Date   

reading numbers

brian <bvarner05@...>
 

Hi All,

I want to change how JAWS reads numbers. I'm using version 11. I'd like to hear the time and date read as "six thirty" instead of 6 colon three zero, and the date as March 7, two thousand twelve, instead of March 7, two zero one two (for example). I'd like to change this globally.

Proofing what I just wrote above, I'm hearing "version one one" instead of version eleven, for example, again.

Thanks,

Brian


Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Dondi
 

Hi Richard,

What works very well for me for tactile landmarks on the home row and
anywhere else I want is round Velcro pieces.

Dondi
We are the music makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams.

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of Richard Holloway
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 9:50 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Thanks Chris,

My daughter has used several of the different programs. The only one she has
really taken to is Talking Typing Teacher. Unfortunately has proven to be a
little unstable on her computer, and we haven't had the best luck with tech
support for the program.

Yes, she's using an cranmer abacus. I agree entirely-- important to know.
Math is a challenge for her. She's a very good student but she has to work
so hard to be successful with her math as opposed to other subjects. The
abacus overall seems most useful. Math window is also very helpful to learn
certain concepts, but terribly slow for use on many problems in a row. Some
processes also need to be demonstrated on a brailler as well, which seems
such an incredible hassle to work with for math problems.

I'll give another look towards Typeability. The CakeTalking software looks
interesting as well. Appears to be JAWS friendly too. Is that the audio
piece you are using? I'd love to find an accessible multitrack program she
can use, though I don't know what sort of interface that program will work
with either. I'll have to read up on it. I generally have to do all the
button-pushing for her when she wants to do much in the multi-track realm.
She's quite recording savvy. (I'm a recording engineer, so I'll take a bit
of credit for that!) My first choice is usually Pro Tools on a Mac (if not
conventional consoles and old analog recording gear), but I'm not aware of
any reasonable adaptation of that package at all.

Thanks again,

Richard




On Mar 6, 2012, at 6:35 PM, Chris Smart wrote:

Hi.

I'm glad you are kean to see your child learn to type on a qwerty
keyboard. :)

I didn't learn to tyep on a modified keyboard. in fact, this was back in
the 1980's when electric typewriters were common and manuals were still
around. Lucky for me, my mom was a secretary at one time in her life, so she
knew how to type properly.

Most computer keyboards have tactile markers on the F and J keys on the
home ro already, where your index fingers should rest. I guess if you need
more tactile marking you could simply add braille labels to a standard
keyboard.

The process is about the same today as it was then. learn the home row and
gradually add more letters, punctuation etc.

Use the propper fingers on the keys. It helps if whoever is teaching
actually types properly as well! that is, no hunting and pecking,
two-fingered looking at the keys typing, but propper touch typing without
looking at the keys!

Typing to produce things in print for school, letters to my relatives,
playing computer games, and other such activities meant that I was typing a
lot, learned fast, and was typing at a good 70 words a minute by the time I
entered high school. That's considerably faster than I've seen anybody go
on a perkins style keyboard. The more you use your new skill to actually
accomplish things, the faster it should come.

Learning that way also gave me a basic grasp of how sighted people like to
see things laid out on the page. what margins were, centering... important
spacial concepts.

I'm not saying go find an old typewriter and learn how I did. There
must be some sort of accessible typing tutor software available. :)

Ah, Google just gave me this:
http://www.yesaccessible.com/

That looks like exactly what you need, Typeability 4.0.

I use their other product in my music work, so I can vouch for the
excellent quality of David Pinto's scripts and documentation!

Chris

P.S. I hope your child is also using an abacus to learn basic math, to
really get the basic principles ingrained early.
--------------------------------------------------
CTS MASTERING: PROFESSIONAL MIXING AND MASTERING!
http://www.ctsmastering.com

Dropbox: Have your stuff when you need it. 2GB is free
http://db.tt/bQ2GuIt


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Richard Holloway
 

Thanks Chris,

My daughter has used several of the different programs. The only one she has really taken to is Talking Typing Teacher. Unfortunately has proven to be a little unstable on her computer, and we haven't had the best luck with tech support for the program.

Yes, she's using an cranmer abacus. I agree entirely-- important to know. Math is a challenge for her. She's a very good student but she has to work so hard to be successful with her math as opposed to other subjects. The abacus overall seems most useful. Math window is also very helpful to learn certain concepts, but terribly slow for use on many problems in a row. Some processes also need to be demonstrated on a brailler as well, which seems such an incredible hassle to work with for math problems.

I'll give another look towards Typeability. The CakeTalking software looks interesting as well. Appears to be JAWS friendly too. Is that the audio piece you are using? I'd love to find an accessible multitrack program she can use, though I don't know what sort of interface that program will work with either. I'll have to read up on it. I generally have to do all the button-pushing for her when she wants to do much in the multi-track realm. She's quite recording savvy. (I'm a recording engineer, so I'll take a bit of credit for that!) My first choice is usually Pro Tools on a Mac (if not conventional consoles and old analog recording gear), but I'm not aware of any reasonable adaptation of that package at all.

Thanks again,

Richard

On Mar 6, 2012, at 6:35 PM, Chris Smart wrote:

Hi.

I'm glad you are kean to see your child learn to type on a qwerty keyboard. :)

I didn't learn to tyep on a modified keyboard. in fact, this was back in the 1980's when electric typewriters were common and manuals were still around. Lucky for me, my mom was a secretary at one time in her life, so she knew how to type properly.

Most computer keyboards have tactile markers on the F and J keys on the home ro already, where your index fingers should rest. I guess if you need more tactile marking you could simply add braille labels to a standard keyboard.

The process is about the same today as it was then. learn the home row and gradually add more letters, punctuation etc.

Use the propper fingers on the keys. It helps if whoever is teaching actually types properly as well! that is, no hunting and pecking, two-fingered looking at the keys typing, but propper touch typing without looking at the keys!

Typing to produce things in print for school, letters to my relatives, playing computer games, and other such activities meant that I was typing a lot, learned fast, and was typing at a good 70 words a minute by the time I entered high school. That's considerably faster than I've seen anybody go on a perkins style keyboard. The more you use your new skill to actually accomplish things, the faster it should come.

Learning that way also gave me a basic grasp of how sighted people like to see things laid out on the page. what margins were, centering... important spacial concepts.

I'm not saying go find an old typewriter and learn how I did. There must be some sort of accessible typing tutor software available. :)

Ah, Google just gave me this:
http://www.yesaccessible.com/

That looks like exactly what you need, Typeability 4.0.

I use their other product in my music work, so I can vouch for the excellent quality of David Pinto's scripts and documentation!

Chris

P.S. I hope your child is also using an abacus to learn basic math, to really get the basic principles ingrained early.
--------------------------------------------------
CTS MASTERING: PROFESSIONAL MIXING AND MASTERING!
http://www.ctsmastering.com

Dropbox: Have your stuff when you need it. 2GB is free
http://db.tt/bQ2GuIt


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: Lost Menues

epierce@...
 

Outlook 2010 has the "Ribbon", not the traditional "Alt" menu.

You can get something similar the the traditional "Alt" menu in Outlook 2010 by pressing "Alt-H" (or other "Alt+[some letter] combinations).

Microsoft has some good material about shortcut keys on one of their web sites:

http://www.howto-outlook.com/howto/keyboardshortcuts.htm


Re: Lost Menues

epierce@...
 

I hate to say it, but FS might be right.

This is why it is important to purchase a computer with excellent support options, including hardware diagnostics and warranty parts replacement. For instance, the Dell "business class" machines, such as Latitude or Optiplex, which have "enhanced pre-boot system assessment" built into the system, which will run even when no hard drive is present (!).

Do not discount the possibility of hardware problems, which could have been caused by lightning, or that may have appeared by coincidence. New computers do break. Parts can have manufacturing glitches that do not show up at first. This is why tech support shops run hardware diagnostics. Typically hard drives degrade incrementally due to "self-healing" ("S.M.A.R.T.") technology engineered into the hard drive electronics. Things can be weird for a while, then the "self healing" mechanism no longer works, and the computer becomes more seriously broken in operation. RAM (memory chips) can degrade and fail. Power supplies can degrade and fail. Video cards are notorious for failing and having driver problems. And so forth.

If there are hardware/driver problems, no end of other software "fixes" will ever solve a problem at the source.

The questions is: did the user get information from the manufacturer, or retailer, on how to run hardware diagnostics (or how to have the vendor or retailer do so)?

If so, what was the result of the diagnostics?

If the diagnostics indicate hardware failure, was the computer under warranty, and if so, were the defective parts or the entire machine, sent back or replaced on warranty?

Only after ensuring that there are no hardware or driver problems should work
proceed on fixing or reinstalling the operating system or application software.

The only short cut I would consider taking is to swap a "known good" (blank) hard drive in, and do a "bare metal" reinstall of the operating system and any other critical software as a test.

For future reference, please note that when a new computer is first put into use, its hard drive can be "cloned" to a second hard drive, which can then be removed from the computer and stored in case an emergency replacement is needed.

HTH!

---- Original message ----
Date: Mon, 5 Mar 2012 18:48:34 -0500
From: jfw-bounces@... (on behalf of "David" <davidwhitehead1957@...>)
Subject: Lost Menues
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>


Hello there;
Knowing the computer is only 10 months old, I highly doubt junking it would
be the answer.
I think saying that is a real cop out, not wanting to deal with the issues.

Maybe a good format might be in order.
...


Re: I.E. remembering passwords

epierce@...
 

On the IE Menu click Tools, then Options.

Click the "Content" tab.

Click the AutoComplete "Settings" button.

In the "Autocomplete Settings" popup box, click to mark the check box next to "User names and passwords on forms".

Optionally, click to mark the check box select "Ask me before saving passwords".

Managing usernames and passwords for individual web sites is no obvious.

The following instructions are from the below link.

http://pubs.logicalexpressions.com/Pub0009/LPMArticle.asp?ID=348

So what to do if you click NO and change your mind later

"In most cases you can get the box back easily—without having to enter the registry. You simply remove that particular user name from the login form.

1. Double-click inside the form field where you normally enter your user name. This will bring up a dropdown list showing all your saved AutoComplete user names.

2. Point (not click) to the one you want to remove, so that it is highlighted, and then hit the Delete key.

3. Once gone, login in again. You should now get the autocomplete box again."


Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Chris Smart <csmart8@...>
 

Hi.

I'm glad you are kean to see your child learn to type on a qwerty keyboard. :)

I didn't learn to tyep on a modified keyboard. in fact, this was back in the 1980's when electric typewriters were common and manuals were still around. Lucky for me, my mom was a secretary at one time in her life, so she knew how to type properly.

Most computer keyboards have tactile markers on the F and J keys on the home ro already, where your index fingers should rest. I guess if you need more tactile marking you could simply add braille labels to a standard keyboard.

The process is about the same today as it was then. learn the home row and gradually add more letters, punctuation etc.

Use the propper fingers on the keys. It helps if whoever is teaching actually types properly as well! that is, no hunting and pecking, two-fingered looking at the keys typing, but propper touch typing without looking at the keys!

Typing to produce things in print for school, letters to my relatives, playing computer games, and other such activities meant that I was typing a lot, learned fast, and was typing at a good 70 words a minute by the time I entered high school. That's considerably faster than I've seen anybody go on a perkins style keyboard. The more you use your new skill to actually accomplish things, the faster it should come.

Learning that way also gave me a basic grasp of how sighted people like to see things laid out on the page. what margins were, centering... important spacial concepts.

I'm not saying go find an old typewriter and learn how I did. There must be some sort of accessible typing tutor software available. :)

Ah, Google just gave me this:
http://www.yesaccessible.com/

That looks like exactly what you need, Typeability 4.0.

I use their other product in my music work, so I can vouch for the excellent quality of David Pinto's scripts and documentation!

Chris

P.S. I hope your child is also using an abacus to learn basic math, to really get the basic principles ingrained early.
--------------------------------------------------
CTS MASTERING: PROFESSIONAL MIXING AND MASTERING!
http://www.ctsmastering.com

Dropbox: Have your stuff when you need it. 2GB is free
http://db.tt/bQ2GuIt


Re: I.E. remembering passwords

Adrian Spratt
 

Ann,

I have three thoughts about your question.

First, as I'm sure you know, some websites enable you to check a box if you
want your user name and/or password to be remembered. NLS is so security
conscious, appropriately, that I doubt it provides this option, but you
could look at its preferences page, or whatever NLS calls it. I know there's
a link to it from the page you arrive at after signing in.

Second, you could check the file menus of your browser, especially "options"
under "tools." I don't recall finding this option in IE8 or earlier or
Firefox. Then again, I've never looked for it.

So, for my one constructive suggestion that occurred to me as I thought
about your question. Once in a great while I have CCleaner delete just about
everything it cares to. This invariably means I have to re-enter user name
and password data even on websites that thought they knew me well. When
this happens, IE asks me if I want it to remember my password. This route
might be the way to invoke the dialog you're seeking.

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 5:41 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: I.E. remembering passwords

Often when I log on to a program for the first time, I.E. asks if I want
Windows to remember the password. Usually I don't, so I check the No
button. For the BARD page I said No, but have changed my mind. Where do I
find the place to check to have windows remember the password
automatically???

Much thanks,

Ann


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: I.E. remembering passwords

Dave...
 

I think you go to Tools/Options and then on the advanced page. Somewhere in
that long list is where you can select.

Dave Carlson
Tastefully composed and transmitted from somewhere in the Western United
States, using a Dell Latitude E6520 and Windows 7

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ann Byrne" <annakb@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 14:41
Subject: I.E. remembering passwords


Often when I log on to a program for the first time, I.E. asks if I
want Windows to remember the password. Usually I don't, so I check
the No button. For the BARD page I said No, but have changed my
mind. Where do I find the place to check to have windows remember
the password automatically???

Much thanks,

Ann


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


I.E. remembering passwords

Ann Byrne
 

Often when I log on to a program for the first time, I.E. asks if I want Windows to remember the password. Usually I don't, so I check the No button. For the BARD page I said No, but have changed my mind. Where do I find the place to check to have windows remember the password automatically???

Much thanks,

Ann


Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Tom Lange
 

Hi,
Besides the Talking Typer program from American Printing House, there is TypeAbility, which was designed by an old friend of mine; it looks pretty good but I haven't used it extensively. There's also Talking Typing Teacher from MarvelSoft. I use it for touch typing instruction where I work. My students seem to find it useful, and, for those with low vision, the screen can be magnified and there are color schemes which make it easier. Be forewarned, though, that tech support for Talking Typing Teacher is absolutely abominable, the worst I've ever run across in my years in the AT business.

If you don't want to spring for one of those programs, good old keyboard help in JAWS (Insert+F1) will put you into keyboard explore mode where all your letters, numbers and punctuation will be spoken, along with other keys. It doesn't do well with modifier keys, though.

Hope this helps.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)" <Ted.Lisle@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 12:09 PM
Subject: RE: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard


I never knew any way to learn touch typing except through orderly
repetition. Our typing teacher taught us the home keys, the home row,
and we gradually expanded from there until we could access the entire
keyboard--rather like learning Morse one character group at a time.

Of course, these were the old black and gray Royals--and I mean old! If
we could do that in 1963, I'm sure she'll do fine.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@...
[mailto:jfw-bounces@...] On Behalf Of Matt Dierckens
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 1:13 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Hi,
There is a great program by American Printing House for the Blind caled
Talking Typer. THis is a great resource for teaching children how to
type. I'm not sure how much it is as an old teacher of mine had it
installed on my computer for me at the time.
Hope this helps a little,
Cheers.

Matt
Sent from my macbook pro

On 2012-03-06, at 1:02 PM, Richard Holloway wrote:

I am a typically sighted parent of a blind child (age 9). I interact
with many other parents of blind children and could use some advice for
my child and to share with other parents.

My daughter was effectively born blind having lost all usable vision
by a few months of age. She learned braille from the start and learned
to type on a perkins brailler first, then started to learn qwerty. She
much prefers to use a braille keyboard on her computer and notetaker
(Apex) as well, keeping a qwerety keyboard plugged in on her computer
for occasional use for certain keys and functions.

My question is this: What is the best way for a blind typist to learn
to use a qwerty keyboard; to do this most efficiently? Is it using JAWS
feedback with the repeating of characters verbally as typed? What about
the braille key caps, or at least braille stickers for keys? (I have
never yet found a USB braille key capped keyboard, only an old PS-2
style unit) I get that touch typing and just pressing down on braille
key caps would be of little use braille-wise, but is is like for sighted
typists, in that it helps get reoriented when your fingers move or you
get distracted, etc., and just to learn qwerty in the beginning? It
would be easy enough to remove the braille and go with a standard
keyboard later on-- conventional keyboards are cheap.

What we end up with as parents is an argument between (mostly
typically-sighted) parents that braille caps are a great idea vs. how
bad of an idea they are to use. I'm not trying to sit in either camp--
I'm wondering which seems to help (and curious about any suggestions of
the best ways to learn qwerty typing without vision).

I don't want to clog up the list too much with this, though it is
JAWS-related, obviously. Please do feel free to reply directly if you
prefer. Your response may be valuable to quite a few parents of younger,
keyboard-learning braille computer users, so thanks for any experience
you may be able to share.

Richard
_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
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Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

I never knew any way to learn touch typing except through orderly
repetition. Our typing teacher taught us the home keys, the home row,
and we gradually expanded from there until we could access the entire
keyboard--rather like learning Morse one character group at a time.

Of course, these were the old black and gray Royals--and I mean old! If
we could do that in 1963, I'm sure she'll do fine.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@...
[mailto:jfw-bounces@...] On Behalf Of Matt Dierckens
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 1:13 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Hi,
There is a great program by American Printing House for the Blind caled
Talking Typer. THis is a great resource for teaching children how to
type. I'm not sure how much it is as an old teacher of mine had it
installed on my computer for me at the time.
Hope this helps a little,
Cheers.

Matt
Sent from my macbook pro

On 2012-03-06, at 1:02 PM, Richard Holloway wrote:

I am a typically sighted parent of a blind child (age 9). I interact
with many other parents of blind children and could use some advice for
my child and to share with other parents.

My daughter was effectively born blind having lost all usable vision
by a few months of age. She learned braille from the start and learned
to type on a perkins brailler first, then started to learn qwerty. She
much prefers to use a braille keyboard on her computer and notetaker
(Apex) as well, keeping a qwerety keyboard plugged in on her computer
for occasional use for certain keys and functions.

My question is this: What is the best way for a blind typist to learn
to use a qwerty keyboard; to do this most efficiently? Is it using JAWS
feedback with the repeating of characters verbally as typed? What about
the braille key caps, or at least braille stickers for keys? (I have
never yet found a USB braille key capped keyboard, only an old PS-2
style unit) I get that touch typing and just pressing down on braille
key caps would be of little use braille-wise, but is is like for sighted
typists, in that it helps get reoriented when your fingers move or you
get distracted, etc., and just to learn qwerty in the beginning? It
would be easy enough to remove the braille and go with a standard
keyboard later on-- conventional keyboards are cheap.

What we end up with as parents is an argument between (mostly
typically-sighted) parents that braille caps are a great idea vs. how
bad of an idea they are to use. I'm not trying to sit in either camp--
I'm wondering which seems to help (and curious about any suggestions of
the best ways to learn qwerty typing without vision).

I don't want to clog up the list too much with this, though it is
JAWS-related, obviously. Please do feel free to reply directly if you
prefer. Your response may be valuable to quite a few parents of younger,
keyboard-learning braille computer users, so thanks for any experience
you may be able to share.

Richard
_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com
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Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Jimmy Jones
 

Usually you place markers on strategic keys. H and j on home row as well as
the enter key on that row. Maybe on the backspace and tab.

The three programs that are available for purchase is Talking Typer (APh)
Talking typing Teacher (Marval-soft) Typability but I don't know its maker.

There are also typing classess offered through the Hadley School for the
blind in Winnetka Il.

Hope this helps

Jimmy

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of Richard Holloway
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 1:03 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

I am a typically sighted parent of a blind child (age 9). I interact with
many other parents of blind children and could use some advice for my child
and to share with other parents.

My daughter was effectively born blind having lost all usable vision by a
few months of age. She learned braille from the start and learned to type on
a perkins brailler first, then started to learn qwerty. She much prefers to
use a braille keyboard on her computer and notetaker (Apex) as well, keeping
a qwerety keyboard plugged in on her computer for occasional use for certain
keys and functions.

My question is this: What is the best way for a blind typist to learn to use
a qwerty keyboard; to do this most efficiently? Is it using JAWS feedback
with the repeating of characters verbally as typed? What about the braille
key caps, or at least braille stickers for keys? (I have never yet found a
USB braille key capped keyboard, only an old PS-2 style unit) I get that
touch typing and just pressing down on braille key caps would be of little
use braille-wise, but is is like for sighted typists, in that it helps get
reoriented when your fingers move or you get distracted, etc., and just to
learn qwerty in the beginning? It would be easy enough to remove the braille
and go with a standard keyboard later on-- conventional keyboards are cheap.

What we end up with as parents is an argument between (mostly
typically-sighted) parents that braille caps are a great idea vs. how bad of
an idea they are to use. I'm not trying to sit in either camp-- I'm
wondering which seems to help (and curious about any suggestions of the best
ways to learn qwerty typing without vision).

I don't want to clog up the list too much with this, though it is
JAWS-related, obviously. Please do feel free to reply directly if you
prefer. Your response may be valuable to quite a few parents of younger,
keyboard-learning braille computer users, so thanks for any experience you
may be able to share.

Richard
_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@...
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Matt Dierckens <matt.dierckens@...>
 

Hi,
There is a great program by American Printing House for the Blind caled Talking Typer. THis is a great resource for teaching children how to type. I'm not sure how much it is as an old teacher of mine had it installed on my computer for me at the time.
Hope this helps a little,
Cheers.

Matt
Sent from my macbook pro

On 2012-03-06, at 1:02 PM, Richard Holloway wrote:

I am a typically sighted parent of a blind child (age 9). I interact with many other parents of blind children and could use some advice for my child and to share with other parents.

My daughter was effectively born blind having lost all usable vision by a few months of age. She learned braille from the start and learned to type on a perkins brailler first, then started to learn qwerty. She much prefers to use a braille keyboard on her computer and notetaker (Apex) as well, keeping a qwerety keyboard plugged in on her computer for occasional use for certain keys and functions.

My question is this: What is the best way for a blind typist to learn to use a qwerty keyboard; to do this most efficiently? Is it using JAWS feedback with the repeating of characters verbally as typed? What about the braille key caps, or at least braille stickers for keys? (I have never yet found a USB braille key capped keyboard, only an old PS-2 style unit) I get that touch typing and just pressing down on braille key caps would be of little use braille-wise, but is is like for sighted typists, in that it helps get reoriented when your fingers move or you get distracted, etc., and just to learn qwerty in the beginning? It would be easy enough to remove the braille and go with a standard keyboard later on-- conventional keyboards are cheap.

What we end up with as parents is an argument between (mostly typically-sighted) parents that braille caps are a great idea vs. how bad of an idea they are to use. I'm not trying to sit in either camp-- I'm wondering which seems to help (and curious about any suggestions of the best ways to learn qwerty typing without vision).

I don't want to clog up the list too much with this, though it is JAWS-related, obviously. Please do feel free to reply directly if you prefer. Your response may be valuable to quite a few parents of younger, keyboard-learning braille computer users, so thanks for any experience you may be able to share.

Richard
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Learning Jaws and the Keyboard

Richard Holloway
 

I am a typically sighted parent of a blind child (age 9). I interact with many other parents of blind children and could use some advice for my child and to share with other parents.

My daughter was effectively born blind having lost all usable vision by a few months of age. She learned braille from the start and learned to type on a perkins brailler first, then started to learn qwerty. She much prefers to use a braille keyboard on her computer and notetaker (Apex) as well, keeping a qwerety keyboard plugged in on her computer for occasional use for certain keys and functions.

My question is this: What is the best way for a blind typist to learn to use a qwerty keyboard; to do this most efficiently? Is it using JAWS feedback with the repeating of characters verbally as typed? What about the braille key caps, or at least braille stickers for keys? (I have never yet found a USB braille key capped keyboard, only an old PS-2 style unit) I get that touch typing and just pressing down on braille key caps would be of little use braille-wise, but is is like for sighted typists, in that it helps get reoriented when your fingers move or you get distracted, etc., and just to learn qwerty in the beginning? It would be easy enough to remove the braille and go with a standard keyboard later on-- conventional keyboards are cheap.

What we end up with as parents is an argument between (mostly typically-sighted) parents that braille caps are a great idea vs. how bad of an idea they are to use. I'm not trying to sit in either camp-- I'm wondering which seems to help (and curious about any suggestions of the best ways to learn qwerty typing without vision).

I don't want to clog up the list too much with this, though it is JAWS-related, obviously. Please do feel free to reply directly if you prefer. Your response may be valuable to quite a few parents of younger, keyboard-learning braille computer users, so thanks for any experience you may be able to share.

Richard


Re: JAWS not speaking the minimize maximize and close symbol

John Martyn <johnrobertmartyn@...>
 

I figured out the problem. Windows 7 is all jacked up on this other laptop.
Needs to be reloaded because there are other mystery problems as well I
discovered. I had reloaded jaws and everything. Thanks for all your
suggestions.
John

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of Mike & Barbara
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 7:18 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Re: JAWS not speaking the minimize maximize and close symbol

Hi John,

There is a keystroke, Insert + the END, that is the E N D, key, that is
supposed to read the top line of the active window, is this the keystrroke
that you are using to access the top line? If you are running Widows7 &
this keystroke is not working, you might have to change the Theme in the
Theme Gallery to Windows Classic. Below is how to change this.

1. While on the desktop press the F5 key to make sure that nothing is
selected.
2. Press the applications key, arrow down to Personalize & press enter.
3. You will now be in the Themes Gallery. here the different themes are in
columns. To find the Windows Classic Theme, arrow down to Windows7 Basic, &
right arrow 1 time, this should place you on Windows Classic now, just press
enter.

One other thing to suggest is, did you route the Jaws cursor to the PC
cursor, press the page-up button to take the cursor to the top of the page,
to see if the symbols are there?! I know you are a very knowledgeable
computer user & know about what I've mentioned above but, I just thought I
would throw in my 2 cents worth in case you overlooked something. Take
care.
Mike
P. S., Please let the list know how you finally get this resolved.




----- Original Message -----
From: John Martyn
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Sent: Monday, March 05, 2012 7:26 PM
Subject: JAWS not speaking the minimize maximize and close symbol


While doing some testing on some software, I noticed on another computer
that it doesn't read the minimize maximize and close button symbols at the
top of the window, it only reading the title of the window. This window
does
not close with alt+F4 either and I need to click the close button. It is
doing this for all applications on this system so the JAWS cursor doesn't
see the buttons. Has anyone encountered this issue and possibly a fix?
Thanks in advance,
John Martyn


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Re: list boxes

T. Civitello
 

I am using IE 8 and Jfw 13. Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bissett, Tom" <tom.bissett@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 8:51 AM
Subject: RE: list boxes


Interesting, I am using jaws11 and I e8.
What versions are you using?
Tom Bisset
-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...] On Behalf Of tcivi31
Sent: March 6, 2012 11:28 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Re: list boxes

I have tried this but the Alt down arrow doesn't open the list box and thus
the down arrow doesn't move the selection down the list. Tom
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bissett, Tom" <tom.bissett@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 7:26 AM
Subject: RE: list boxes


I find that the second announcement of what you are on e.g. language you
can go into forms mode and use alt down arrow to open the drop down and it
seems to work fine. It just doesn't tell you that it is a drop down.

Tom Bisset
-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of tcivi31
Sent: March 5, 2012 10:11 PM
To: Jaws List
Subject: list boxes

How does one access the list boxes on the knew Google advanced search
page?
Tom


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Re: list boxes

Bissett, Tom <tom.bissett@...>
 

Interesting, I am using jaws11 and I e8.
What versions are you using?
Tom Bisset

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...] On Behalf Of tcivi31
Sent: March 6, 2012 11:28 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Subject: Re: list boxes

I have tried this but the Alt down arrow doesn't open the list box and thus
the down arrow doesn't move the selection down the list. Tom
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bissett, Tom" <tom.bissett@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 7:26 AM
Subject: RE: list boxes


I find that the second announcement of what you are on e.g. language you
can go into forms mode and use alt down arrow to open the drop down and it
seems to work fine. It just doesn't tell you that it is a drop down.

Tom Bisset
-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of tcivi31
Sent: March 5, 2012 10:11 PM
To: Jaws List
Subject: list boxes

How does one access the list boxes on the knew Google advanced search
page?
Tom


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Re: list boxes

T. Civitello
 

No I don't have auto forms mode on but I do press enter and hear the click and forms mode on. Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: "Farfar at Work" <dgcarlson@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 8:38 AM
Subject: Re: list boxes


Do you have auto forms mode on, and do you hear the audible click before you
attempt to open the list?

Dave Carlson
Tastefully composed and transmitted from somewhere in the Western United
States, using a Dell Latitude E6520 and Windows 7


----- Original Message -----
From: "tcivi31" <tcivi31@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 08:28
Subject: Re: list boxes


I have tried this but the Alt down arrow doesn't open the list box and thus
the down arrow doesn't move the selection down the list. Tom
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bissett, Tom" <tom.bissett@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 7:26 AM
Subject: RE: list boxes


I find that the second announcement of what you are on e.g. language you
can go into forms mode and use alt down arrow to open the drop down and it
seems to work fine. It just doesn't tell you that it is a drop down.

Tom Bisset
-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...]
On Behalf Of tcivi31
Sent: March 5, 2012 10:11 PM
To: Jaws List
Subject: list boxes

How does one access the list boxes on the knew Google advanced search
page?
Tom


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Re: list boxes

Roger Loran Bailey <rogerbailey81@...>
 

I have found that sometimes these list and combo boxes behave differently. Sometimes it works to just click on the box and down arrow. Sometimes it is necessary to click on the box and hold down the alt key while down arrowing. Sometimes it is necessary to click on the box and hold hold down the alt key while down arrowing once and then right arrowing once and then releasing the alt key and then down arrowing. Sometimes it is necessary to click on the box and then while holding down the alt key right arrowing and then while continuing to hold the alt key down arrowing. Try different variations of this and see if any of them work.

On 3/6/2012 11:28 AM, tcivi31 wrote:
I have tried this but the Alt down arrow doesn't open the list box and thus the down arrow doesn't move the selection down the list. Tom
----- Original Message ----- From: "Bissett, Tom" <tom.bissett@...>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 06, 2012 7:26 AM
Subject: RE: list boxes


I find that the second announcement of what you are on e.g. language you can go into forms mode and use alt down arrow to open the drop down and it seems to work fine. It just doesn't tell you that it is a drop down.

Tom Bisset
-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@... [mailto:jfw-bounces@...] On Behalf Of tcivi31
Sent: March 5, 2012 10:11 PM
To: Jaws List
Subject: list boxes

How does one access the list boxes on the knew Google advanced search page?
Tom


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