Date   

moderated Re: Casper

netbat66
 

version 8 does and is the most accessible.

-----Original Message-----
From: Nino Dagostino
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 4:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Casper



Hi:



Will the older versions of Casper work in windows10?



Thanks


moderated Re: Email inbox

Nino Dagostino
 

Hi:

 

That’s a good idea, thanks

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of paul lemm
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 10:19 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Email inbox

 

Hi,

 

I’m not sure that’s possible since most  email clients sort emails in a specific order (usually by date received), however, although this isn’t a perfect solution by anymeans, as a work around you can just forward the email to yourself, this way it will show as a new message at the top of your inbox and then you could keep that copy an delete the older one.

 

Hope this helps

 

Paul

 

 

Paul

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nino Dagostino
Sent: 14 May 2018 12:24
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Email inbox

 

Hi:

 

I was wondering if anybody new how to move the posission of an email that is quite far down on the lists of emails in the inbox.

 

Is there a way to move that message further up in the list of emails?

 

I hope I explained it properly.

 

 


moderated Re: Using JAWS to Resume a Download from BARD

Dan Longmore
 

I don’t believe that BARD, except perhaps BARD express, will allow you to pause and resume.  You need to re start the download.

Dan

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Miller
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 12:00 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Using JAWS to Resume a Download from BARD

 

Dear Listers:

 

When a download I am trying to make from the BARD web site is interrupted, I try to get it to resume by finding the Resume button and using a left mouse click.  But instead of picking up where the download left off, it starts it all over again.  Is there a way using JAWS that you can resume an interrupted download where the download will resume from where it left off?

 

 

 

Rick Miller

 


moderated Re: Email inbox

paul lemm
 

Hi,

 

I’m not sure that’s possible since most  email clients sort emails in a specific order (usually by date received), however, although this isn’t a perfect solution by anymeans, as a work around you can just forward the email to yourself, this way it will show as a new message at the top of your inbox and then you could keep that copy an delete the older one.

 

Hope this helps

 

Paul

 

 

Paul

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nino Dagostino
Sent: 14 May 2018 12:24
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Email inbox

 

Hi:

 

I was wondering if anybody new how to move the posission of an email that is quite far down on the lists of emails in the inbox.

 

Is there a way to move that message further up in the list of emails?

 

I hope I explained it properly.

 

 


moderated Re: Wire shark

Bissett, Tom <tom.bissett@...>
 

Hi Nino,  I haven’t used wire shark for quite a few years.  What I did find is that the information was displayed in two windows.  You would locate an information line with the pc cursor and then you would have to use the jaws cursor to read the bottom pain that held all the related information.  Not very practical.  I found by exporting the information it was very readable only there was so much information it again was not very practical.

Its colour scheme was all grey and you had to do custom colours for everything including menus.  It can be used in a pinch but really not very useful on an ongoing basis.

I don’t know whether it has changed much since I had to use it.  I don’t know of any other tools like that.

Regards

Tom Bisset

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nino Dagostino
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 9:08 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Wire shark

 

Good morming”

 

Happy mothers day to all those moms.

 

I was wondering if anybody new if Jaws works with wireshark, if not what could be used in its place.

 

Thank you.

 

 


moderated Re: Email inbox

david
 

Hello;

if your using outlook, the answer is no. you can move messages to another folder, you can't move messages up/down within a mail box.

 

 

       Statistics are like a bikini.  What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of george b
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 7:34 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Email inbox

 

Whooo!!!

 

With all the email clients out there it would be helpful if you told us what email you are using

 

thanks

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nino Dagostino
Sent: May 14, 2018 4:24
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Email inbox

 

Hi:

 

I was wondering if anybody new how to move the posission of an email that is quite far down on the lists of emails in the inbox.

 

Is there a way to move that message further up in the list of emails?

 

I hope I explained it properly.

 

 


moderated Sorry about that I wasn't thinging

Nino Dagostino
 

I am using Outlook 2016

 

Thank you

 

 


moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

R&J
 

If you are trying to find the numeric day of the week for any date, there are Excel functions that will do this for you.

Key the following into a cell excluding the square brakets [] [=WEEKDAY(DATE(2018,5,14))] or if you have a properly formatted date in a cell, let's say "A1", then key [=Weekday(A1)].

The result will be a numeral from 1 to 7, where 1=Sunday and 7=Saturday.  This is not what most folk desire, so if you would like the week to start on Monday=1 and end on Sunday=7, key the following formula
[=Mod(WEEKDAY(DATE(2018,5,14))+1,7)] or
[=Mod(Weekday(A1)+1,7)].

By adding 1 and using the MOD function with a devisor of 7, the MOD function results in the remainder of the first argument divided by the second argument (7).







moderated Re: Email inbox

george b <gbmagoo@...>
 

Whooo!!!

 

With all the email clients out there it would be helpful if you told us what email you are using

 

thanks

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nino Dagostino
Sent: May 14, 2018 4:24
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Email inbox

 

Hi:

 

I was wondering if anybody new how to move the posission of an email that is quite far down on the lists of emails in the inbox.

 

Is there a way to move that message further up in the list of emails?

 

I hope I explained it properly.

 

 


moderated Email inbox

Nino Dagostino
 

Hi:

 

I was wondering if anybody new how to move the posission of an email that is quite far down on the lists of emails in the inbox.

 

Is there a way to move that message further up in the list of emails?

 

I hope I explained it properly.

 

 


moderated Casper

Nino Dagostino
 

Hi:

 

Will the older versions of Casper work in windows10?

 

Thanks

 

 


moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

inamuddin khan
 

Dear,  the total is right but you forgot to mention number 18 which is the calculation of January, March, May, July, August and October.

Now divide the total into 7 and count the remainder that is 5.

Sunday 0, Monday 1, Tuesday 2, Wednessday 3, Thursday 4 and Friday 5.

November 23 2018 will be Friday.

There is no number 7 because we count Sunday as 0 and there are 7 days in a week!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dale Alton
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 7:33 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

I must be some thing wrong.  Take November 23, 2018.

The formula I come up with is:  17+4+6+23=68, 68/7=9.7.  If Sunday is 0 and Monday is 1 where is 7?

 

Denver Dale

 

-----Original Message-----

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris Chaffin

Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 6:00 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

Hello Mario,

 

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than the last 2 digits of the year.  So since that was 18, you would use the number 17.  So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then you would use 19.  Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

 

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31 days, 2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29 days.

Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are looking for.  For example, if your date is in May, then you would do this for January through April.  If your date is in October, then you would do this for January through September.

And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are looking for.  For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then you would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

 

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3.  Step 3 was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

 

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation.  The important part of the calculation is the remainder.  In the example given, the remainder was 2, so that is what determined the day of the week.

For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1 then Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

 

Hope this has been helpful.

 

Chris

 

 

> On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@...> wrote:

>

> I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone

> clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's

> done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,

> why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an

> odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

>

> -------- Original Message --------

> From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@...]

> Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST

> To: main@jfw.groups.io

> Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

>

> Clever and ingenious.

>

> Dave

> Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

>

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: inamuddin khan

> To: main@jfw.groups.io

> Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26

> Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

>

>

> Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of

> calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

>

> Let me tell you how you can do it!

>

> Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

>

> 1.

>

> Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

>

> 2.

>

> Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there  are 4 leap years.

>

> 3.

>

> Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have

> 30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

>

> 4.

>

> From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18

> days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from December.

>

> 5.

>

> Now final calculation is:

>

> 17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

>

> 6.

>

> Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

>

> So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

>

> With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

>

> Charlsdarwin1

>

>

>

>

>

> Sent from Mail for Windows 10

>

>

>

> From: Sieghard Weitzel

> Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM

> To: main@jfw.groups.io

> Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

>

>

>

> Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type

> the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to

> format the cell and select the date format, then from the available

> options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the

> second from the top).

>

> If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,

> it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas

> day this year is on a Tuesday.

>

> Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today

> (May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the

> larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2

> and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of

> days from May 11 until December 25.

>

>

>

> the day

>

>

>

> From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom

> Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM

> To: main@jfw.groups.io

> Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

>

>

>

> Hi,

>

> Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week  from an input date.

>

> In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with

> the formula will display the week day.

>

>

>

> =TEXT(A4,"dddd")

>

>

>

> Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change

> the formula a little.  This formula  works on 3 December 1988 and not

> December 12 format.  But then it may not need to be altered at all.

> You’ll just need to experiment.

>

>

>

> HTH

>

> Tom

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin

> Minor

> Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM

> To: main@jfw.groups.io

> Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

>

>

>

> Hi.

>

>

>

> I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for

> Excel.  I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t

> contain all the formulas that I’m looking for.  Essentially, I’d like a

> kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they

> work.  As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day

> of the week a date will be.  Also, I’d like to know how many days are

> between dates.  I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it

> doesn’t list all the formulas.

>

>

>

> Thanks for any help.  Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for.  I

> know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use

> it to its fullest potential.

>

>

>

> Thanks for any info.

>

>

>

> Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

>

> Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

 

 

 

 

 

 


moderated Re: Using JAWS to Resume a Download from BARD

Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

No, there isn’t. Resuming a download where you left off is usually a feature of ftp, not an http download.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rick Miller
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 9:00 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Using JAWS to Resume a Download from BARD

 

Dear Listers:

 

When a download I am trying to make from the BARD web site is interrupted, I try to get it to resume by finding the Resume button and using a left mouse click.  But instead of picking up where the download left off, it starts it all over again.  Is there a way using JAWS that you can resume an interrupted download where the download will resume from where it left off?

 

 

 

Rick Miller

 


moderated Using JAWS to Resume a Download from BARD

Rick Miller
 

Dear Listers:

 

When a download I am trying to make from the BARD web site is interrupted, I try to get it to resume by finding the Resume button and using a left mouse click.  But instead of picking up where the download left off, it starts it all over again.  Is there a way using JAWS that you can resume an interrupted download where the download will resume from where it left off?

 

 

 

Rick Miller

 


moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Dave...
 

remainder, not decimal, Dale. Use even division and note the remainder.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dale Alton" <blinkydale@comcast.net>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 19:33
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


I must be some thing wrong. Take November 23, 2018.
The formula I come up with is: 17+4+6+23=68, 68/7=9.7. If Sunday is 0 and
Monday is 1 where is 7?

Denver Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Chaffin
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 6:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Hello Mario,

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than the
last 2 digits of the year. So since that was 18, you would use the number
17. So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then you would use
19. Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31 days,
2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29 days.
Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are looking
for. For example, if your date is in May, then you would do this for
January through April. If your date is in October, then you would do this
for January through September.
And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then you
would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3. Step 3
was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation. The important part of the
calculation is the remainder. In the example given, the remainder was 2, so
that is what determined the day of the week.
For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1 then
Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

Hope this has been helpful.

Chris


On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone
clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's
done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,
why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an
odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Clever and ingenious.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: inamuddin khan
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of
calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

Let me tell you how you can do it!

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

1.

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

2.

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have
30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

4.

From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18
days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from
December.

5.

Now final calculation is:

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

6.

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type
the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to
format the cell and select the date format, then from the available
options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the
second from the top).

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,
it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas
day this year is on a Tuesday.

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today
(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the
larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2
and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of
days from May 11 until December 25.



the day



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi,

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week from an input
date.

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with
the formula will display the week day.



=TEXT(A4,"dddd")



Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change
the formula a little. This formula works on 3 December 1988 and not
December 12 format. But then it may not need to be altered at all.
You’ll just need to experiment.



HTH

Tom











From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin
Minor
Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi.



I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for
Excel. I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t
contain all the formulas that I’m looking for. Essentially, I’d like a
kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they
work. As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day
of the week a date will be. Also, I’d like to know how many days are
between dates. I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it
doesn’t list all the formulas.



Thanks for any help. Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for. I
know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use
it to its fullest potential.



Thanks for any info.



Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY









moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Dave...
 

You're not using remainder division. Don't rely on fractions in your result.
Use even division and count the remainder.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@hotmail.com>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 17:46
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


date is 7/8/2020
2020 - 1 = 2019. so start with 19.
4 leap years within those 19 years. so add a 4.
starting from January 2020:
January, March and May have 31 days. so add a 3.
April and June have 30 days. so add a 2.
add the 8 days of July.
total is 36 divided by 7 (days in a week?) = 5.142 = 5.1.
so 7/8/2020 is a Monday. but it's not. where did I go wrong, or is
something missing?


-------- Original Message --------
From: Chris Chaffin [mailto:chaffin102468@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 8:00 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Hello Mario,

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than
the last 2 digits of the year. So since that was 18, you would use the
number 17. So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then
you would use 19. Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31
days, 2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29
days.
Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is in May, then you would do
this for January through April. If your date is in October, then you
would do this for January through September.
And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then
you would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3. Step
3 was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation. The important part of the
calculation is the remainder. In the example given, the remainder was
2, so that is what determined the day of the week.
For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1
then Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

Hope this has been helpful.

Chris


On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone
clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's
done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,
why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an
odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Clever and ingenious.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: inamuddin khan
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of
calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

Let me tell you how you can do it!

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

1.

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

2.

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have
30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

4.

From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18
days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from December.

5.

Now final calculation is:

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

6.

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type
the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to
format the cell and select the date format, then from the available
options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the
second from the top).

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,
it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas
day this year is on a Tuesday.

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today
(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the
larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2
and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of
days from May 11 until December 25.



the day



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi,

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week from an input date.

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with
the formula will display the week day.



=TEXT(A4,"dddd")



Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change
the formula a little. This formula works on 3 December 1988 and not
December 12 format. But then it may not need to be altered at all.
You’ll just need to experiment.



HTH

Tom











From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin
Minor
Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi.



I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for
Excel. I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t
contain all the formulas that I’m looking for. Essentially, I’d like a
kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they
work. As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day
of the week a date will be. Also, I’d like to know how many days are
between dates. I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it
doesn’t list all the formulas.



Thanks for any help. Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for. I
know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use
it to its fullest potential.



Thanks for any info.



Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY












.


moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Dale Alton <blinkydale@...>
 

I must be some thing wrong. Take November 23, 2018.
The formula I come up with is: 17+4+6+23=68, 68/7=9.7. If Sunday is 0 and Monday is 1 where is 7?

Denver Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris Chaffin
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 6:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Hello Mario,

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than the last 2 digits of the year. So since that was 18, you would use the number 17. So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then you would use 19. Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31 days, 2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29 days.
Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are looking for. For example, if your date is in May, then you would do this for January through April. If your date is in October, then you would do this for January through September.
And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are looking for. For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then you would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3. Step 3 was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation. The important part of the calculation is the remainder. In the example given, the remainder was 2, so that is what determined the day of the week.
For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1 then Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

Hope this has been helpful.

Chris


On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone
clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's
done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,
why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an
odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Clever and ingenious.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: inamuddin khan
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of
calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

Let me tell you how you can do it!

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

1.

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

2.

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have
30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

4.

From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18
days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from December.

5.

Now final calculation is:

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

6.

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type
the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to
format the cell and select the date format, then from the available
options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the
second from the top).

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,
it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas
day this year is on a Tuesday.

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today
(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the
larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2
and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of
days from May 11 until December 25.



the day



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi,

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week from an input date.

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with
the formula will display the week day.



=TEXT(A4,"dddd")



Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change
the formula a little. This formula works on 3 December 1988 and not
December 12 format. But then it may not need to be altered at all.
You’ll just need to experiment.



HTH

Tom











From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin
Minor
Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi.



I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for
Excel. I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t
contain all the formulas that I’m looking for. Essentially, I’d like a
kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they
work. As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day
of the week a date will be. Also, I’d like to know how many days are
between dates. I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it
doesn’t list all the formulas.



Thanks for any help. Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for. I
know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use
it to its fullest potential.



Thanks for any info.



Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY









moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

inamuddin khan
 

Yes dear, you misunderstood the calculation.

1.

Take 19 days from year 2001 to year 2019.

2.

Take 4 days because from year 2001 to year 2019, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 days each  from January, March, May that will be 9 days.

4.

Take 2 days each from April and June that will be 4.

5.

Take 1 from February because the year 2020 will be leap year.

6.

Take 8 days from July.

7.

The total will be 45 not 36.

The final calculation will be:

19+4+3+1+3+2+3+2+8=45 divide into 7 iquals 6 remainder 3.

So counting will Sunday 0, Monday 1, Tuesday 2, and Wednessday 3.

So July 8th 2020 will be Wednessday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Mario
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 5:46 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

date is 7/8/2020

2020 - 1 = 2019. so start with 19.

4 leap years within those 19 years. so add a 4.

starting from January 2020:

January, March and May have 31 days. so add a 3.

April and June have 30 days. so add a 2.

add the 8 days of July.

total is 36 divided by 7 (days in a week?) = 5.142 = 5.1.

so 7/8/2020 is a Monday. but it's not. where did I go wrong, or is

something missing?

 

 

-------- Original Message --------

From: Chris Chaffin [mailto:chaffin102468@...]

Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 8:00 PM EST

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

Hello Mario,

 

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than

the last 2 digits of the year.  So since that was 18, you would use the

number 17.  So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then

you would use 19.  Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

 

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31

days, 2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29

days.

Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are

looking for.  For example, if your date is in May, then you would do

this for January through April.  If your date is in October, then you

would do this for January through September.

And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are

looking for.  For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then

you would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

 

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3.  Step

3 was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

 

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation.  The important part of the

calculation is the remainder.  In the example given, the remainder was

2, so that is what determined the day of the week.

For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1

then Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

 

Hope this has been helpful.

 

Chris

 

 

On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@...> wrote:

 

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone

clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's

done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,

why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an

odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

 

-------- Original Message --------

From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@...]

Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

Clever and ingenious.

 

Dave

Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: inamuddin khan

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26

Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

 

Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of

calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

 

Let me tell you how you can do it!

 

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

 

1.

 

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

 

2.

 

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there  are 4 leap years.

 

3.

 

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have

30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

 

4.

 

  From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18

days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from December.

 

5.

 

Now final calculation is:

 

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

 

6.

 

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

 

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

 

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

 

Charlsdarwin1

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

 

From: Sieghard Weitzel

Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

 

 

Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type

the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to

format the cell and select the date format, then from the available

options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the

second from the top).

 

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,

it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas

day this year is on a Tuesday.

 

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today

(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the

larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2

and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of

days from May 11 until December 25.

 

 

 

the day

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom

Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

 

 

Hi,

 

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week  from an input date.

 

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with

the formula will display the week day.

 

 

 

=TEXT(A4,"dddd")

 

 

 

Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change

the formula a little.  This formula  works on 3 December 1988 and not

December 12 format.  But then it may not need to be altered at all.

You’ll just need to experiment.

 

 

 

HTH

 

Tom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin

Minor

Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

 

 

 

Hi.

 

 

 

I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for

Excel.  I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t

contain all the formulas that I’m looking for.  Essentially, I’d like a

kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they

work.  As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day

of the week a date will be.  Also, I’d like to know how many days are

between dates.  I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it

doesn’t list all the formulas.

 

 

 

Thanks for any help.  Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for.  I

know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use

it to its fullest potential.

 

 

 

Thanks for any info.

 

 

 

Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

 

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 


moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Mario
 

correction:

date is 7/8/2020
2020 - 1 = 2019. so start with 19.
5 leap years within those 19 years. so add a 4.
starting from January 2020:
January, March and May have 31 days. so add a 9 (3*3).
April and June have 30 days. so add a 4 (2*2).
February is 29 days. so add a 1.
add the 8 days of July.
total is 46 divided by 7 (days in a week) = 6.5.
so 7/8/2020 is a Wednesday.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Mario [mailto:mrb620@hotmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 8:46 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

date is 7/8/2020
2020 - 1 = 2019. so start with 19.
4 leap years within those 19 years. so add a 4.
starting from January 2020:
January, March and May have 31 days. so add a 3.
April and June have 30 days. so add a 2.
add the 8 days of July.
total is 36 divided by 7 (days in a week?) = 5.142 = 5.1.
so 7/8/2020 is a Monday. but it's not. where did I go wrong, or is
something missing?


-------- Original Message --------
From: Chris Chaffin [mailto:chaffin102468@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 8:00 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Hello Mario,

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than
the last 2 digits of the year. So since that was 18, you would use the
number 17. So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then
you would use 19. Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31
days, 2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29
days.
Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is in May, then you would do
this for January through April. If your date is in October, then you
would do this for January through September.
And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then
you would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3. Step
3 was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation. The important part of the
calculation is the remainder. In the example given, the remainder was
2, so that is what determined the day of the week.
For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1
then Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

Hope this has been helpful.

Chris


On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone
clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's
done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,
why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an
odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Clever and ingenious.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: inamuddin khan
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of
calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

Let me tell you how you can do it!

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

1.

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

2.

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have
30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

4.

From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18
days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from December.

5.

Now final calculation is:

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

6.

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type
the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to
format the cell and select the date format, then from the available
options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the
second from the top).

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,
it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas
day this year is on a Tuesday.

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today
(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the
larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2
and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of
days from May 11 until December 25.



the day



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi,

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week from an input date.

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with
the formula will display the week day.



=TEXT(A4,"dddd")



Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change
the formula a little. This formula works on 3 December 1988 and not
December 12 format. But then it may not need to be altered at all.
You’ll just need to experiment.



HTH

Tom











From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin
Minor
Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi.



I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for
Excel. I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t
contain all the formulas that I’m looking for. Essentially, I’d like a
kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they
work. As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day
of the week a date will be. Also, I’d like to know how many days are
between dates. I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it
doesn’t list all the formulas.



Thanks for any help. Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for. I
know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use
it to its fullest potential.



Thanks for any info.



Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY












.


moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Mario
 

date is 7/8/2020
2020 - 1 = 2019. so start with 19.
4 leap years within those 19 years. so add a 4.
starting from January 2020:
January, March and May have 31 days. so add a 3.
April and June have 30 days. so add a 2.
add the 8 days of July.
total is 36 divided by 7 (days in a week?) = 5.142 = 5.1.
so 7/8/2020 is a Monday. but it's not. where did I go wrong, or is
something missing?

-------- Original Message --------
From: Chris Chaffin [mailto:chaffin102468@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 8:00 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Hello Mario,

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than
the last 2 digits of the year. So since that was 18, you would use the
number 17. So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then
you would use 19. Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31
days, 2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29
days.
Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is in May, then you would do
this for January through April. If your date is in October, then you
would do this for January through September.
And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then
you would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3. Step
3 was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation. The important part of the
calculation is the remainder. In the example given, the remainder was
2, so that is what determined the day of the week.
For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1
then Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

Hope this has been helpful.

Chris


On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone
clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's
done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,
why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an
odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Clever and ingenious.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: inamuddin khan
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of
calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

Let me tell you how you can do it!

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

1.

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

2.

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have
30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

4.

From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18
days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from December.

5.

Now final calculation is:

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

6.

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type
the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to
format the cell and select the date format, then from the available
options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the
second from the top).

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,
it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas
day this year is on a Tuesday.

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today
(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the
larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2
and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of
days from May 11 until December 25.



the day



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi,

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week from an input date.

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with
the formula will display the week day.



=TEXT(A4,"dddd")



Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change
the formula a little. This formula works on 3 December 1988 and not
December 12 format. But then it may not need to be altered at all.
You’ll just need to experiment.



HTH

Tom











From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin
Minor
Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi.



I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for
Excel. I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t
contain all the formulas that I’m looking for. Essentially, I’d like a
kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they
work. As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day
of the week a date will be. Also, I’d like to know how many days are
between dates. I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it
doesn’t list all the formulas.



Thanks for any help. Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for. I
know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use
it to its fullest potential.



Thanks for any info.



Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY












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