Date   
moderated Re: Groups.iio All List Query

James Homuth
 

One-time only email accounts are virtually pointless for a mailing list, however, and many mailing list providers (including this one) ban them.
 
Also: Gmail doesn't need to specifically offer anonymous email accounts. Anyone with an internet connection can create an account and make available any information they please, the same as Yahoo Mail and outlook.com. That's why it's a spammer's haven.



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Longmore
Sent: June-14-18 2:06 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Groups.iio All List Query

 Email has become more secure and there are ways to make it even more secure. Also Gmail offers anonymous email accounts and other companies offer one time only email accounts. 


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 11:28:05 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Groups.iio All List Query
 
On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 07:45 pm, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:
It shows your email address which anybody on the list can also see by going to the “From” field in the email header.
As it does, and has since cyber-time immemorial.

I have no idea why anyone thinks that their e-mail address is private.  It is not, it has never been, when you send a message to anyone.  You, any you, do not send e-mail messages anonymously.  Your e-mail address, as well as a lot of other more detailed information about where the message originated and how it made it to its destination, are part of the headers of each and every e-mail message; it's just that those are not displayed normally because they're not of interest.  E-mail also is not secure in any meaningful sense, either.  It is, and always has been, incredibly simple to intercept and is very, very seldom encrypted.  It's far less secure, both practically and legally, than conventional postal mail is.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

     Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

         ~ Mark Twain

moderated Image for windows

Nino Dagostino
 

Hi:

 

Does anybody have the terabyte image for windows manual in pdf?

 

If you can could you please send it to me.

 

I cant find it.

 

 

moderated Re: Groups.iio All List Query

Dan Longmore
 

 Email has become more secure and there are ways to make it even more secure. Also Gmail offers anonymous email accounts and other companies offer one time only email accounts. 


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 11:28:05 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Groups.iio All List Query
 
On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 07:45 pm, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:
It shows your email address which anybody on the list can also see by going to the “From” field in the email header.
As it does, and has since cyber-time immemorial.

I have no idea why anyone thinks that their e-mail address is private.  It is not, it has never been, when you send a message to anyone.  You, any you, do not send e-mail messages anonymously.  Your e-mail address, as well as a lot of other more detailed information about where the message originated and how it made it to its destination, are part of the headers of each and every e-mail message; it's just that those are not displayed normally because they're not of interest.  E-mail also is not secure in any meaningful sense, either.  It is, and always has been, incredibly simple to intercept and is very, very seldom encrypted.  It's far less secure, both practically and legally, than conventional postal mail is.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

     Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

         ~ Mark Twain

moderated Only One PDF Document Open At a Time - How Can This Be Changed?

Rahul Bajaj
 

Hi All,

I use Windows 10 with JAWS 16. The problem described in the subject is
a key obstacle for me that is greatly reducing my efficiency. I have
to constantly press ctrl+tab to jump from one PDF to another and also
lose my place in the document when I do this. How can I keep open
multiple PDFs in separate windows at the same time?

Best,
Rahul

moderated Re: The way to get a screenshot using windows10 and Jaws

Dale Heltzer
 

I stand corrected on the file format – it *is png, not jpg.

However, on *my Dell laptop, the PrintScreen key alone does put an image file in the Screenshots Folder.

JAWS OCR may be brought up with the Applications key and used on the file directly.

Be well

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 5:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The way to get a screenshot using windows10 and Jaws

 

Dale,

       You must hit Windows Key+Prt Sc to have a full screen screen shot automatically saved in the Pictures\Screenshots folder in PNG format.

        Hitting PrtSc alone places a full screen screen shot on the clipboard, but if you want to have it saved you need to open an image manipulation program such as Paint, paste it, then save it.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

     Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

         ~ Mark Twain

moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Dr. Aleksander Pavkovic <a.pavkovic@...>
 

Well, that depends pretty much on the hardware in use. There are even scanners running a firmware that can directly perform an OCR and, thus, create quite accessible PDFs even without a computer.

Best regards,
Aleksander

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---

Von: "Rahul Bajaj" <rahul.bajaj1038@...> Wichtigkeit Normal
Lesebestätigung wurde nicht angefordert
Gesendet am: Do, 14. Juni 2018 21:04:02
An: main@jfw.groups.io;
CC:
Betreff: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document
Verwendetes Mailprogramm: vermutlich online im WEB erstellt

Thanks, everyone. Just to be clear, the objective here is to ensure
that the document that is scanned and saved as a PDF is itself
accessible, not to make an inaccessible PDF accessible.

This being the case, I'm curious to know how Ralf's suggestion would
operate in practice. Does one get an option during the scanning
process that enables you to save a document as a printable PDF? It
would be helpful if you could comment on what specifically a person
scanning a hard copy file needs to do to make sure that the PDF that
she is saving is accessible. Apart from running it through an OCR
engine, that is.

Best,
Rahul



On 14/06/2018, Dr. Aleksander Pavkovic <a.pavkovic@...> wrote:
... And if You save as PDF from within Office 2016, you can also cause
Office to save it as a tagged PDF, meaning that you will also have headings,
numbered or unnumbered lists etc., supposed they are set up correctly within
the office document (Word, for example) using layout styles. Thus, the PDF
file is really accessible and can be navigated just like a (well-designed,
accessible) HTML document.

Best regards,
Aleksander

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: "Sieghard Weitzel" <@Sieghard> Wichtigkeit Normal
Lesebestätigung wurde nicht angefordert
Gesendet am: Do, 14. Juni 2018 14:30:56
An: "main@jfw.groups.io" <main@jfw.groups.io>;
CC:
Betreff: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document
Verwendetes Mailprogramm: Microsoft Firmennetzwerk

Sorry, I forgot to mention that in Office 2016 you can save a file as a
PDF directly as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi Rahul:

You are right: there are two kinds of pdf files.

1. scanned images, which are not accessible without using OCR.

2. text-based pdf files, where the text has been prepared by, say, MS Word
or other word processing software and then saved as a .pdf file.

Since there is no way to really tell, visually, what type of pdf file you
have, a sighted person may not even realize that they are sending you a
file you can't access directly.

Where this presents extra difficulty is if you, the visually impaired
person, is the one who is going to not read, but also process, the
document. Maybe you're expected to edit or translate the document and ,
god help you, prefer the format. Exploding formats are the curse in my
profession (I'm a translator).

I believe pdf files can be imported in Word 2016, I seem to have read that
somewhere.

To convert an image-based pdf file, software such as Adobe PDF Transformer
is a good tool, though the accessibility is a bit tricky at times, if you
need to change the parameters, such as keeping normal layout, recognize a
language other than English, etc.

Properly tagging a pdf file makes it more accessible. Again, since it
doesn't make a hill of beans of difference to the sighted user if a pdf
file is poorly tagged, we often get files that are problematic. Try the
JAWS help, applications, adobe, and there should be, if I'm not
misremembering, something about how to prepare accessible documents.

Hope it helps, and good luck.

Gudrun


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rahul
Bajaj
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they can
make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some help in
terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be designed in
an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without using
the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is completely
inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to make a PDF
accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after scanning the
document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most scanners contain
a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with a third party
application such as fine reader? This organization would be averse to the
idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to propose a solution that
is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of making a
PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul














moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Rahul Bajaj
 

Thanks, everyone. Just to be clear, the objective here is to ensure
that the document that is scanned and saved as a PDF is itself
accessible, not to make an inaccessible PDF accessible.

This being the case, I'm curious to know how Ralf's suggestion would
operate in practice. Does one get an option during the scanning
process that enables you to save a document as a printable PDF? It
would be helpful if you could comment on what specifically a person
scanning a hard copy file needs to do to make sure that the PDF that
she is saving is accessible. Apart from running it through an OCR
engine, that is.

Best,
Rahul

On 14/06/2018, Dr. Aleksander Pavkovic <a.pavkovic@...> wrote:
... And if You save as PDF from within Office 2016, you can also cause
Office to save it as a tagged PDF, meaning that you will also have headings,
numbered or unnumbered lists etc., supposed they are set up correctly within
the office document (Word, for example) using layout styles. Thus, the PDF
file is really accessible and can be navigated just like a (well-designed,
accessible) HTML document.

Best regards,
Aleksander

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: "Sieghard Weitzel" <@Sieghard> Wichtigkeit Normal
Lesebestätigung wurde nicht angefordert
Gesendet am: Do, 14. Juni 2018 14:30:56
An: "main@jfw.groups.io" <main@jfw.groups.io>;
CC:
Betreff: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document
Verwendetes Mailprogramm: Microsoft Firmennetzwerk

Sorry, I forgot to mention that in Office 2016 you can save a file as a
PDF directly as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi Rahul:

You are right: there are two kinds of pdf files.

1. scanned images, which are not accessible without using OCR.

2. text-based pdf files, where the text has been prepared by, say, MS Word
or other word processing software and then saved as a .pdf file.

Since there is no way to really tell, visually, what type of pdf file you
have, a sighted person may not even realize that they are sending you a
file you can't access directly.

Where this presents extra difficulty is if you, the visually impaired
person, is the one who is going to not read, but also process, the
document. Maybe you're expected to edit or translate the document and ,
god help you, prefer the format. Exploding formats are the curse in my
profession (I'm a translator).

I believe pdf files can be imported in Word 2016, I seem to have read that
somewhere.

To convert an image-based pdf file, software such as Adobe PDF Transformer
is a good tool, though the accessibility is a bit tricky at times, if you
need to change the parameters, such as keeping normal layout, recognize a
language other than English, etc.

Properly tagging a pdf file makes it more accessible. Again, since it
doesn't make a hill of beans of difference to the sighted user if a pdf
file is poorly tagged, we often get files that are problematic. Try the
JAWS help, applications, adobe, and there should be, if I'm not
misremembering, something about how to prepare accessible documents.

Hope it helps, and good luck.

Gudrun


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rahul
Bajaj
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they can
make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some help in
terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be designed in
an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without using
the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is completely
inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to make a PDF
accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after scanning the
document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most scanners contain
a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with a third party
application such as fine reader? This organization would be averse to the
idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to propose a solution that
is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of making a
PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul













moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Dr. Aleksander Pavkovic <a.pavkovic@...>
 

... And if You save as PDF from within Office 2016, you can also cause Office to save it as a tagged PDF, meaning that you will also have headings, numbered or unnumbered lists etc., supposed they are set up correctly within the office document (Word, for example) using layout styles. Thus, the PDF file is really accessible and can be navigated just like a (well-designed, accessible) HTML document.

Best regards,
Aleksander

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---

Von: "Sieghard Weitzel" <@Sieghard> Wichtigkeit Normal
Lesebestätigung wurde nicht angefordert
Gesendet am: Do, 14. Juni 2018 14:30:56
An: "main@jfw.groups.io" <main@jfw.groups.io>;
CC:
Betreff: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document
Verwendetes Mailprogramm: Microsoft Firmennetzwerk

Sorry, I forgot to mention that in Office 2016 you can save a file as a PDF directly as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi Rahul:

You are right: there are two kinds of pdf files.

1. scanned images, which are not accessible without using OCR.

2. text-based pdf files, where the text has been prepared by, say, MS Word or other word processing software and then saved as a .pdf file.

Since there is no way to really tell, visually, what type of pdf file you have, a sighted person may not even realize that they are sending you a file you can't access directly.

Where this presents extra difficulty is if you, the visually impaired person, is the one who is going to not read, but also process, the document. Maybe you're expected to edit or translate the document and , god help you, prefer the format. Exploding formats are the curse in my profession (I'm a translator).

I believe pdf files can be imported in Word 2016, I seem to have read that somewhere.

To convert an image-based pdf file, software such as Adobe PDF Transformer is a good tool, though the accessibility is a bit tricky at times, if you need to change the parameters, such as keeping normal layout, recognize a language other than English, etc.

Properly tagging a pdf file makes it more accessible. Again, since it doesn't make a hill of beans of difference to the sighted user if a pdf file is poorly tagged, we often get files that are problematic. Try the JAWS help, applications, adobe, and there should be, if I'm not misremembering, something about how to prepare accessible documents.

Hope it helps, and good luck.

Gudrun


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rahul Bajaj
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they can make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some help in terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be designed in an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without using the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is completely inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to make a PDF accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after scanning the document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most scanners contain a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with a third party application such as fine reader? This organization would be averse to the idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to propose a solution that is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of making a PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul










moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Ralf Kefferpuetz
 

Hello,
Most scanners come with an OCR program.
The easiest way to create a accessible PDF document is to print your document to a PDF printer. That creates a PDF document.

Regards,
Ralf

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rahul Bajaj
Sent: Donnerstag, 14. Juni 2018 16:05
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they can make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some help in terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be designed in an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without using the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is completely inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to make a PDF accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after scanning the document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most scanners contain a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with a third party application such as fine reader? This organization would be averse to the idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to propose a solution that is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of making a PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul

moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

 

Sorry, I forgot to mention that in Office 2016 you can save a file as a PDF directly as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi Rahul:

You are right: there are two kinds of pdf files.

1. scanned images, which are not accessible without using OCR.

2. text-based pdf files, where the text has been prepared by, say, MS Word or other word processing software and then saved as a .pdf file.

Since there is no way to really tell, visually, what type of pdf file you have, a sighted person may not even realize that they are sending you a file you can't access directly.

Where this presents extra difficulty is if you, the visually impaired person, is the one who is going to not read, but also process, the document. Maybe you're expected to edit or translate the document and , god help you, prefer the format. Exploding formats are the curse in my profession (I'm a translator).

I believe pdf files can be imported in Word 2016, I seem to have read that somewhere.

To convert an image-based pdf file, software such as Adobe PDF Transformer is a good tool, though the accessibility is a bit tricky at times, if you need to change the parameters, such as keeping normal layout, recognize a language other than English, etc.

Properly tagging a pdf file makes it more accessible. Again, since it doesn't make a hill of beans of difference to the sighted user if a pdf file is poorly tagged, we often get files that are problematic. Try the JAWS help, applications, adobe, and there should be, if I'm not misremembering, something about how to prepare accessible documents.

Hope it helps, and good luck.

Gudrun


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rahul Bajaj
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they can make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some help in terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be designed in an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without using the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is completely inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to make a PDF accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after scanning the document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most scanners contain a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with a third party application such as fine reader? This organization would be averse to the idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to propose a solution that is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of making a PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul

moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

 

Windows 10 includes the "Microsoft Printt to PDF" printer. If you have a document in an app such as Word or Excel or in any other application which can print, you can select this PDF printer as the printer. It will then ask you to save the document and once it is saved you can open the PDF file and it will be accessible. How formatting will be preserved in all situations I don't know, but I use this method to make PDF files out of reports from my point of sale software and while they aren't always perfect, I can usually read them.
In Windows 7 there was no included PDF printer and I used an application from Nuance called "Power PDF". It does cost I think $50 or something like that, but it adds a PDF printer similar to the one found in Windows 10 except it's of course called "Nuance Print to PDF" or something like that and the application can also be used to split a PDF document, e.g. I sometimes had a supplier sent me two separate invoices in a single PDF file. I could open this file in the Power PDF application and then extract the page or pages for the first invoice and save it, then I could save the pages for the second invoice etc. This would then give me a separate PDF file for each invoice. Of course if the PDF was a scan, i.e. an image file, the resulting two files were also image files and I could only read them by using the Jaws OCR function.

If you have Windows 10 you can simply try it, go into Notepad or Word, type some text or open a document and then go to print, select "Microsoft Print to PDF", save the file and then check out the resulting PDF.


Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rahul Bajaj
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they can make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some help in terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be designed in an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without using the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is completely inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to make a PDF accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after scanning the document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most scanners contain a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with a third party application such as fine reader? This organization would be averse to the idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to propose a solution that is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of making a PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul

moderated Re: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Gudrun Brunot
 

Hi Rahul:

You are right: there are two kinds of pdf files.

1. scanned images, which are not accessible without using OCR.

2. text-based pdf files, where the text has been prepared by, say, MS Word or other word processing software and then saved as a .pdf file.

Since there is no way to really tell, visually, what type of pdf file you have, a sighted person may not even realize that they are sending you a file you can't access directly.

Where this presents extra difficulty is if you, the visually impaired person, is the one who is going to not read, but also process, the document. Maybe you're expected to edit or translate the document and , god help you, prefer the format. Exploding formats are the curse in my profession (I'm a translator).

I believe pdf files can be imported in Word 2016, I seem to have read that somewhere.

To convert an image-based pdf file, software such as Adobe PDF Transformer is a good tool, though the accessibility is a bit tricky at times, if you need to change the parameters, such as keeping normal layout, recognize a language other than English, etc.

Properly tagging a pdf file makes it more accessible. Again, since it doesn't make a hill of beans of difference to the sighted user if a pdf file is poorly tagged, we often get files that are problematic. Try the JAWS help, applications, adobe, and there should be, if I'm not misremembering, something about how to prepare accessible documents.

Hope it helps, and good luck.

Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rahul Bajaj
Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they
can make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some
help in terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be
designed in an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without
using the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is
completely inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to
make a PDF accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after
scanning the document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most
scanners contain a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with
a third party application such as fine reader? This organization would
be averse to the idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to
propose a solution that is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of
making a PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul

moderated Creating an Accessible PDf Document

Rahul Bajaj
 

Hi everyone,

I have to make a representation to a large institution as to how they
can make their documents accessible, so I'd really appreciate some
help in terms of understanding the nuts and bolts of how a PDF can be
designed in an accessible format.

As I understand it, if a document is scanned with a scanner, without
using the OCR feature, it ends up as a scanned image that is
completely inaccessible and unsearchable. As a result, the only way to
make a PDF accessible from its inception is to use an OCR engine after
scanning the document. Is my understanding accurate? Further, do most
scanners contain a built in OCR feature, or can this only be done with
a third party application such as fine reader? This organization would
be averse to the idea of purchasing a third party app, so I need to
propose a solution that is cost effective.

Apart from using OCR, are there any other less cumbersome ways of
making a PDF accessible from inception? Forgive me for my ignorance.

Best,
Rahul

moderated Re: Groups.iio All List Query

James Homuth
 

There is no security risk in having your own email address displayed to you when you receive a message from this or any other group. It's a feature put in place to attempt to solve the problem of people not remembering which email address they've subscribed to the group with. As an admin for several years who's had to answer a few of those questions, this is honestly about time.
 
also, it's worth pointing out that if you've ever sent an email to this list, people already have your email address. There's no practical way to hide it except to subscribe and never actually send a message to the list. The moment you do, your email address is visible to anyone who receives list traffic by email. If there was a security concern at all, that would be it.
 
James,
List Admin



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: June-14-18 4:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Groups.iio All List Query

Hello Mike:
 
In my case, when I go to the bottom of the message and UP ARROW once, there is a line containing the link to unsubscribe, followed by a space, then comes my email address, surrounded by square brackets.
 
Should our email addresses appear at the bottom of our email messages at all. If they should not, then the list owner or the administrators should take steps to prevent it from happening, as soon as possible.
 
Sincerely:
 
Dave Durber
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Mike B.
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 6:22 AM
Subject: Groups.iio All List Query

Hi All,
 
I noticed something today that I've never noticed before at the bottom of any email that I receive from a Groups.io email list / club.  If I go to the bottom of any email, arrow up a couple of times, and right below the unsubscribe link is my email address!
 
Would y'all please check any email you get from any Groups.io list you're a member for what I described above, and let me know if you're seeing your email address at the bottom of each email, or if you're seeing someone elses' email address?
 
All input on this matter will be greatly appreciated!  Thank you very very much!
Take Care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sent from my iBarstool.

moderated Re: reading a PDF file

Lisa
 

You could try control+shift+N and type the page number.

Lisa

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of kevin meyers
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 2:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: reading a PDF file

 

Hello,

I was attempting to get some documentation from a web site. There was a link to get a PDF file. Once the PDF was open I couldn’t get past the first page. I would do a control page down and would not change to the next page. Is there a different key stroke I should be using now using Windows 10 and Jaws2018?

 

 

Kevin Meyers

414-839-0635

 

moderated Re: Groups.iio All List Query

Gerald Levy
 

 
And why is this a problem?  This is all much ado about nothing.  For those of you who are obsessed over the fact that your email address appears at the bottom of a message, there is a simple solution.  Just stop sending and receiving email messages altogether, and your troubles will be over.  Enough is enough already.
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 4:55 AM
Subject: Re: Groups.iio All List Query
 
Hello Mike:
 
In my case, when I go to the bottom of the message and UP ARROW once, there is a line containing the link to unsubscribe, followed by a space, then comes my email address, surrounded by square brackets.
 
Should our email addresses appear at the bottom of our email messages at all. If they should not, then the list owner or the administrators should take steps to prevent it from happening, as soon as possible.
 
Sincerely:
 
Dave Durber
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Mike B.
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 6:22 AM
Subject: Groups.iio All List Query
 
Hi All,
 
I noticed something today that I've never noticed before at the bottom of any email that I receive from a Groups.io email list / club.  If I go to the bottom of any email, arrow up a couple of times, and right below the unsubscribe link is my email address!
 
Would y'all please check any email you get from any Groups.io list you're a member for what I described above, and let me know if you're seeing your email address at the bottom of each email, or if you're seeing someone elses' email address?
 
All input on this matter will be greatly appreciated!  Thank you very very much!
Take Care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sent from my iBarstool.

moderated Groups.iio All List Query

Dave Durber
 

Hello Mike:

I just checked three user lists which are located on three different email providers. My email address does not appear anywhere below the where email messages or responses appear.

Sincerely:

Dave Durber

moderated Re: Groups.iio All List Query

Dave Durber
 

Hello Mike:
 
In my case, when I go to the bottom of the message and UP ARROW once, there is a line containing the link to unsubscribe, followed by a space, then comes my email address, surrounded by square brackets.

 
Should our email addresses appear at the bottom of our email messages at all. If they should not, then the list owner or the administrators should take steps to prevent it from happening, as soon as possible.
 
Sincerely:
 
Dave Durber
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Mike B.
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 6:22 AM
Subject: Groups.iio All List Query

Hi All,
 
I noticed something today that I've never noticed before at the bottom of any email that I receive from a Groups.io email list / club.  If I go to the bottom of any email, arrow up a couple of times, and right below the unsubscribe link is my email address!
 
Would y'all please check any email you get from any Groups.io list you're a member for what I described above, and let me know if you're seeing your email address at the bottom of each email, or if you're seeing someone elses' email address?
 
All input on this matter will be greatly appreciated!  Thank you very very much!
Take Care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sent from my iBarstool.

moderated Re: Office 365 Help please

Lynne Moore
 

HI Everyone,
I apologize for the previous message, I failed to look at the address I was sending to.  Anyway, I wanted to take this opportunity to once again thank everyone who responded to my plea for help, it was very kind.  I very much appreciate it.
Lynne Moore
 

Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2018 2:59 AM
Subject: Re: Office 365 Help please
 
Hi Richard,
Thanks for your advice.  I appreciate it very much.
Lynne Moore
 
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 7:51 AM
Subject: Re: Office 365 Help please
 
If you have Office 365, and you left Outlook 2010 installed, there is your problem. Office 365 installs Outlook 2016. You should not be running two versions together. At least that is my understanding. Even though it may not be jaws related, you use Jaws, so I'd highly suggest calling Microsoft accessibility: 1-800-936-5900.
Richard


"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime." - Mark Twain


 


On Jun 12, 2018, at 2:44 AM, Lynne Moore <lynne57moore@...> wrote:

Hello,
I was wondering if one of you kind souls would mind giving me some help.  I’m having a problem with office 365, microsoft outlook 2010 and Windows 7.  The problem isn’t JAWS-related, so I can’t discuss it on the list.  If anyone would be willing to help, could you write me privately at lynne57moore@...?  Thank you.
Lynne Moore

moderated Re: Office 365 Help please

Lynne Moore
 

Hi Richard,
Thanks for your advice.  I appreciate it very much.
Lynne Moore
 

Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 7:51 AM
Subject: Re: Office 365 Help please
 
If you have Office 365, and you left Outlook 2010 installed, there is your problem. Office 365 installs Outlook 2016. You should not be running two versions together. At least that is my understanding. Even though it may not be jaws related, you use Jaws, so I'd highly suggest calling Microsoft accessibility: 1-800-936-5900.
Richard


"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime." - Mark Twain


 


On Jun 12, 2018, at 2:44 AM, Lynne Moore <lynne57moore@...> wrote:

Hello,
I was wondering if one of you kind souls would mind giving me some help.  I’m having a problem with office 365, microsoft outlook 2010 and Windows 7.  The problem isn’t JAWS-related, so I can’t discuss it on the list.  If anyone would be willing to help, could you write me privately at lynne57moore@...?  Thank you.
Lynne Moore