Date   
Re: Chrome questions

David Moore
 

Hi all!

I echo Sieghard’s words about Chrome!

The only site that works a little better with IE is:

m.facebook.com

I do not use Firefox, for anything, because Chrome is so much faster.

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Jason White via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:22 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

I use Chrome as my default browser, but still find it occasionally helpful to access certain sites with Firefox.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 5:14 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

Hi Sandra,

 

With the exception of these few issues I described Chrome works beautifully with Jaws and in my opinion is much better than IE and I also prefer it over Firefox.

There really isn't more I can say, you really should just download it and use it, after all it's free and as I said, it's much better to have two or three tools in the browser toolbox instead f just one.

I would say for 90% of the browsing I do Chrome is great and definitely a lot faster when it comes to loading pages and so on that IE ever was.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sandra Streeter
Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:47 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

To prime the pump a bit more—I know that, years ago, there were complaints about Chrome not meshing well with JAWS, and I wondered if most of the bugs have since been ironed out. Please continue to send comments—I’m interested.

 

 

 

Sandra

One can never consent to creep, when one feels an impulse to soar.
(Helen Keller)

 

Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 7:31 PM

Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

I know I'm not David and I am posting this to the list since others might want to hear it too.

Chrome works very well with Jaws for the most part. It is much faster than IE and I prefer it over Firefox for every-day use.

One thing which does not work well with Crhome is to create PDF documents from web pages using the print function and virtual PDF printers such as the "Microsoft Print to PDF" printer which is available in Windows 10 or in Windows 7 I use Nuance Power PDF. If you use one of these to create a PPDF from IE oir Firefox the resulting PDF is accessible and Jaws can read it. If you do the same thing from Chrome the PDF is an image and only accessible by using Convenient OCR.

The other issue I found is that for me on a few websites Chrome does not read some content which IE and Firefox reads. For example, if I log into my Mastercard account and look at my transaction history, Chrome will read the column headings like transaction date, posting date, description and the amount, but it then skips right over the actual transactions which visually are on the screen and which IE and Firefox has no problems reading and which it does so beautrifully using table navigation commands..

Pretty much everything else Chrome does very nicely and, as I said, very quickly and a few websites definitely work much better with Chrome than they do with IE.

I think that currently browsers are like a hammer or a saw for a carpenter, you have a few different ones in your toolbox and while you may have a favourite there are situations where another one is better.

Since IE is on all Windows computers anyways you just have to install Chrome and, if you want, Firefox, try them out and set whichever one you like best as your default and then use the others as needed. They won't interfere with each other so it definitely doesn't hurt to have them available.

If you use Windows 10 you also have Edge on your computer and if you are a Jaws user you will be able to try it out fairly soon, if you also use NVDA you can already use it although I think for most of us Chrome or IE is still much more familiar.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sandra Streeter
Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Chrome questions

 

David, could you email me off-list and describe your experiences with Chrome? I’m on I.E., Win.7,  now, and wonder how far Chrome has come for screen-reader users; every so often, I see the little message about switching, but don’t know enough about the pros/cons. Thanks!

 

Sandra

One can never consent to creep, when one feels an impulse to soar.
(Helen Keller)

 

 

 

How accessible is office 365 mail with latest JAWS?

Jodie Hoger
 

Hi Group,
My organisation is moving to office 365 and I have been told we will start using 365 mail in September. I currently use Outlook 16. Is it the same? From the email I received I am thinking it is quite different.
I would love to hear from anyone knowing about this.
Thanks,
Jodie

Sent from my iPhone

Re: Chrome questions

Jason White
 

I use Chrome as my default browser, but still find it occasionally helpful to access certain sites with Firefox.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 5:14 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

Hi Sandra,

 

With the exception of these few issues I described Chrome works beautifully with Jaws and in my opinion is much better than IE and I also prefer it over Firefox.

There really isn't more I can say, you really should just download it and use it, after all it's free and as I said, it's much better to have two or three tools in the browser toolbox instead f just one.

I would say for 90% of the browsing I do Chrome is great and definitely a lot faster when it comes to loading pages and so on that IE ever was.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sandra Streeter
Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:47 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

To prime the pump a bit more—I know that, years ago, there were complaints about Chrome not meshing well with JAWS, and I wondered if most of the bugs have since been ironed out. Please continue to send comments—I’m interested.

 

 

 

Sandra

One can never consent to creep, when one feels an impulse to soar.
(Helen Keller)

 

Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 7:31 PM

Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

I know I'm not David and I am posting this to the list since others might want to hear it too.

Chrome works very well with Jaws for the most part. It is much faster than IE and I prefer it over Firefox for every-day use.

One thing which does not work well with Crhome is to create PDF documents from web pages using the print function and virtual PDF printers such as the "Microsoft Print to PDF" printer which is available in Windows 10 or in Windows 7 I use Nuance Power PDF. If you use one of these to create a PPDF from IE oir Firefox the resulting PDF is accessible and Jaws can read it. If you do the same thing from Chrome the PDF is an image and only accessible by using Convenient OCR.

The other issue I found is that for me on a few websites Chrome does not read some content which IE and Firefox reads. For example, if I log into my Mastercard account and look at my transaction history, Chrome will read the column headings like transaction date, posting date, description and the amount, but it then skips right over the actual transactions which visually are on the screen and which IE and Firefox has no problems reading and which it does so beautrifully using table navigation commands..

Pretty much everything else Chrome does very nicely and, as I said, very quickly and a few websites definitely work much better with Chrome than they do with IE.

I think that currently browsers are like a hammer or a saw for a carpenter, you have a few different ones in your toolbox and while you may have a favourite there are situations where another one is better.

Since IE is on all Windows computers anyways you just have to install Chrome and, if you want, Firefox, try them out and set whichever one you like best as your default and then use the others as needed. They won't interfere with each other so it definitely doesn't hurt to have them available.

If you use Windows 10 you also have Edge on your computer and if you are a Jaws user you will be able to try it out fairly soon, if you also use NVDA you can already use it although I think for most of us Chrome or IE is still much more familiar.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sandra Streeter
Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Chrome questions

 

David, could you email me off-list and describe your experiences with Chrome? I’m on I.E., Win.7,  now, and wonder how far Chrome has come for screen-reader users; every so often, I see the little message about switching, but don’t know enough about the pros/cons. Thanks!

 

Sandra

One can never consent to creep, when one feels an impulse to soar.
(Helen Keller)

 

 

Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

 

I am and have been using Sage 50 which before it became Sage 50 was Simply Accounting for over 20 years. There are no scripts, but I am able to do pretty much everything, you have to use tab a lot and sometimes the Jaws cursor. I used to do payroll with it as well, but currently use a Payroll service so I don't have to do this any more.

I own a retail business selling outdoor and hunting gear and I use of course the General journal and I also use Suppliers, the Purchases and Payments journals and look at reports all of which can also be exported to Excel (pretty standard).

I print cheques with it and it works fine, but I am not happy with Sage Accounting as a company. I actually stopped using their payroll module because the annual cost for getting the latest update which included the current tax tables was way too expensive. I am in Canada and once I started using Payworks for doing my payroll I just stopped buying updates. I am currently using the 2014 version.

If I had to start from scratch I would most likely invest in the scripts for Quickbooks although it would be nice if their Online solution would be fully accessible.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Greg Nickel
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 7:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

 

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg

 

Re: Chrome questions

 

Hi Sandra,

 

With the exception of these few issues I described Chrome works beautifully with Jaws and in my opinion is much better than IE and I also prefer it over Firefox.

There really isn't more I can say, you really should just download it and use it, after all it's free and as I said, it's much better to have two or three tools in the browser toolbox instead f just one.

I would say for 90% of the browsing I do Chrome is great and definitely a lot faster when it comes to loading pages and so on that IE ever was.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sandra Streeter
Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:47 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

To prime the pump a bit more—I know that, years ago, there were complaints about Chrome not meshing well with JAWS, and I wondered if most of the bugs have since been ironed out. Please continue to send comments—I’m interested.

 

 

 

Sandra

One can never consent to creep, when one feels an impulse to soar.
(Helen Keller)

 

Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 7:31 PM

Subject: Re: Chrome questions

 

I know I'm not David and I am posting this to the list since others might want to hear it too.

Chrome works very well with Jaws for the most part. It is much faster than IE and I prefer it over Firefox for every-day use.

One thing which does not work well with Crhome is to create PDF documents from web pages using the print function and virtual PDF printers such as the "Microsoft Print to PDF" printer which is available in Windows 10 or in Windows 7 I use Nuance Power PDF. If you use one of these to create a PPDF from IE oir Firefox the resulting PDF is accessible and Jaws can read it. If you do the same thing from Chrome the PDF is an image and only accessible by using Convenient OCR.

The other issue I found is that for me on a few websites Chrome does not read some content which IE and Firefox reads. For example, if I log into my Mastercard account and look at my transaction history, Chrome will read the column headings like transaction date, posting date, description and the amount, but it then skips right over the actual transactions which visually are on the screen and which IE and Firefox has no problems reading and which it does so beautrifully using table navigation commands..

Pretty much everything else Chrome does very nicely and, as I said, very quickly and a few websites definitely work much better with Chrome than they do with IE.

I think that currently browsers are like a hammer or a saw for a carpenter, you have a few different ones in your toolbox and while you may have a favourite there are situations where another one is better.

Since IE is on all Windows computers anyways you just have to install Chrome and, if you want, Firefox, try them out and set whichever one you like best as your default and then use the others as needed. They won't interfere with each other so it definitely doesn't hurt to have them available.

If you use Windows 10 you also have Edge on your computer and if you are a Jaws user you will be able to try it out fairly soon, if you also use NVDA you can already use it although I think for most of us Chrome or IE is still much more familiar.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sandra Streeter
Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2017 4:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Chrome questions

 

David, could you email me off-list and describe your experiences with Chrome? I’m on I.E., Win.7,  now, and wonder how far Chrome has come for screen-reader users; every so often, I see the little message about switching, but don’t know enough about the pros/cons. Thanks!

 

Sandra

One can never consent to creep, when one feels an impulse to soar.
(Helen Keller)

 

 

Re: windows 10 issues

Robert Logue
 

You won't like this but I think you should backup and do a clean reinstall.

You can use; reset this PC.

Don't use any registry cleaners like CCleaner.

Just use Windows Defender if you have the latest Windows.

Don't install any other AV till you get your system stabilized.


You can do the reinstall that keeps your files and only removes apps.  This will keep your user files mostly intact.  You may have to reset some folders in your user>apdata.  Fore example Thunderbird store identities there and reinstall TB writes over them. However you may have a backup.


Some web sites, even Google and Bing will say the connection isn't working and offer the repair function.  Sometimes just refreshing the page works.  Sometimes you need to reset your modem.

It seems to happen when the web is very busy.


Bob


On 2017-07-26 4:47 AM, marvin hunkin wrote:

Hi. Using jaws for windows a screen reader from http://www.freedomscientific.com and using windows 10 64 bit pro on a Toshiba satellite pro c-50-a, and a programming student and have a lot of apps, and don't want to have to rebuild all of them again. At least once a day or maybe more then that windows crhashes, or I get file explorer not responding or visual studio not responding, and so then I lose speech, and then windows crashes. So, have got the latest windows updates, latest windows 10 drivers for my Toshiba. Have got c cleaner and have it moniterring and have Avast anti virus free, and now some times on the system tray lose the Avast and c cleaner icon, and then on my internet connection, and with my republic http://www.myrepublic.com.au in Australia says the windows communication is turned off and have to go in and trouble shoot and fix it at least once or twice a day. Don't want to have to do a reset and is there a program, that will save all my compiled and apps desktop, windows universal. And also is there any good accessible windows back up software, free, and does macreiner and eona work with jaws. Any help please. This is frustrating and then have to click on the recovered files in visual studio

2017 community. Any ideas. Thanks.

Just frustrating and then yesterday had to do a windows update trouble shooting, the windows update feature was disabled and did get one update, which was windows defender. Any help.

 

Thanks .

 

Marvin from Australia.


Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

When I worked in Houston, a guy from Telesensory who developed and then sold Optacons came to my office. He had his screen display, which we could attach to my Optacon via master-slave cable. The girls at the office couldn't believe it. They could tell the difference in reading a carbon copy from reading hard copy. They could not keep up with me. For you who do not know, the Optacon displays one character at a time. It takes a year or two to develop speed. I had mine about four years at the time this happened. They said that the characters just flew by, and they were faster than they could keep up with. I could not have kept that job, if I had not had the Optacon. I had to make modifications or corrections, and that was before we had computers. Also, I had to read some information from copy, as well as just about all of my reference materials were in print.

Yesterday, I printed a list for Wal-Mart, realized I'd forgotten eyedrops. I had not saved the list, so checked with Optacon, could tell with my fingers about how far down the list went. I just put it in my good old IBM Correcting Selectric, lined it up where I thought it would go, and I could have typed a period, rolled paper down so many rolls, checked with Optacon, but I was pretty sure, and it came out pretty close to where it should be. The type face was smaller, so that made a difference, but it was lined up all right. I know of no other device that gives us that kind of flexibility.

With the typing period trick, of course, you take the period out and then type or adjust and try that again. I've done so much putting in paper and working with text that is already there, that I'm pretty good at it for someone with no sight at all. The fact that I once had partial sight though, I believe could be an advantage as far as gauging distance concepts.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 2:48 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Hello Angel:

The head of the Environmental health department where I worked at the time, wrote beautifully formed copper plate letters. One day, he walked into my office and asked what I was doing with this machine. I explained what it did. He then wrote some sentences on a sheet of paper and asked me if I could read them back to him. Needless to say, he was taken aback at such technology

Sincerely:

Dave Durber

----- Original Message -----

From: Angel <mailto:angel238@...>
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 8:25 AM
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

That was why I believed I would best be benefited by the Stereo-toner. It must be remembered, by today's generation, that the Opticon, and the Stereo-toner were the only devices existing. Which would enable a totally blind person to read print. Of course, I heard even handwriting could be read by skilled Opticon users. These new fangled reading devices can't even read handwriting.

----- Original Message -----
From: Sieghard Weitzel <mailto:@Sieghard>
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 12:42 AM
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules


That stereo toner thing sounds truly complicated. I was briefly trained on the Optacon at the school for the blind in Marburg, Germany, but I did not have much of a nack for it and found it so slow to be useless. This may of course have to do with the fact that only a few years before then (in 1984) I blew myself up with a home-built pipe bomb and lost 2 fingers on each hand (and of course my sight), all other fingers were seriously injured, saved only because of the skill of one of the best hand surgeons in Germany at that time and were not as fully functional as they ultimately became.



Regards,

Sieghard







From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa Stott
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:42 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



Wow, I’ve never heard of this device!



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



From: Angel <mailto:angel238@...>
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 11:35 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



There was a companion device to the Opticon called the Stereo-toner. It worked on the same principle as did the Opticon. excepting it translated the printed text in to tones. Which would, in combination with other tones, decreasing and increasing in pitch to form an audio picture of the printed letter or number. One would take a series of lessons from the Hadley school for the Blind on cassette tapes. One would practice reading printed material thusly. Then one would go to the school itself for two weeks. To learn to properly use the device itself. I thought the Sterio-toner might be a viable alternative for me to use. As I have very limited use of my right hand. The Opticon cost, then, three thousand dollars. While the Stereo-toner cost one thousand dollars. I am glad, now, I didn't get the device. As it, like most devices which truly benefit us blind people, was discontinued shortly thereafter; and repair parts might not be so easily found. Not to mention, it was less popular than was the Opticon.

----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa Stott <mailto:mstott69@...>

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 9:45 PM

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



I certainly do remember the days of optacons. I tried getting one myself, but by that time, they were no longer making them, and you couldn’t even get parts. That was about 28 years ago. LOL



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



From: Carolyn Arnold <mailto:4carolyna@...>
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 9:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



I agree with you, David, 1,000 percent. On one of my jobs, one of the doctors said that I worked in two languages, because I had Braille notes, took Braille short hand, but used my Optacon a lot more than I did Braille.



On that particular job, a requirement was that you had to make any corrections or modifications to reports. There was a blind guy that worked downstairs in Medical Records, and his wife had to do all of his. I worked up in Surgical Pathology. This was in the 70's, when we had multiple carbons, different colors. So, I had to keep those little slips that you use for the carbons and keep up with the colors. I had to carefully roll the typewriter to check with the Optacon about where to make the change. I could do them or would not have kept the job.



There is an Optacon Users List, sporatic traffic. A guy in Canada is trying to develop an Optacon that is more in line with today's technology.



I, for one, think that technology can be a sort of other god to some. For what the Optacon does, I think its technology is state of the art. The only improvement I could suggest would to be to see if the noise it makes could be reduced.



Best From,



Carolyn







-----Original Message-----

From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Moore

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:54 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



Wow!



I still have my Optacon, and I read mail with it.



I read the computer screen with my Optacon,and it went very well. I had a job where I did just that, The Optacon allowed me to feel everything that was on the screen. Wow, that is so great! The Optacon was one of the best assistive technologies ever, in my apinion. It is sad that most blind people do not know what the Optacon is, but I used it to read all of my math and science textbooks, so I could get a degree in math. I could trace all calculus graphs, charts, feel how the equations were set up, and on and on. I could feel, under my finger, what a sighted person sees. That is still so exciting to me. OCR does not compare to the Optacon for small little things that you want to read like a tag on a package, a piece of mail, or read what is on a computer screen. I really wish that someone could bring it back, or a entire community would bring it back. I would be right there, fighting and doing all I could do to bring it back.



Have a great one, guys!



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10





From: Randy Barnett <mailto:randy@...>

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:15 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules





I too started with a Comadore 64 but I culd still see back then. My first experience with Jaws was v3.7 and have been useing it ever since.

I thought my serial No was old being in the 40,000's. LOL

On 6/9/2017 10:14 AM, Bob Hicks wrote:



Oh my gosh, I still have my Opticon!







Have a great day!







Bob Hicks







From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Turner

Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 10:25 AM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules







I started out with a Commodore 64 using an OPTACON to read the screen in about 1983 or so. Hard to remember back that far







Richard











From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel

Sent: Thursday, June 8, 2017 3:39 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules







I probably have most of you beat, my Jaws serial number is 1056. I first bought Jaws for DOS in 1989, I think it was version 1.1, when Windows 3.1 came out in 19992 I used it alongside DOS.



Jaws for Windows was actually first released in January 1995, it was JFW 1.0 with support for Windows 3.1/3.11 and Windows for Workgroups 3.1.



JFW 2.0 was released in 1996, not sure when, it had support for Windows 95 which was released in August of 1995. Back in those days there usually was not support for a new OS version at the time of release.



I am looking some of this up in a Wikipedia article, for some reason they skip JFW 3.0.



In between, in 1998, 1999 and 2000 we of course had the release of Windows 98, 98SE and Millennium.



Windows XP was first released on August 24, 2001



JFW 4.0 which came out in September 2001 and I am pretty sure it support Windows XP.



JFW 4.5 came out in August of 2002 and it was the first version which had quick nav keys for IE.



JFW 5.0 was October 2003 and then there was a longer gap as JFW 6.0 didn't come out until March 2005, it introduced the ILM licensing scheme.



JFW 7 was released later that same year (2005) and 7.1 is listed with a release date of June 2006.



Windows Vista was released in November of 2006 and I'm pretty sure JFW 8 which was released in November of 2006 had support for it as well as introducing Realspeak Solo voices. From here on it seems to go to the annual release schedule in late October/early November.



Other milestones:



Jaws Tandem was released with Jaws 10 in November 2008



Windows 7 was released in July of 2009 and JFW 11 came out in the fall with support for Windows 7 and it introduced Research It



In 2010 JFW 12 replaced the old configuration manager with the Settings Centre



Jaws 13 in 2011 introduced one of my favourite features, Convenient OCR.



JFW 14 in 2012 came with Windows 8 support and Flexible Web



JFW 15 in 2013 had Windows 8 touch screen support and introduced FS Reader 3.0



JFW 16 in 2014 introduced command search in Settings Centre and Convenient OCR which in V13 only applied to graphics on the screen was expanded to handle entire PDF documents



Windows 10 first was released on July 29, 2015 and an update to Jaws 16 from the previous fall had initial support for it.



JFW 17 in 2015 introduced smart navigation for tables and Liblouis, an open source braille translator



Finally JFW 18 in 2016 (last fall) introduced mouse echo, audio ducking and Settings import/export was reintroduced.







Here is a link to the Wikipedia article:



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader) <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_%28screen_reader%29>







Regards,



Sieghard







From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 2:52 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: training modules







I had an early demo version that was something like 0.76 with a serial in the 3000s.







I should have stock in the company since I have owned every version since DOS, either purchased or through paying for skipped updates.







Tony











From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ronnie Hill

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 4:32 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: training modules







Well I can't remember which year I did stgarted with JAWS Version of 3.3!



I guess it was around 1998



I thought that the first JAWS version was started from 3.2 it amazing to know it started from version 3 but I'm not sure.



Cheers everyone.



Ronnie from London.



----- Original Message -----



From: Bob Hicks <mailto:bob@...>



To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>



Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 8:37 PM



Subject: Re: training modules







Hard to believe I started on JAWS 3.1 isn’t it!







Have a great day!







Bob Hicks







From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carol Smith via Groups.Io

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 3:24 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: training modules







If you open the FS reader, you should be able to access tutorials from there by pressing control+J. There are links to tutorials. If they are not already downloaded and placed in the appropriate place, the program will do this for you. These are in Daisy format and you can use control+P to toggle play and pause.



This is a global key command, so as long as the reader is open, it takes presidence over other programs using that key command. This makes it very handy if you want to practice what you are reading in an open program. This information should be enough to get you started.



Carol



On 6/8/2017 2:46 PM, Bob Hicks wrote:



I downloaded my version of Jaws 18. How do I git the training modules into FS reader? tia







Have a great day!







Bob Hicks






























<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient> Virus-free. www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>

Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Oh my, I have had an Optacon since 1974, one of the very best things I ever had. I can check my checks. When I lived alone, I needed no help with any of my business or bills.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Durber
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 2:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Hello Melissa <mailto:mstott69@...> :

I used to love taking my optacon to my local library and read newspapers, magazines and books from the shelves. It was nice to go along the shelves using the optacon to read the titles of the books, by myself, and not having to depend on someone to read them out for me.

We still have optacons in our house.

Sincerely:

Dave Durber

----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa Stott <mailto:mstott69@...>
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 4:42 AM
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules


Wow, I’ve never heard of this device!



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



From: Angel <mailto:angel238@...>
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 11:35 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



There was a companion device to the Opticon called the Stereo-toner. It worked on the same principle as did the Opticon. excepting it translated the printed text in to tones. Which would, in combination with other tones, decreasing and increasing in pitch to form an audio picture of the printed letter or number. One would take a series of lessons from the Hadley school for the Blind on cassette tapes. One would practice reading printed material thusly. Then one would go to the school itself for two weeks. To learn to properly use the device itself. I thought the Sterio-toner might be a viable alternative for me to use. As I have very limited use of my right hand. The Opticon cost, then, three thousand dollars. While the Stereo-toner cost one thousand dollars. I am glad, now, I didn't get the device. As it, like most devices which truly benefit us blind people, was discontinued shortly thereafter; and repair parts might not be so easily found. Not to mention, it was less popular than was the Opticon.

----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa Stott <mailto:mstott69@...>

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 9:45 PM

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



I certainly do remember the days of optacons. I tried getting one myself, but by that time, they were no longer making them, and you couldn’t even get parts. That was about 28 years ago. LOL



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



From: Carolyn Arnold <mailto:4carolyna@...>
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 9:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



I agree with you, David, 1,000 percent. On one of my jobs, one of the doctors said that I worked in two languages, because I had Braille notes, took Braille short hand, but used my Optacon a lot more than I did Braille.



On that particular job, a requirement was that you had to make any corrections or modifications to reports. There was a blind guy that worked downstairs in Medical Records, and his wife had to do all of his. I worked up in Surgical Pathology. This was in the 70's, when we had multiple carbons, different colors. So, I had to keep those little slips that you use for the carbons and keep up with the colors. I had to carefully roll the typewriter to check with the Optacon about where to make the change. I could do them or would not have kept the job.



There is an Optacon Users List, sporatic traffic. A guy in Canada is trying to develop an Optacon that is more in line with today's technology.



I, for one, think that technology can be a sort of other god to some. For what the Optacon does, I think its technology is state of the art. The only improvement I could suggest would to be to see if the noise it makes could be reduced.



Best From,



Carolyn







-----Original Message-----

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Moore

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:54 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules



Wow!



I still have my Optacon, and I read mail with it.



I read the computer screen with my Optacon,and it went very well. I had a job where I did just that, The Optacon allowed me to feel everything that was on the screen. Wow, that is so great! The Optacon was one of the best assistive technologies ever, in my apinion. It is sad that most blind people do not know what the Optacon is, but I used it to read all of my math and science textbooks, so I could get a degree in math. I could trace all calculus graphs, charts, feel how the equations were set up, and on and on. I could feel, under my finger, what a sighted person sees. That is still so exciting to me. OCR does not compare to the Optacon for small little things that you want to read like a tag on a package, a piece of mail, or read what is on a computer screen. I really wish that someone could bring it back, or a entire community would bring it back. I would be right there, fighting and doing all I could do to bring it back.



Have a great one, guys!



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10





From: Randy Barnett <mailto:randy@...>

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:15 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules





I too started with a Comadore 64 but I culd still see back then. My first experience with Jaws was v3.7 and have been useing it ever since.

I thought my serial No was old being in the 40,000's. LOL

On 6/9/2017 10:14 AM, Bob Hicks wrote:



Oh my gosh, I still have my Opticon!







Have a great day!







Bob Hicks







From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Turner

Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 10:25 AM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules







I started out with a Commodore 64 using an OPTACON to read the screen in about 1983 or so. Hard to remember back that far







Richard











From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel

Sent: Thursday, June 8, 2017 3:39 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules







I probably have most of you beat, my Jaws serial number is 1056. I first bought Jaws for DOS in 1989, I think it was version 1.1, when Windows 3.1 came out in 19992 I used it alongside DOS.



Jaws for Windows was actually first released in January 1995, it was JFW 1.0 with support for Windows 3.1/3.11 and Windows for Workgroups 3.1.



JFW 2.0 was released in 1996, not sure when, it had support for Windows 95 which was released in August of 1995. Back in those days there usually was not support for a new OS version at the time of release.



I am looking some of this up in a Wikipedia article, for some reason they skip JFW 3.0.



In between, in 1998, 1999 and 2000 we of course had the release of Windows 98, 98SE and Millennium.



Windows XP was first released on August 24, 2001



JFW 4.0 which came out in September 2001 and I am pretty sure it support Windows XP.



JFW 4.5 came out in August of 2002 and it was the first version which had quick nav keys for IE.



JFW 5.0 was October 2003 and then there was a longer gap as JFW 6.0 didn't come out until March 2005, it introduced the ILM licensing scheme.



JFW 7 was released later that same year (2005) and 7.1 is listed with a release date of June 2006.



Windows Vista was released in November of 2006 and I'm pretty sure JFW 8 which was released in November of 2006 had support for it as well as introducing Realspeak Solo voices. From here on it seems to go to the annual release schedule in late October/early November.



Other milestones:



Jaws Tandem was released with Jaws 10 in November 2008



Windows 7 was released in July of 2009 and JFW 11 came out in the fall with support for Windows 7 and it introduced Research It



In 2010 JFW 12 replaced the old configuration manager with the Settings Centre



Jaws 13 in 2011 introduced one of my favourite features, Convenient OCR.



JFW 14 in 2012 came with Windows 8 support and Flexible Web



JFW 15 in 2013 had Windows 8 touch screen support and introduced FS Reader 3.0



JFW 16 in 2014 introduced command search in Settings Centre and Convenient OCR which in V13 only applied to graphics on the screen was expanded to handle entire PDF documents



Windows 10 first was released on July 29, 2015 and an update to Jaws 16 from the previous fall had initial support for it.



JFW 17 in 2015 introduced smart navigation for tables and Liblouis, an open source braille translator



Finally JFW 18 in 2016 (last fall) introduced mouse echo, audio ducking and Settings import/export was reintroduced.







Here is a link to the Wikipedia article:



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader) <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_%28screen_reader%29>







Regards,



Sieghard







From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 2:52 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: training modules







I had an early demo version that was something like 0.76 with a serial in the 3000s.







I should have stock in the company since I have owned every version since DOS, either purchased or through paying for skipped updates.







Tony











From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ronnie Hill

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 4:32 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: training modules







Well I can't remember which year I did stgarted with JAWS Version of 3.3!



I guess it was around 1998



I thought that the first JAWS version was started from 3.2 it amazing to know it started from version 3 but I'm not sure.



Cheers everyone.



Ronnie from London.



----- Original Message -----



From: Bob Hicks <mailto:bob@...>



To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>



Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 8:37 PM



Subject: Re: training modules







Hard to believe I started on JAWS 3.1 isn’t it!







Have a great day!







Bob Hicks







From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carol Smith via Groups.Io

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 3:24 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: training modules







If you open the FS reader, you should be able to access tutorials from there by pressing control+J. There are links to tutorials. If they are not already downloaded and placed in the appropriate place, the program will do this for you. These are in Daisy format and you can use control+P to toggle play and pause.



This is a global key command, so as long as the reader is open, it takes presidence over other programs using that key command. This makes it very handy if you want to practice what you are reading in an open program. This information should be enough to get you started.



Carol



On 6/8/2017 2:46 PM, Bob Hicks wrote:



I downloaded my version of Jaws 18. How do I git the training modules into FS reader? tia







Have a great day!







Bob Hicks






























<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient> Virus-free. www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>

Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Dave Durber
 


Hello Angel:
 
The head of the Environmental health department where I worked at the time, wrote beautifully formed copper plate letters. One day, he walked into my office and asked what I was doing with this machine. I explained what it did. He then wrote some sentences on a sheet of paper and asked me if I could read them back to him. Needless to say, he was taken aback at such technology
 
Sincerely:
 
Dave Durber
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Angel
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 8:25 AM
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

That was why I believed I would best be benefited by the Stereo-toner.  It must be remembered, by today's generation, that the Opticon, and the Stereo-toner were the only devices existing.  Which would enable a totally blind person to read print.  Of course, I heard even handwriting could be read by skilled Opticon users.  These new fangled reading devices can't even read handwriting.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 12:42 AM
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

That stereo toner thing sounds truly complicated. I was briefly trained on the Optacon at the school for the blind in Marburg, Germany, but I did not have much of a nack for it and found it so slow to be useless. This may of course have to do with the fact that only a few years before then (in 1984) I blew myself up with a home-built pipe bomb and lost 2 fingers on each hand (and of course my sight), all other fingers were seriously injured, saved only because of the skill of one of the best hand surgeons in Germany at that time  and were not as fully functional as they ultimately became.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa Stott
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:42 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

Wow, I’ve never heard of this device!

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Angel
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 11:35 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

There was a companion device to the Opticon called the Stereo-toner.  It worked on the same principle as did the Opticon.  excepting it translated the printed text in to tones.  Which would, in combination with other tones, decreasing and increasing in pitch to form an audio picture of the printed letter or number.  One would take a series of lessons from the Hadley school for the Blind on cassette tapes.  One would practice reading printed material thusly.  Then one would go to the school itself for two weeks.  To learn to properly use the device itself.  I thought the Sterio-toner might be a viable alternative for me to use.  As I have very limited use of my right hand.  The Opticon cost, then, three thousand dollars.  While the Stereo-toner cost one thousand dollars.  I am glad, now, I didn't get the device.  As it, like most devices which truly benefit us blind people, was discontinued shortly thereafter; and repair parts might not be so easily found.  Not to mention, it was less popular than was the Opticon.  

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 9:45 PM

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

I certainly do remember the days of optacons.  I tried getting one myself, but by that time, they were no longer making them, and you couldn’t even get parts.  That was about 28 years ago.  LOL

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 9:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

I agree with you, David, 1,000 percent. On one of my jobs, one of the doctors said that I worked in two languages, because I had Braille notes, took Braille short hand, but used my Optacon a lot more than I did Braille.

 

On that particular job, a requirement was that you had to make any corrections or modifications to reports. There was a blind guy that worked downstairs in Medical Records, and his wife had to do all of his. I worked up in Surgical Pathology. This was in the 70's, when we had multiple carbons, different colors. So, I had to keep those little slips that you use for the carbons and keep up with the colors. I had to carefully roll the typewriter to check with the Optacon about where to make the change. I could do them or would not have kept the job.

 

There is an Optacon Users List, sporatic traffic. A guy in Canada is trying to develop an Optacon that is more in line with today's technology.

 

I, for one, think that technology can be a sort of other god to some. For what the Optacon does, I think its technology is state of the art. The only improvement I could suggest would to be to see if the noise it makes could be reduced.

 

Best From,

 

Carolyn

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Moore

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:54 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

Wow!

 

I still have my Optacon, and I read mail with it.

 

I read the computer screen with my Optacon,and it went very well. I had a job where I did just that, The Optacon allowed me to feel everything that was on the screen. Wow, that is so great! The Optacon was one of the best assistive technologies ever, in my apinion. It is sad that most blind people do not know what the Optacon is, but I used it to read all of my math and science textbooks, so I could get a degree in math. I could trace all calculus graphs, charts, feel how the equations were set up, and on and on. I could feel, under my finger, what a sighted person sees. That is still so exciting to me. OCR does not compare to the Optacon for small little things that you want to read like a tag on a package, a piece of mail, or read what is on a computer screen. I really wish that someone could bring it back, or a entire community would bring it back. I would be right there, fighting and doing all I could do to bring it back.

 

Have a great one, guys!

 

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>  for Windows 10

 

 

From: Randy Barnett <mailto:randy@...>

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:15 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

 

I too started with a Comadore 64 but I culd still see back then. My first experience with Jaws was v3.7 and have been useing it ever since.

I thought my serial No was old being in the 40,000's. LOL

On 6/9/2017 10:14 AM, Bob Hicks wrote:

 

                Oh my gosh, I still have my Opticon!

 

 

 

                Have a great day!

 

 

 

                Bob Hicks

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Turner

                Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 10:25 AM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

 

 

                I started out with a Commodore 64 using an OPTACON to read the screen in about 1983 or so.  Hard to remember back that far

 

 

 

                Richard

 

 

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel

                Sent: Thursday, June 8, 2017 3:39 PM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

 

 

                I probably have most of you beat, my Jaws serial number is 1056. I first bought Jaws for DOS in 1989, I think it was version 1.1, when Windows 3.1 came out in 19992 I used it alongside DOS.

 

                Jaws for Windows was actually first released in January 1995, it was JFW 1.0 with support for Windows 3.1/3.11 and Windows for Workgroups 3.1.

 

                JFW 2.0 was released in 1996, not sure when, it had support for Windows 95 which was released in August of 1995. Back in those days there usually was not support for a new OS version at the time of release.

 

                I am looking some of this up in a Wikipedia article, for some reason they skip JFW 3.0.

 

                In between, in 1998, 1999 and 2000 we of course had the release of Windows 98, 98SE and Millennium.

 

                Windows XP was first released on August 24, 2001

 

                JFW 4.0 which came out in September 2001 and I am pretty sure it support Windows XP.

 

                JFW 4.5 came out in August of 2002 and it was the first version which had quick nav keys for IE.

 

                JFW 5.0 was October 2003 and then there was a longer gap as JFW 6.0 didn't come out until March 2005, it introduced the ILM licensing scheme.

 

                JFW 7 was released later that same year (2005) and 7.1 is listed with a release date of June 2006.

 

                Windows Vista was released in November of 2006 and I'm pretty sure JFW 8 which was released in November of 2006 had support for it as well as introducing Realspeak Solo voices. From here on it seems to go to the annual release schedule in late October/early November.

 

                Other milestones:

 

                Jaws Tandem was released with Jaws 10 in November 2008

 

                Windows 7 was released in July of 2009 and JFW 11 came out in the fall with support for Windows 7 and it introduced Research It

 

                In 2010 JFW 12 replaced the old configuration manager with the Settings Centre

 

                Jaws 13 in 2011 introduced one of my favourite features, Convenient OCR.

 

                JFW 14 in 2012 came with Windows 8 support and Flexible Web

 

                JFW 15 in 2013 had Windows 8 touch screen support and introduced FS Reader 3.0

 

                JFW 16 in 2014 introduced command search in Settings Centre and Convenient OCR which in V13 only applied to graphics on the screen was expanded to handle entire PDF documents

 

                Windows 10 first was released on July 29, 2015 and an update to Jaws 16 from the previous fall had initial support for it.

 

                JFW 17 in 2015 introduced smart navigation for tables and Liblouis, an open source braille translator

 

                Finally JFW 18 in 2016 (last fall) introduced mouse echo, audio ducking and Settings import/export was reintroduced.

 

 

 

                Here is a link to the Wikipedia article:

 

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader) <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_%28screen_reader%29>

 

 

 

                Regards,

 

                Sieghard

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony

                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 2:52 PM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: Re: training modules

 

 

 

                I had an early demo version that was something like 0.76 with a serial in the 3000s.

 

 

 

                I should have stock in the company since I have owned every version since DOS, either purchased or through paying for skipped updates.

 

 

 

                Tony

 

 

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ronnie Hill

                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 4:32 PM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: Re: training modules

 

 

 

                Well I can't remember which year I did stgarted with JAWS Version of 3.3!

 

                I guess it was around 1998

 

                I thought that the first JAWS version was  started from 3.2 it amazing to know it started from version 3 but I'm not sure.

 

                Cheers everyone.

 

                Ronnie from London.

 

                                ----- Original Message -----

 

                                From: Bob Hicks <mailto:bob@...>

 

                                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

 

                                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 8:37 PM

 

                                Subject: Re: training modules

 

                               

 

                                Hard to believe I started on JAWS 3.1 isn’t it!

 

                               

 

                                Have a great day!

 

                               

 

                                Bob Hicks

 

                               

 

                                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carol Smith via Groups.Io

                                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 3:24 PM

                                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                                Subject: Re: training modules

 

                               

 

                                If you open the FS reader, you should be able to access tutorials from there by pressing control+J.  There are links to tutorials.  If they are not already downloaded and placed in the appropriate place, the program will do this for you.  These are in Daisy format and you can use control+P to toggle play and pause.

                               

                                This is a global key command, so as long as the reader is open, it takes presidence over other programs using that key command.  This makes it very handy if you want to practice what you are reading in an open program.  This information should be enough to get you started.

                               

                                Carol

 

                                On 6/8/2017 2:46 PM, Bob Hicks wrote:

 

                                                I downloaded my version of Jaws 18.  How do I git the training modules into FS reader?  tia

 

                               

 

                                                Have a great day!

 

                               

 

                                                Bob Hicks

 

                               

 

                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Dave Durber
 


Hello Melissa:
 
I used to love taking my optacon to my local library and read newspapers, magazines and books from the shelves. It was nice to go along the shelves using the optacon to read the titles of the books, by myself, and not having to depend on someone to read them out for me.
 
We still have optacons in our house.
 
Sincerely:
 
Dave Durber
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 4:42 AM
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Wow, I’ve never heard of this device!

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Angel
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 11:35 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

There was a companion device to the Opticon called the Stereo-toner.  It worked on the same principle as did the Opticon.  excepting it translated the printed text in to tones.  Which would, in combination with other tones, decreasing and increasing in pitch to form an audio picture of the printed letter or number.  One would take a series of lessons from the Hadley school for the Blind on cassette tapes.  One would practice reading printed material thusly.  Then one would go to the school itself for two weeks.  To learn to properly use the device itself.  I thought the Sterio-toner might be a viable alternative for me to use.  As I have very limited use of my right hand.  The Opticon cost, then, three thousand dollars.  While the Stereo-toner cost one thousand dollars.  I am glad, now, I didn't get the device.  As it, like most devices which truly benefit us blind people, was discontinued shortly thereafter; and repair parts might not be so easily found.  Not to mention, it was less popular than was the Opticon.  

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 9:45 PM

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

I certainly do remember the days of optacons.  I tried getting one myself, but by that time, they were no longer making them, and you couldn’t even get parts.  That was about 28 years ago.  LOL

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 9:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

I agree with you, David, 1,000 percent. On one of my jobs, one of the doctors said that I worked in two languages, because I had Braille notes, took Braille short hand, but used my Optacon a lot more than I did Braille.

 

On that particular job, a requirement was that you had to make any corrections or modifications to reports. There was a blind guy that worked downstairs in Medical Records, and his wife had to do all of his. I worked up in Surgical Pathology. This was in the 70's, when we had multiple carbons, different colors. So, I had to keep those little slips that you use for the carbons and keep up with the colors. I had to carefully roll the typewriter to check with the Optacon about where to make the change. I could do them or would not have kept the job.

 

There is an Optacon Users List, sporatic traffic. A guy in Canada is trying to develop an Optacon that is more in line with today's technology.

 

I, for one, think that technology can be a sort of other god to some. For what the Optacon does, I think its technology is state of the art. The only improvement I could suggest would to be to see if the noise it makes could be reduced.

 

Best From,

 

Carolyn

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Moore

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:54 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

Wow!

 

I still have my Optacon, and I read mail with it.

 

I read the computer screen with my Optacon,and it went very well. I had a job where I did just that, The Optacon allowed me to feel everything that was on the screen. Wow, that is so great! The Optacon was one of the best assistive technologies ever, in my apinion. It is sad that most blind people do not know what the Optacon is, but I used it to read all of my math and science textbooks, so I could get a degree in math. I could trace all calculus graphs, charts, feel how the equations were set up, and on and on. I could feel, under my finger, what a sighted person sees. That is still so exciting to me. OCR does not compare to the Optacon for small little things that you want to read like a tag on a package, a piece of mail, or read what is on a computer screen. I really wish that someone could bring it back, or a entire community would bring it back. I would be right there, fighting and doing all I could do to bring it back.

 

Have a great one, guys!

 

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>  for Windows 10

 

 

From: Randy Barnett <mailto:randy@...>

Sent: Friday, June 9, 2017 8:15 PM

To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

 

I too started with a Comadore 64 but I culd still see back then. My first experience with Jaws was v3.7 and have been useing it ever since.

I thought my serial No was old being in the 40,000's. LOL

On 6/9/2017 10:14 AM, Bob Hicks wrote:

 

                Oh my gosh, I still have my Opticon!

 

 

 

                Have a great day!

 

 

 

                Bob Hicks

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Turner

                Sent: Friday, June 09, 2017 10:25 AM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

 

 

                I started out with a Commodore 64 using an OPTACON to read the screen in about 1983 or so.  Hard to remember back that far

 

 

 

                Richard

 

 

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel

                Sent: Thursday, June 8, 2017 3:39 PM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

 

 

 

                I probably have most of you beat, my Jaws serial number is 1056. I first bought Jaws for DOS in 1989, I think it was version 1.1, when Windows 3.1 came out in 19992 I used it alongside DOS.

 

                Jaws for Windows was actually first released in January 1995, it was JFW 1.0 with support for Windows 3.1/3.11 and Windows for Workgroups 3.1.

 

                JFW 2.0 was released in 1996, not sure when, it had support for Windows 95 which was released in August of 1995. Back in those days there usually was not support for a new OS version at the time of release.

 

                I am looking some of this up in a Wikipedia article, for some reason they skip JFW 3.0.

 

                In between, in 1998, 1999 and 2000 we of course had the release of Windows 98, 98SE and Millennium.

 

                Windows XP was first released on August 24, 2001

 

                JFW 4.0 which came out in September 2001 and I am pretty sure it support Windows XP.

 

                JFW 4.5 came out in August of 2002 and it was the first version which had quick nav keys for IE.

 

                JFW 5.0 was October 2003 and then there was a longer gap as JFW 6.0 didn't come out until March 2005, it introduced the ILM licensing scheme.

 

                JFW 7 was released later that same year (2005) and 7.1 is listed with a release date of June 2006.

 

                Windows Vista was released in November of 2006 and I'm pretty sure JFW 8 which was released in November of 2006 had support for it as well as introducing Realspeak Solo voices. From here on it seems to go to the annual release schedule in late October/early November.

 

                Other milestones:

 

                Jaws Tandem was released with Jaws 10 in November 2008

 

                Windows 7 was released in July of 2009 and JFW 11 came out in the fall with support for Windows 7 and it introduced Research It

 

                In 2010 JFW 12 replaced the old configuration manager with the Settings Centre

 

                Jaws 13 in 2011 introduced one of my favourite features, Convenient OCR.

 

                JFW 14 in 2012 came with Windows 8 support and Flexible Web

 

                JFW 15 in 2013 had Windows 8 touch screen support and introduced FS Reader 3.0

 

                JFW 16 in 2014 introduced command search in Settings Centre and Convenient OCR which in V13 only applied to graphics on the screen was expanded to handle entire PDF documents

 

                Windows 10 first was released on July 29, 2015 and an update to Jaws 16 from the previous fall had initial support for it.

 

                JFW 17 in 2015 introduced smart navigation for tables and Liblouis, an open source braille translator

 

                Finally JFW 18 in 2016 (last fall) introduced mouse echo, audio ducking and Settings import/export was reintroduced.

 

 

 

                Here is a link to the Wikipedia article:

 

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader) <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_%28screen_reader%29>

 

 

 

                Regards,

 

                Sieghard

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony

                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 2:52 PM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: Re: training modules

 

 

 

                I had an early demo version that was something like 0.76 with a serial in the 3000s.

 

 

 

                I should have stock in the company since I have owned every version since DOS, either purchased or through paying for skipped updates.

 

 

 

                Tony

 

 

 

 

 

                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ronnie Hill

                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 4:32 PM

                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                Subject: Re: training modules

 

 

 

                Well I can't remember which year I did stgarted with JAWS Version of 3.3!

 

                I guess it was around 1998

 

                I thought that the first JAWS version was  started from 3.2 it amazing to know it started from version 3 but I'm not sure.

 

                Cheers everyone.

 

                Ronnie from London.

 

                                ----- Original Message -----

 

                                From: Bob Hicks <mailto:bob@...>

 

                                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

 

                                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 8:37 PM

 

                                Subject: Re: training modules

 

                               

 

                                Hard to believe I started on JAWS 3.1 isn’t it!

 

                               

 

                                Have a great day!

 

                               

 

                                Bob Hicks

 

                               

 

                                From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>  [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carol Smith via Groups.Io

                                Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 3:24 PM

                                To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

                                Subject: Re: training modules

 

                               

 

                                If you open the FS reader, you should be able to access tutorials from there by pressing control+J.  There are links to tutorials.  If they are not already downloaded and placed in the appropriate place, the program will do this for you.  These are in Daisy format and you can use control+P to toggle play and pause.

                               

                                This is a global key command, so as long as the reader is open, it takes presidence over other programs using that key command.  This makes it very handy if you want to practice what you are reading in an open program.  This information should be enough to get you started.

                               

                                Carol

 

                                On 6/8/2017 2:46 PM, Bob Hicks wrote:

 

                                                I downloaded my version of Jaws 18.  How do I git the training modules into FS reader?  tia

 

                               

 

                                                Have a great day!

 

                               

 

                                                Bob Hicks

 

                               

 

                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Re: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

Dave Durber
 

Hello Sieghard:
 
My serieal number is a few numbers later than yours.
 
Sincerely:
 
Dave Durber
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 11:38 PM
Subject: A history of Jaws and Windows, was: training modules

I probably have most of you beat, my Jaws serial number is 1056. I first bought Jaws for DOS in 1989, I think it was version 1.1, when Windows 3.1 came out in 19992 I used it alongside DOS.

Jaws for Windows was actually first released in January 1995, it was JFW 1.0 with support for Windows 3.1/3.11 and Windows for Workgroups 3.1.

JFW 2.0 was released in 1996, not sure when, it had support for Windows 95 which was released in August of 1995. Back in those days there usually was not support for a new OS version at the time of release.

I am looking some of this up in a Wikipedia article, for some reason they skip JFW 3.0.

In between, in 1998, 1999 and 2000 we of course had the release of Windows 98, 98SE and Millennium.

Windows XP was first released on August 24, 2001

JFW 4.0 which came out in September 2001 and I am pretty sure it support Windows XP.

JFW 4.5 came out in August of 2002 and it was the first version which had quick nav keys for IE.

JFW 5.0 was October 2003 and then there was a longer gap as JFW 6.0 didn't come out until March 2005, it introduced the ILM licensing scheme.

JFW 7 was released later that same year (2005) and 7.1 is listed with a release date of June 2006.

Windows Vista was released in November of 2006 and I'm pretty sure JFW 8 which was released in November of 2006 had support for it as well as introducing Realspeak Solo voices. From here on it seems to go to the annual release schedule in late October/early November.

Other milestones:

Jaws Tandem was released with Jaws 10 in November 2008

Windows 7 was released in July of 2009 and JFW 11 came out in the fall with support for Windows 7 and it introduced Research It

In 2010 JFW 12 replaced the old configuration manager with the Settings Centre

Jaws 13 in 2011 introduced one of my favourite features, Convenient OCR.

JFW 14 in 2012 came with Windows 8 support and Flexible Web

JFW 15 in 2013 had Windows 8 touch screen support and introduced FS Reader 3.0

JFW 16 in 2014 introduced command search in Settings Centre and Convenient OCR which in V13 only applied to graphics on the screen was expanded to handle entire PDF documents

Windows 10 first was released on July 29, 2015 and an update to Jaws 16 from the previous fall had initial support for it.

JFW 17 in 2015 introduced smart navigation for tables and Liblouis, an open source braille translator

Finally JFW 18 in 2016 (last fall) introduced mouse echo, audio ducking and Settings import/export was reintroduced.

Here is a link to the Wikipedia article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader)

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 2:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: training modules

 

I had an early demo version that was something like 0.76 with a serial in the 3000s.

 

I should have stock in the company since I have owned every version since DOS, either purchased or through paying for skipped updates.

 

Tony

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ronnie Hill
Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 4:32 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: training modules

 

Well I can't remember which year I did stgarted with JAWS Version of 3.3!

I guess it was around 1998

I thought that the first JAWS version was  started from 3.2 it amazing to know it started from version 3 but I'm not sure.

Cheers everyone.

Ronnie from London.

----- Original Message -----

From: Bob Hicks

Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 8:37 PM

Subject: Re: training modules

 

Hard to believe I started on JAWS 3.1 isn’t it!

 

Have a great day!

 

Bob Hicks

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carol Smith via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2017 3:24 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: training modules

 

If you open the FS reader, you should be able to access tutorials from there by pressing control+J.  There are links to tutorials.  If they are not already downloaded and placed in the appropriate place, the program will do this for you.  These are in Daisy format and you can use control+P to toggle play and pause. 

This is a global key command, so as long as the reader is open, it takes presidence over other programs using that key command.  This makes it very handy if you want to practice what you are reading in an open program.  This information should be enough to get you started. 

Carol

On 6/8/2017 2:46 PM, Bob Hicks wrote:

I downloaded my version of Jaws 18.  How do I git the training modules into FS reader?  tia

 

Have a great day!

 

Bob Hicks

 

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Randy Barnett <randy@...>
 

Did you ever try Cash manager? It is aimed at the European market and has VAT and all that.

On 7/26/2017 8:35 AM, Kerry Fielding wrote:

Hi Greg.


I can't say as I've ever found one that works with JAWS very well but Quickbooks is definitely accessible and works on your iDevice.  I'm self-employed and use their quickbooks self employed iPhone app.  The desktop site is ok but I don't find it half asaccessible.  I've posted the link to the UK quickbooks site but if you need a different country such as the US for example, it is available.


https://www.quickbooks.co.uk/accounting-software/features/payroll-software/


Kerry


On 26/07/2017 15:57, Greg Nickel wrote:

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg





Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Randy Barnett <randy@...>
 

Arent they the ones who rated Narrator as the best screen reader  Putting NVDA second and saying Jaws was the worst screen reader ever?
I wouldnt go by there suggestion...

On 7/26/2017 8:31 AM, HH. Smith Jr. wrote:

Greg,

 

My Blind spot has made QuickBooks the app of choice.

MyBlindSpot.com

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Greg Nickel
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 10:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

 

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg

 


Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Randy Barnett <randy@...>
 

Cash Manager by Aclaim software. I am not sure about payroll function though. You can download a demo version from there website. It is very jaws friendly.

On 7/26/2017 7:57 AM, Greg Nickel wrote:

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg




Re: windows 10 issues

Randy Barnett <randy@...>
 

First off disable Avast anti virus. See what happens after a restart and a couple of days...
If it still crashes we can try something else.

On 7/26/2017 3:47 AM, marvin hunkin wrote:

Hi. Using jaws for windows a screen reader from http://www.freedomscientific.com and using windows 10 64 bit pro on a Toshiba satellite pro c-50-a, and a programming student and have a lot of apps, and don't want to have to rebuild all of them again. At least once a day or maybe more then that windows crhashes, or I get file explorer not responding or visual studio not responding, and so then I lose speech, and then windows crashes. So, have got the latest windows updates, latest windows 10 drivers for my Toshiba. Have got c cleaner and have it moniterring and have Avast anti virus free, and now some times on the system tray lose the Avast and c cleaner icon, and then on my internet connection, and with my republic http://www.myrepublic.com.au in Australia says the windows communication is turned off and have to go in and trouble shoot and fix it at least once or twice a day. Don't want to have to do a reset and is there a program, that will save all my compiled and apps desktop, windows universal. And also is there any good accessible windows back up software, free, and does macreiner and eona work with jaws. Any help please. This is frustrating and then have to click on the recovered files in visual studio

2017 community. Any ideas. Thanks.

Just frustrating and then yesterday had to do a windows update trouble shooting, the windows update feature was disabled and did get one update, which was windows defender. Any help.

 

Thanks .

 

Marvin from Australia.


Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Brian Buhrow
 

hello. The good folks at www.myblindspot.com have worked to make
Quickbooks fully accessible. In addition, they've created a number of
tutorials to help you learn how to use the software nonvisually.
Quickbooks is a fully featured accounting package that can do inventory,
payroll, account management, etc. The gentleman who can tell you all about
it is Richard Kelly. You can reach him at his firstname at
myblindspot.com.
-thanks
-Brian

Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Kerry Fielding <littlemisslovely1973@...>
 

Hi Greg.


I can't say as I've ever found one that works with JAWS very well but Quickbooks is definitely accessible and works on your iDevice.  I'm self-employed and use their quickbooks self employed iPhone app.  The desktop site is ok but I don't find it half asaccessible.  I've posted the link to the UK quickbooks site but if you need a different country such as the US for example, it is available.


https://www.quickbooks.co.uk/accounting-software/features/payroll-software/


Kerry


On 26/07/2017 15:57, Greg Nickel wrote:

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg




Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Paul Martz <skewmatrix@...>
 

I understand a third party has developed a set of JAWS scripts to make QuickBooks accessible, but I have not personally used them. As I understand it, the scripts sell for about $200.

   -Paul

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Greg Nickel
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

 

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg

 

Re: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

HH. Smith Jr.
 

Greg,

 

My Blind spot has made QuickBooks the app of choice.

MyBlindSpot.com

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Greg Nickel
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 10:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

 

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg

 

JAWS and bookkeeping and payroll software

Greg Nickel
 

Can anyone in the forum lend some advice on the most user friendly, fully accessible bookkeeping software that has payroll function?

 

Many thanks.

Greg