Date   

moderated Re: find next

Ann Byrne
 

If you use insert-ctrl-f fo r find, then I think you have to use insert-f3 for find next.

good luck.

At 12:53 PM 11/25/2020, you wrote:
OK I use the insert control f to find something on a web page and it works as it should. What is the find next command? I thought it was f3 or control f3 but neither seems to work.
Thanks





moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 03:58 PM, mike mcglashon wrote:
Wouldn’t it be worth word to somehow take a pdf image and create a fillable form on the fly, resave the form as pdf and then we’d have pdf fillable forms?
-
It's only "worth it" if enough people or organizations want it.

But there's really not any point, to my way of thinking, in making Word handle PDFs in this manner.  The PDF format came into existence as a direct offshoot of professional publishing needs.  Word reading these in was an afterthought, and Word's ability to save PDFs is limited in many ways by design.  If you want fillable PDFs, then either design that in when creating them to begin with or retrofit it when you have to go back and edit an existing form that isn't.  If the form is an image scanned PDF then OCR it, save that text layer, then do the correct updates to the form in a PDF editor to make it as it needs to be.  An image scanned PDF read into word behaves no differently than it did in a PDF reader - it's still an image inserted into a Word document.  Word makes no attempt to figure out what that image might contain.

AI, of course, will likely come into the picture as time marches on for a lot of these functions.  But even when it does, I really believe that review by humans afterwards will always be required, as we still catch stuff that somehow gets overlooked by automation (or other humans who set up what the automation carried through).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Zoom keyboard commands

Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Adrian. I must be signed in to see the setting button.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Zoom keyboard commands

 

Bill and list,

 

I have a basic question. How do I get to settings in Zoom? Must I be signed in?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 2:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Zoom keyboard commands

 

Hi, Ray. You can find Keyboard Shortcuts under settings. It will be second to last in the settings menu, right above Accessibility.

 

For your information, here is an extensive list of Zoom keyboard shortcuts.

 

 

Navigate Among Zoom Popup Windows

F6

 

Change Focus to Zoom Meeting Controls (On Top when Sharing Screen)

Ctrl+Alt+Shift

 

View the Previous Page of Video Participants in Gallery View

Page Up

 

View the Next Page of Video Participants in Gallery View

Page Down

 

Always Show Meeting Controls

Alt

 

Switch to Speaker View

Alt+F1

 

Switch to Gallery View

Alt+F2

 

Close Current Window

Alt+F4

 

Start/Stop Video

Alt+V

 

Mute/Unmute My Audio

Alt+A

 

Unmute Audio for Everyone Except Host (Host Only)

Alt+M

 

Start/Stop Screen Sharing

Alt+S

 

Show/Hide Windows and Applications Available to Share

Alt+Shift+S

 

Pause/Resume Screen Sharing

Alt+T

 

Start/Stop Local Recording

Alt+R

 

Start/Stop Cloud Recording

Alt+C

 

Pause/Resume Recording

Alt+P

 

Switch Camera

Alt+N

 

Enter/Exit Full Screen Mode

Alt+F

 

Show/Hide In-meeting Chat Panel

Alt+H

 

Show/Hide Participants Panel

Alt+U

 

Open the invite window

Alt+I

 

Raise/Lower Hand

Alt+Y

 

End Meeting

Alt+Q

 

Begin Remote Control

Alt+Shift+R

 

Revoke/Give up Remote Control

Alt+Shift+G

 

Read active speaker name

Ctrl+2,In Jaws, Ctrl+SHIFT+T

 

Show/Hide Floating Meeting Controls

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+H

 

Increase chat display size

Ctrl++

 

Decrease chat display size

Ctrl+-

 

Screenshot

Alt+Shift+T

 

Switch to Portrait/Landscape View

Alt+L

 

Hide current chat session

Ctrl+W

 

Go to Previous Chat

Ctrl+Up

 

Go to Next Chat

Ctrl+Down

 

Jump to Chat with Someone

Ctrl+T

 

Search

Ctrl+F

 

Accept Call

Ctrl+Shift+A

 

End Call

Ctrl+Shift+E

 

Decline Call

Ctrl+Shift+D

 

Mute/Unmute Call

Ctrl+Shift+M

 

Hold/Unhold Call

Ctrl+Shift+H

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ray Lough
Sent: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 7:23 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Zoom keyboard commands

 

Where can I find a list of Zoom keyboard commands?

 

 

Ray Lough

Attorney-at-Law

306 E 13th Street, Suite 2

Vinton, IA 52349

319-472-3812

 


moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 03:58 PM, mike mcglashon wrote:
I can see where sighted persons love pdf because they can take a picture of the paper form scan it in as image and be done with it.
-
Which is fine, if all you plan to ever do it print on paper again.   Also, very few scanning utilities these days don't create PDF files with a text layer associated with them if the thing being scanned contains text.  Image scanned PDFs really are largely a thing of the past, but so many were created during that period of many years that untold millions almost certainly exist.  One of the first things I taught my clients who were students getting image scanned PDFs as part of their required reading was how to OCR scan them with PDF-XChange Viewer and save the file, which keeps the text layer as part of the PDF.  I also suggested that they hand copies of these off to their professors and ask that the OCRed version be made the repository copy as opposed to the image scanned original.

I have never seen anyone create a form using automation, only a human sitting behind a desk, as there's so much trial and error getting things to look the way you want them to.  It should certainly be possible if one is using automation to create a fillable PDF that at least the various fillable fields would be identified in some way, but even that would rely on the human designer using whatever syntax is required to have that happen.

The problem with legally mandating any of this is that there is really no way to enforce it, at least not effectively, along with the fact that, as I said earlier, there are just too many people who don't have a clue as to how to do what's needed for something to be accessible.

You also make a good point with, "I think it would be unreasonable, let alone impossible, to ask the “majority” sighted persons, to take “extra time” to create such forms, when the “majority” of persons using the forms are in fact sighted?"   There are untold millions of forms that get created for small organizations, groups, etc., where there is absolutely no reason for them to be accessible when push comes to shove.  Material is created with target demographics in mind.  I would be thrilled if the realization finally hit that when that demographic is, "the general public," that accessibility must be kept in mind and implemented.  If there are to be legal mandates, they would need to be carefully targeted if there is any hope of having the ability to enforce.  I've created plenty of inaccessible stuff in my life, about which I have zero regrets, because I knew the target audience did not include, and would never include, a screen reader user.  Most of that sort of stuff was questionnaires for business meetings, flyers for street festivals, and the like.  But, back to your original point, it's really not exclusively about whether the majority of people using something are sighted, it's about whether it's reasonable to believe that same would also be expected to be used by those who are visually impaired or blind.  Things like IRS tax forms (or at least the ones I've dealt with) that are PDF fillable forms are accessible and should be because there is every reason to expect that many who are blind will have to deal with them.  And, for large organizations, not limited to the government, having accessibility designed in saves a fortune in "help desk hours" over the life of the form.  There are many who are now cluing in to that fact.  Better late than never.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

mike mcglashon
 

Mr. brian:

 

Quoted:

I've been using fillable forms for a very long time now.  When I hand someone the electronic equivalent of a paper form, the only things I want them to be able to touch are the parts that you'd actually fill out were you using pen on a paper form.  No accidental removal of labels, checkboxes, etc., and fillable forms have "filled that bill" perfectly.

End quote:

 

I like your response to fillable forms, however, you stated earlier,

That,

You haven’t much experience with pdf fillable forms because you do not have a pdf editor which allows you to make such forms.

I believe you stated that your experience is within the word arena of making fillable word forms.

 

Maybe the answer lies somewhere in between.

I can see where sighted persons love pdf because they can take a picture of the paper form scan it in as image and be done with it.

Wouldn’t it be worth word to somehow take a pdf image and create a fillable form on the fly, resave the form as pdf and then we’d have pdf fillable forms?

 

I think it would be unreasonable, let alone impossible, to ask the “majority” sighted persons, to take “extra time” to create such forms, when the “majority” of persons using the forms are in fact sighted?

 

I do wish however, that sighted persons creating such forms by automation could be forced to create the accessible forms.  For instance, if someone creates a fillable form, there could be a “wcag” you know the supposed “guidelines” “not law” to automatically do an error check for specifically accessible characteristics, and when it fails, the thing wouldn’t even let them save it to their computer?

(kind of like a program compiler)?

They most  certainly would learn wouldn’t they?

 

I believe the guidelines, although not congressional law, could be implemented in some sort of automated way; hence, the sightee would either fix it till the compiler gets it right, or,

Risk losing their work altogether.  They’d learn quickly, wouldn’t they?

 

Please advise as you like.

 

Mike M.

 

Mike mcglashon

Email: Michael.mcglashon@...

Ph: 618 783 9331

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 3:30 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 01:58 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:

Honestly, my university has been struggling with this – they seem to be stumped. Go figure.

-
It really does astound me how little fillable forms (whether done with accessibility in mind, or not) under MS-Word have never really caught on.  When you couple that with people who think that an MS-Word document that prints perfectly as a standard blank paper form is accessible, it's even worse.

I've been using fillable forms for a very long time now.  When I hand someone the electronic equivalent of a paper form, the only things I want them to be able to touch are the parts that you'd actually fill out were you using pen on a paper form.  No accidental removal of labels, checkboxes, etc., and fillable forms have "filled that bill" perfectly.

I believe that anyone with more than a cursory familiarity with MS-Word will be able to follow that tutorial, particularly since screen shots of each and every critical, and some not so critical, steps are shown so that a sense of, "Oh, I'm seeing that, I must be doing it right," will develop quickly.

The trickiest part, really, is getting the sighted to understand that they absolutely, positively must take the time to add the Help Text for each and every form control, be it a text box, checkbox, or dropdown, that a user can touch if they want the form to be accessible.  That text is what the screen reader reads upon encountering a form control, and it never has any access to the protected elements in a fillable form, just like the end user doesn't have access to those when filling it out.

The one thing that's even less known is that the capability exists, after the form is completed, to convert its contents to plain old text.  There are occasions where you want to control entry of form information, but where being able to see the form in its entirety afterward is desirable.  Sometimes it doesn't matter, and others it does.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Looking For Jim Weiss

Robbie Curtis
 

Good Afternoon Yall,


I was wondering if anyone knows how to get in touch with Jim Weiss? I have some questions that I need answered concerning VmWare and Windows.


If anyone knows how I can get in touch with him please reply. Thanks.


moderated Re: find next

 

Excuse me, that was a typo for triggering JAWS Find, which is CTRL+INS+F,  NOT F3

And this presumes the desktop keyboard layout is in use.  Substitute CAPS LOCK for INS if using the laptop layout.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: find next

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 01:55 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
I don't use insert on a web page.
Try just control + F and F3 to repeat it.
I only include the insert key in eMail messages.
-
That really depends on what it is you're trying to find.  The straight browser find works perfectly if you're interested in finding something in the page text, but controls like buttons will be ignored.

There are times when forcing a screen reader find to "take in everything" is worth doing, but it depends on what it is you're trying to search.  And depending on what's on the web page you may or may not be able to force a screen reader find function.

JAWS find is triggered by CTRL+INS+F3 and you use INS+F3 to do a JAWS Find Next. and INS+SHIFT+F3 to do a JAWS Find Previous. 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 01:58 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:
Honestly, my university has been struggling with this – they seem to be stumped. Go figure.
-
It really does astound me how little fillable forms (whether done with accessibility in mind, or not) under MS-Word have never really caught on.  When you couple that with people who think that an MS-Word document that prints perfectly as a standard blank paper form is accessible, it's even worse.

I've been using fillable forms for a very long time now.  When I hand someone the electronic equivalent of a paper form, the only things I want them to be able to touch are the parts that you'd actually fill out were you using pen on a paper form.  No accidental removal of labels, checkboxes, etc., and fillable forms have "filled that bill" perfectly.

I believe that anyone with more than a cursory familiarity with MS-Word will be able to follow that tutorial, particularly since screen shots of each and every critical, and some not so critical, steps are shown so that a sense of, "Oh, I'm seeing that, I must be doing it right," will develop quickly.

The trickiest part, really, is getting the sighted to understand that they absolutely, positively must take the time to add the Help Text for each and every form control, be it a text box, checkbox, or dropdown, that a user can touch if they want the form to be accessible.  That text is what the screen reader reads upon encountering a form control, and it never has any access to the protected elements in a fillable form, just like the end user doesn't have access to those when filling it out.

The one thing that's even less known is that the capability exists, after the form is completed, to convert its contents to plain old text.  There are occasions where you want to control entry of form information, but where being able to see the form in its entirety afterward is desirable.  Sometimes it doesn't matter, and others it does.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Zoom keyboard commands

Adrian Spratt
 

Bill and list,

 

I have a basic question. How do I get to settings in Zoom? Must I be signed in?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 2:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Zoom keyboard commands

 

Hi, Ray. You can find Keyboard Shortcuts under settings. It will be second to last in the settings menu, right above Accessibility.

 

For your information, here is an extensive list of Zoom keyboard shortcuts.

 

 

Navigate Among Zoom Popup Windows

F6

 

Change Focus to Zoom Meeting Controls (On Top when Sharing Screen)

Ctrl+Alt+Shift

 

View the Previous Page of Video Participants in Gallery View

Page Up

 

View the Next Page of Video Participants in Gallery View

Page Down

 

Always Show Meeting Controls

Alt

 

Switch to Speaker View

Alt+F1

 

Switch to Gallery View

Alt+F2

 

Close Current Window

Alt+F4

 

Start/Stop Video

Alt+V

 

Mute/Unmute My Audio

Alt+A

 

Unmute Audio for Everyone Except Host (Host Only)

Alt+M

 

Start/Stop Screen Sharing

Alt+S

 

Show/Hide Windows and Applications Available to Share

Alt+Shift+S

 

Pause/Resume Screen Sharing

Alt+T

 

Start/Stop Local Recording

Alt+R

 

Start/Stop Cloud Recording

Alt+C

 

Pause/Resume Recording

Alt+P

 

Switch Camera

Alt+N

 

Enter/Exit Full Screen Mode

Alt+F

 

Show/Hide In-meeting Chat Panel

Alt+H

 

Show/Hide Participants Panel

Alt+U

 

Open the invite window

Alt+I

 

Raise/Lower Hand

Alt+Y

 

End Meeting

Alt+Q

 

Begin Remote Control

Alt+Shift+R

 

Revoke/Give up Remote Control

Alt+Shift+G

 

Read active speaker name

Ctrl+2,In Jaws, Ctrl+SHIFT+T

 

Show/Hide Floating Meeting Controls

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+H

 

Increase chat display size

Ctrl++

 

Decrease chat display size

Ctrl+-

 

Screenshot

Alt+Shift+T

 

Switch to Portrait/Landscape View

Alt+L

 

Hide current chat session

Ctrl+W

 

Go to Previous Chat

Ctrl+Up

 

Go to Next Chat

Ctrl+Down

 

Jump to Chat with Someone

Ctrl+T

 

Search

Ctrl+F

 

Accept Call

Ctrl+Shift+A

 

End Call

Ctrl+Shift+E

 

Decline Call

Ctrl+Shift+D

 

Mute/Unmute Call

Ctrl+Shift+M

 

Hold/Unhold Call

Ctrl+Shift+H

 

 

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ray Lough
Sent: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 7:23 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Zoom keyboard commands

 

Where can I find a list of Zoom keyboard commands?

 

 

Ray Lough

Attorney-at-Law

306 E 13th Street, Suite 2

Vinton, IA 52349

319-472-3812

 


moderated Re: find next

David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...>
 

Glen is right. Pressing f3 on a Web page will move to the next instance of what you last entered in the JAWS find dialog.
As a reminder pressing insert-space followed by the letter J will let you enter a search term for a keystroke you may have forgotten. In this case, entering the word "find" would give you a list of JAWS find commands.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 11/25/2020 1:55 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
I don't use insert on a web page.
Try just control + F and F3 to repeat it.
I only include the insert key in eMail messages.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don H" <lmddh50@adams.net>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:53 PM
Subject: find next


OK I use the insert control f to find something on a web page and it
works as it should. What is the find next command? I thought it was f3
or control f3 but neither seems to work.
Thanks










moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

Cynthia Bruce
 

Thanks, Brian! Honestly, my university has been struggling with this – they seem to be stumped. Go figure.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November 25, 2020 1:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: find next

Glenn / Lenny
 

I don't use insert on a web page.
Try just control + F and F3 to repeat it.
I only include the insert key in eMail messages.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don H" <lmddh50@adams.net>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:53 PM
Subject: find next


OK I use the insert control f to find something on a web page and it
works as it should. What is the find next command? I thought it was f3
or control f3 but neither seems to work.
Thanks


moderated find next

Don H
 

OK I use the insert control f to find something on a web page and it works as it should. What is the find next command? I thought it was f3 or control f3 but neither seems to work.
Thanks


moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 12:57 PM, Justin Williams wrote:
Do you have one for accessible pdfs, and fillable pdsf?
-.
Unfortunately not, and that's mostly because I don't have any real, high-powered PDF Editor at my disposal.

The concepts have got to be parallel, but the actual commands involved would vary depending on the specific PDF editing software used to create the fillable PDF.

And the last time I played with it, even though MS-Word can save as PDF, it cannot save its own fillable forms as a PDF equivalent.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

Justin Williams
 

Going to keep this one and practice.

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

Justin Williams
 

Do you have one for accessible pdfs, and fillable pdsf?

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


moderated jaws smart navigation

Don H
 

Earlier I reported that when arrowing up and down on a web page Jaws would make a sound when falling on a link. Turns out that this is caused by having smart navigation enabled. It beeps when there is a line that both has some text and a link on the same line. Turning off smart navigation solves this issue.


moderated Re: Slack and application mode

Ekstrand, Pamela A. -ND
 

I can't seem to get control shift D to remove those. I
Have not been able to find a place to permanently remove the toolbar items.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mauck via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 11:27 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Slack and application mode

Hi, have you looked at all the different keystrokes? Even they don't always work, CTRL+/ will bring all those up. Sometimes depending upon where the cursor focus is, CTRL+Shift+d will hide some of those annoying toolbars.
I think with more and more companies using Slack, Vispero might have an opportunity to help in this. BTW, NVDA isn't any better.


Regards:

Don Mauck | Senior Accessibility Evangelist | Accessibility Program Office | (APO)

303.334.4184
Don.mauck@oracle.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Ekstrand, Pamela A. -ND <pamela.a.ekstrand.-nd@disney.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 9:22 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Slack and application mode

My company uses Slack heavily for communication. I am probably not using it in the most efficient way.

I find that I have to arrow through a lot of extraneous verbiage before finding posts from others or the edit box where I can enter text. If I try to go to the edit box directly by using the "E" key, it often puts an 'E' in the edit box as if I was already in forms mode. Does anyone know how to get around this?

Also, does anyone know how to get rid of what seems to be a toolbar near the bottom of the screen?

Thanks,
Pam


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rollin Hippler via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 5:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Slack and application mode

I have found Slack extremely difficult to use from the first attempt I ever made to use it.


I've achieved the best result (for me) to be use insert+z to switch from virtual cursor to PC cursor, then use F6 to navigate between the various panes.  This still results in sometimes unexpected results, depending on which panes are visible.


Rollin

On 11/24/2020 5:58 PM, Don Mauck wrote:

Well, I’m getting a bit confused myself. It seems that I do get
different results with CTRL1 or 2. As I look at my version of Slack,
Slack Version 4.11.2, I feel like Slack works differently.

I’m finding that the long list of keystrokes, (CTRL+/, have no
consistency. I’m determined to learn Slack since it appears that now,
everyone insists in using this very ugly product.

Are there Slack users? I’ve bee looking for some kind of Slack
accessibility list but what used to be available is no longer valid.

Regards:

Don Mauck | Senior Accessibility Evangelist | Accessibility Program
Office |  (APO)

303.334.4184 <303.334.4184>

Don.mauck@oracle.com <mailto:Don.mauck@oracle.com>

*From:* Mark <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>
*Sent:* Tuesday, November 24, 2020 3:28 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Slack and application mode

It's a little promising but still not like before. What does CTRL+ 1
do in JAWS?  I tried looking it up in keyboard help but it didn't say
anything.
In Slack, CTRL + 1 is a shortcut for changing to a workspace.

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