don’t speak French.

I was thinking of the Mantis 40, but honestly, I’m pretty happy with my mechanical keyboard for my desktop and I already have an 80 cell display connected to it, so this would be a more portable option for my laptop and iPhone for reading mostly. I don’t need another keyboard for that.

Anyway, if anyone’s got an Orbit Reader 40, I’d be curious to know their thoughts on how it’s holding up and general usage.

Thanks,

Cristóbal

 


moderated Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Bill White
 

Thank you, Takis.

              

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Panagiotis Antonopoulos
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 12:09 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

By tabbing several times in the meeting page.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Παρασκευή, 23 Απριλίου 2021 09:47
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi, Takis. How do you navigate to the Reactions box?

 

Thank you.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Panagiotis Antonopoulos
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 11:43 PM
To:
main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi Bill/all,

They have moved it in the reactions box, if you go into that, you will see it together with clap.

                                                                Hope this helps,

                                                                Takis

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Πέμπτη, 22 Απριλίου 2021 19:07
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi, Adrian. When in Zoom, there are two windows open. With JAWS, if I do JAWS key plus T for Title, one window just says Zoom. The other says Zoom Meeting. The window which says Zoom Meeting is usually the window in which meeting controls and shortcuts are operable. Right now, however, ALT plus Y doesn't work in either window. My question is, where is the actual meeting control that sighted persons click to raise and lower the hand. I understand that it is in the Participants panel, but I don't know exactly where it is. I have looked at this panel with JAWS, and don't see the Raise/Lower hand control here.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:47 AM
To:
main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Good morning, Bill.

 

What I find distracting while on a Zoom call is that the application opens more than one window. My guess is that you need to be in the right window for alt-y to work or to find the alternative you’re seeking here.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:04 AM
To: JFW Mailing List <jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Is there an easy way to find the Raise/Lower hand meeting control in the Participants panel using Zoom Meetings client for Windows? I know that the shortcut ALT+Y can be used. But is there an easy way using JAWS to navigate to the actual meeting control? Sometimes when using ALT+Y, I hear the error sound, as if ALT+Y is not focusing on the actual meeting control.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 


moderated Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Panagiotis Antonopoulos
 

By tabbing several times in the meeting page.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Παρασκευή, 23 Απριλίου 2021 09:47
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi, Takis. How do you navigate to the Reactions box?

 

Thank you.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Panagiotis Antonopoulos
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 11:43 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi Bill/all,

They have moved it in the reactions box, if you go into that, you will see it together with clap.

                                                                Hope this helps,

                                                                Takis

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Πέμπτη, 22 Απριλίου 2021 19:07
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi, Adrian. When in Zoom, there are two windows open. With JAWS, if I do JAWS key plus T for Title, one window just says Zoom. The other says Zoom Meeting. The window which says Zoom Meeting is usually the window in which meeting controls and shortcuts are operable. Right now, however, ALT plus Y doesn't work in either window. My question is, where is the actual meeting control that sighted persons click to raise and lower the hand. I understand that it is in the Participants panel, but I don't know exactly where it is. I have looked at this panel with JAWS, and don't see the Raise/Lower hand control here.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:47 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Good morning, Bill.

 

What I find distracting while on a Zoom call is that the application opens more than one window. My guess is that you need to be in the right window for alt-y to work or to find the alternative you’re seeking here.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:04 AM
To: JFW Mailing List <jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Is there an easy way to find the Raise/Lower hand meeting control in the Participants panel using Zoom Meetings client for Windows? I know that the shortcut ALT+Y can be used. But is there an easy way using JAWS to navigate to the actual meeting control? Sometimes when using ALT+Y, I hear the error sound, as if ALT+Y is not focusing on the actual meeting control.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 


moderated Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Bill White
 

Hi, Takis. How do you navigate to the Reactions box?

 

Thank you.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Panagiotis Antonopoulos
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 11:43 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi Bill/all,

They have moved it in the reactions box, if you go into that, you will see it together with clap.

                                                                Hope this helps,

                                                                Takis

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Πέμπτη, 22 Απριλίου 2021 19:07
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi, Adrian. When in Zoom, there are two windows open. With JAWS, if I do JAWS key plus T for Title, one window just says Zoom. The other says Zoom Meeting. The window which says Zoom Meeting is usually the window in which meeting controls and shortcuts are operable. Right now, however, ALT plus Y doesn't work in either window. My question is, where is the actual meeting control that sighted persons click to raise and lower the hand. I understand that it is in the Participants panel, but I don't know exactly where it is. I have looked at this panel with JAWS, and don't see the Raise/Lower hand control here.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:47 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Good morning, Bill.

 

What I find distracting while on a Zoom call is that the application opens more than one window. My guess is that you need to be in the right window for alt-y to work or to find the alternative you’re seeking here.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:04 AM
To: JFW Mailing List <jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Is there an easy way to find the Raise/Lower hand meeting control in the Participants panel using Zoom Meetings client for Windows? I know that the shortcut ALT+Y can be used. But is there an easy way using JAWS to navigate to the actual meeting control? Sometimes when using ALT+Y, I hear the error sound, as if ALT+Y is not focusing on the actual meeting control.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 


moderated Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Panagiotis Antonopoulos
 

Hi Bill/all,

They have moved it in the reactions box, if you go into that, you will see it together with clap.

                                                                Hope this helps,

                                                                Takis

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Πέμπτη, 22 Απριλίου 2021 19:07
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Hi, Adrian. When in Zoom, there are two windows open. With JAWS, if I do JAWS key plus T for Title, one window just says Zoom. The other says Zoom Meeting. The window which says Zoom Meeting is usually the window in which meeting controls and shortcuts are operable. Right now, however, ALT plus Y doesn't work in either window. My question is, where is the actual meeting control that sighted persons click to raise and lower the hand. I understand that it is in the Participants panel, but I don't know exactly where it is. I have looked at this panel with JAWS, and don't see the Raise/Lower hand control here.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:47 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Good morning, Bill.

 

What I find distracting while on a Zoom call is that the application opens more than one window. My guess is that you need to be in the right window for alt-y to work or to find the alternative you’re seeking here.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:04 AM
To: JFW Mailing List <jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

 

Is there an easy way to find the Raise/Lower hand meeting control in the Participants panel using Zoom Meetings client for Windows? I know that the shortcut ALT+Y can be used. But is there an easy way using JAWS to navigate to the actual meeting control? Sometimes when using ALT+Y, I hear the error sound, as if ALT+Y is not focusing on the actual meeting control.

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 


moderated Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Panagiotis Antonopoulos
 

Sorry Mario, I thought I was responding to Adrian. My sincere apologies.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Πέμπτη, 22 Απριλίου 2021 18:30
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Takis, my sister has complained about the ding sound when pressing alt+a to mute/unmute. for curiosity sake, would you mind enlightening us to what those other annoyances would be?

-------- Original Message --------
From: Panagiotis Antonopoulos [mailto:pantonop2856@gmail.com]
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows
Date: Thursday, April 22, 2021, 8:03 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Hi Adrian/Bill/all,

Since its last update, zoom seems to be in great mess, with the more crucial the inability to use alt-y to have hands raised. We experienced that in a course on teams, which is conducted via zoom. I have also found some other annoying minor things, but hope all this will vanish soon.

Take care,

Takis



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: ??µpt?, 22 ?p?????? 2021 13:47
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows



Good morning, Bill.



What I find distracting while on a Zoom call is that the application opens more than one window. My guess is that you need to be in the right window for alt-y to work or to find the alternative you’re seeking here.



From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> > On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:04 AM
To: JFW Mailing List <jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io> >
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows



Is there an easy way to find the Raise/Lower hand meeting control in the Participants panel using Zoom Meetings client for Windows? I know that the shortcut ALT+Y can be used. But is there an easy way using JAWS to navigate to the actual meeting control? Sometimes when using ALT+Y, I hear the error sound, as if ALT+Y is not focusing on the actual meeting control.



Thank you.



Bill White



billwhite92701@att.net <mailto:billwhite92701@att.net>


moderated Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Panagiotis Antonopoulos
 

Hi Adrian/all,
Primarily I got inconsistent screens while logging and again a box to tick to allow video and audio or a screen to download zoom if I had not done that, which is entirely irrelevant in my case. The most annoying thing for me recently though is that when I want to invite someone and switch to my default mailer, outlook, it does not give the autocomplete address, with the result that I need to open, close, and finally, restart the computer. This is most annoying to me, but zoom is I think, not to blame. Take care, Takis

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Πέμπτη, 22 Απριλίου 2021 18:30
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows

Takis, my sister has complained about the ding sound when pressing alt+a to mute/unmute. for curiosity sake, would you mind enlightening us to what those other annoyances would be?

-------- Original Message --------
From: Panagiotis Antonopoulos [mailto:pantonop2856@gmail.com]
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows
Date: Thursday, April 22, 2021, 8:03 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Hi Adrian/Bill/all,

Since its last update, zoom seems to be in great mess, with the more crucial the inability to use alt-y to have hands raised. We experienced that in a course on teams, which is conducted via zoom. I have also found some other annoying minor things, but hope all this will vanish soon.

Take care,

Takis



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: ??µpt?, 22 ?p?????? 2021 13:47
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows



Good morning, Bill.



What I find distracting while on a Zoom call is that the application opens more than one window. My guess is that you need to be in the right window for alt-y to work or to find the alternative you’re seeking here.



From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> > On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:04 AM
To: JFW Mailing List <jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io> >
Subject: Raise/Lower hand meeting control in Zoom for Windows



Is there an easy way to find the Raise/Lower hand meeting control in the Participants panel using Zoom Meetings client for Windows? I know that the shortcut ALT+Y can be used. But is there an easy way using JAWS to navigate to the actual meeting control? Sometimes when using ALT+Y, I hear the error sound, as if ALT+Y is not focusing on the actual meeting control.



Thank you.



Bill White



billwhite92701@att.net <mailto:billwhite92701@att.net>


moderated Re: Jaws 2020 wont start automaticly #jaws

johnny.hauan@...
 

Hi

Yes that works but the setting is for running JAWS at the logon screen. Putting in shell:startup will make it run after logon. 


moderated Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

Sharon
 

Hope they work better than the 20.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 9:12 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

 

Well, it has only been on the market a little over a month, and they do not have a huge PR budget like some companies.

 

 

Richard 

"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 



On Apr 22, 2021, at 5:49 PM, Cristóbal <cristobalmuli@...> wrote:



This is helpful.

I just find it odd that there seems to be very little out there on this particular model. Even YouTube doesn’t really have anything. Just that one French language video JI linked to. Tons of reviews and postings about the 20 cell displays, but no dice on the 40 cell one but for the generic postings of specs and order form .

Thanks,

 

 

Cristóbal

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 3:25 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Orbit Reader 40 review? Thoughts?

 

There has been a lot of discussion about it on the Orbit Reader list of course.

I will write something up for AppleVis at some point soon.

But, starting from physical comparisons.

1. It is no louder while refreshing.

2. The keys are louder than those on the 20.

3. The keys are laid out more like you would expect from other displays, in that the 8 dots are kind of fanned out ergonomically. So unlike the 20, dots 7 and 8 are very comfortable for your little fingers to land on.

4. The space bar is on a slightly angled lip at the front, then the braille cells, then the keyboard.

5. there are cursor routing buttons above each cell.

6. It has a USB slot so you can use a thumb drive for alternate storage.

On my web site, I have samples of the alarm sounds under the heading Orbit Research information. 

 

I really like the display. Like the 20, it is the best feeling braille of any display.

You do have to install a driver to run it with JAWS so it emulates the Vario Ultra 40. Vispero says it is up to Orbit Research to fix the driver ...

But it works great with Jaws, or NVDA.

 

 

 

Richard 

"Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 




On Apr 22, 2021, at 2:46 PM, Cristóbal <cristobalmuli@...> wrote:



Hello list,

So I was thinking of upgrading to the Orbit Reader 40 display, but haven’t really been able to come across any reviews on the product. Write ups on the Orbit Reader 20 Plus yes, but not much for the 40. Can I just assume that they’re the same, but for amount of Braille cells?

There was one review I came across on Apple Vis but it was more focused on the device's sound than anything else. I did find one YouTube video, but it’s in French and well… I don’t speak French.

I was thinking of the Mantis 40, but honestly, I’m pretty happy with my mechanical keyboard for my desktop and I already have an 80 cell display connected to it, so this would be a more portable option for my laptop and iPhone for reading mostly. I don’t need another keyboard for that.

Anyway, if anyone’s got an Orbit Reader 40, I’d be curious to know their thoughts on how it’s holding up and general usage.

Thanks,

Cristóbal

 

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