Date   

Re: New to the group

Shan Noyes
 

Sorry about that I was just getting frustrated because if you look at Brian's last two emails there's nothing about jaws in them it's just his ranting on about why XP is good and why Windows 7 is good so I don't want to meet the thread because sometimes there's good jams the point I was trying to make is please keep down your rambling to make stuff pertinent specifically Brian

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 26, 2016, at 10:44 AM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hello,

I’d like to respectfully disagree: JAWS for Windows, when viewed from various angles, is a collection of data and code, hence it will behave like any piece of software installed on any operating system. Without proper support from an operating system such as Windows 7 and 10, JAWS would not have existed. For many blind folks out there, affording latest and greatest isn’t practical, hence the statement about reliance on XP and 7.

Nor I think we should act like we have highest authority: I think given the nature of this thread and the fact that not many people know how to use Groups.IO account to manage certain things, asking people to mute threads (spoken in a way that gives possibly wrong impressions) might not be a good idea. Therefore, I think we should leave it up to James (our chief) to deal with this.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: Shan Noyes [mailto:noyes01@...]
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2016 7:51 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: New to the group

 

This is a jaws users list let's please try to stay on topic thank you

Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 26, 2016, at 9:24 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 05:20 am, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:

XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 And for people who actually did that, I want them to recall precisely how bitter that end probably was when they had to make the leap.

I know a number of people still using WinXP, but I also know that most wisely avoid doing anything online (e.g., online banking or the like) where the security compromises involved are huge.  It's gotten to the point where most providers of sensitive web functions like online banking will block you from using them if your browser does not comply with current security standards, and nothing that runs on WinXP that I know of these days does.

I have never, ever, been a bleeding edge adopter of anything.  I always give a shake out period of several months to up to a year or so.  But I also have never, ever been someone who thinks that clinging to the bitter end works out well, either, for reasons I've already stated in a prior message.

Brian


Re: Outlook 2013, Windows 10 & Jaws 17

Kimber Gardner
 

Hi Lauren,

I think you'll find what you're looking for under options under the
file tab. Open Outlook then press alt F and arrow up a couple times
until you hear options. Press enter then arrow down through the
categories. I think some of them are: general, mail, trust center and
a bunch of others. I'm guessing these options will be under mail.

I hope this helps.

On 2/26/16, Lauren Snyder <princessesrule@twc.com> wrote:
I had to reconfigure my Outlook to match my email account. How do I check
to see that my messages for example are included in the reply emails and
other choices under options I thought it was like, your email address,
password, etc. I can't seem to find it.





Sincerely,



Lauren



--
Kimberly


Outlook 2013, Windows 10 & Jaws 17

Lauren Snyder
 

I had to reconfigure my Outlook to match my email account. How do I check to see that my messages for example are included in the reply emails and other choices under options I thought it was like, your email address, password, etc. I can’t seem to find it.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Lauren

 


Re: New to the group

 

Hello,

I’d like to respectfully disagree: JAWS for Windows, when viewed from various angles, is a collection of data and code, hence it will behave like any piece of software installed on any operating system. Without proper support from an operating system such as Windows 7 and 10, JAWS would not have existed. For many blind folks out there, affording latest and greatest isn’t practical, hence the statement about reliance on XP and 7.

Nor I think we should act like we have highest authority: I think given the nature of this thread and the fact that not many people know how to use Groups.IO account to manage certain things, asking people to mute threads (spoken in a way that gives possibly wrong impressions) might not be a good idea. Therefore, I think we should leave it up to James (our chief) to deal with this.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: Shan Noyes [mailto:noyes01@...]
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2016 7:51 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: New to the group

 

This is a jaws users list let's please try to stay on topic thank you

Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 26, 2016, at 9:24 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 05:20 am, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:

XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 And for people who actually did that, I want them to recall precisely how bitter that end probably was when they had to make the leap.

I know a number of people still using WinXP, but I also know that most wisely avoid doing anything online (e.g., online banking or the like) where the security compromises involved are huge.  It's gotten to the point where most providers of sensitive web functions like online banking will block you from using them if your browser does not comply with current security standards, and nothing that runs on WinXP that I know of these days does.

I have never, ever, been a bleeding edge adopter of anything.  I always give a shake out period of several months to up to a year or so.  But I also have never, ever been someone who thinks that clinging to the bitter end works out well, either, for reasons I've already stated in a prior message.

Brian


Re: Thunderbird & Facebook Chat

Maria Campbell
 

Ah too bad.  Thanks.

Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
--Attributed to Jimi Hendrix

On 2/25/2016 10:11 PM, Brad Martin wrote:

Maria,
Facebook eliminated support for the protocol that allowed third party programs to work with Facebook Chat. So to my knowledge, this feature of Thunderbird no longer works. It used to be terrific and very simple, but now if you try, you should encounter problems connecting to Facebook Chat unless something has changed in the last month or so. Sorry.

Brad

On 2/25/2016 3:01 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
I also use Thunderbird pretty successfully.  However, I'm wondering how to set up TB's chat feature with Facebook.
Any ideas appreciated.

Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
--Attributed to Jimi Hendrix

On 2/25/2016 2:58 PM, majno wrote:
Hello. Are you sure about thunderbird? i'm using thunderbird last 2 years without any problem. Maybe you should go deep in thunderbird.

El 25/02/2016 a las 15:32, marvin kotler escribió:
Good afternoon list.  My name is Marvin Kotler and I just upgraded to windows 10.  I am running jfw 17.  Does anyone know of a free e mail program out there that works with jaws? I tried thunderbird and have had not much success.  Any advice would be appreciate





Re: New to the group

 

On Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 07:51 am, Shan Noyes <noyes01@...> wrote:
This is a jaws users list let's please try to stay on topic thank you

This is a JAWS for WINDOWS user group, and this topic is quite pertinent at this time.  Use the "Mute this thread" feature if you do not care for the content of any given thread.



Re: New to the group

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Yes, there’s that happy medium.  I upgraded a lot more readily in the DOS era; cost wasn’t that high, and I could do my own installation.  I wasn’t terribly happy when the phone company blew out my last PC, but I had already used 7 here at work and liked it.  That was really my point.  If Microsoft follows its recent pattern (a good OS, followed by a bad one, than a good one again), 10 should be okay.  Furthermore,, as it’s supposed to be around for a while, most of us will probably get a shot at it.

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2016 10:25 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: New to the group

 

On Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 05:20 am, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:

XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 And for people who actually did that, I want them to recall precisely how bitter that end probably was when they had to make the leap.

I know a number of people still using WinXP, but I also know that most wisely avoid doing anything online (e.g., online banking or the like) where the security compromises involved are huge.  It's gotten to the point where most providers of sensitive web functions like online banking will block you from using them if your browser does not comply with current security standards, and nothing that runs on WinXP that I know of these days does.

I have never, ever, been a bleeding edge adopter of anything.  I always give a shake out period of several months to up to a year or so.  But I also have never, ever been someone who thinks that clinging to the bitter end works out well, either, for reasons I've already stated in a prior message.

Brian


Re: New to the group

Shan Noyes
 

This is a jaws users list let's please try to stay on topic thank you

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 26, 2016, at 9:24 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 05:20 am, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:
XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 And for people who actually did that, I want them to recall precisely how bitter that end probably was when they had to make the leap.

I know a number of people still using WinXP, but I also know that most wisely avoid doing anything online (e.g., online banking or the like) where the security compromises involved are huge.  It's gotten to the point where most providers of sensitive web functions like online banking will block you from using them if your browser does not comply with current security standards, and nothing that runs on WinXP that I know of these days does.

I have never, ever, been a bleeding edge adopter of anything.  I always give a shake out period of several months to up to a year or so.  But I also have never, ever been someone who thinks that clinging to the bitter end works out well, either, for reasons I've already stated in a prior message.

Brian


Re: New to the group

Shan Noyes
 

 This is a jaws use your list let's please try to stay on topic and cut out all these extraneous extra emails thank you

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 26, 2016, at 9:18 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

I love Windows 7, and if you're happy with it and (and the and is important) aren't going to replace your current equipment until after the end of extended support for Windows 7 then it's fine to stay with it.  There is a big, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it," factor.  As a tech geek who participates on several Windows 10 forums I can definitely say that upgrades from Windows 7 to Windows 10 have been more problematic, and the older your hardware and the more "well-used" your system the more likely they are to be problematic.   The biggest issues have cropped up because Windows 10 does not "play well" with a lot of older device drivers.  If you can find one for the specific device that was written for Windows 10 you're golden, or for Windows 8/8.1 that works you're OK, too.  That being said, I myself had to convert a Dell Inspiron 1720 laptop to a Linux machine after trying Windows 10 on it because I could never locate a device driver for the Alps Electric mousepad that would work consistently under Windows 10 (and believe me, I tried lots of them).

There is, however, a flip side to that coin.  The end of support for Windows 7 is in the foreseeable future.  Once official support ends for any operating system it becomes more and more vulnerable to attack over time (until it gets so old that those who do this sort of thing are focusing on the newer OSes for amusement).  Upgrading to Windows 10 when you get new hardware will happen.   There really is a "golden period" where you're participating in the changes with a huge wave of people experiencing the same issues at the same time and where the solution seeking in that cohort is in high gear.  No one can exactly define when that period begins and ends, but it will definitely be over within a year or so.  Late adopters often find it far harder to slog through the reams of "tried and failed" work that is out there after the fact and when there is no one still telling you, "no, you can ignore that, look here for something that worked," when you're asking for help.

Any OS change, even within the same OS family, is a fraught proposition.  But it can be, and often is, profoundly unwise to engage in long-term avoidance when you will eventually be forced to make the change but do so when you're a lot more "on your own" rather than "part of the group."

My two cents.

Brian


Re: New to the group

 

On Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 05:20 am, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:
XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 And for people who actually did that, I want them to recall precisely how bitter that end probably was when they had to make the leap.

I know a number of people still using WinXP, but I also know that most wisely avoid doing anything online (e.g., online banking or the like) where the security compromises involved are huge.  It's gotten to the point where most providers of sensitive web functions like online banking will block you from using them if your browser does not comply with current security standards, and nothing that runs on WinXP that I know of these days does.

I have never, ever, been a bleeding edge adopter of anything.  I always give a shake out period of several months to up to a year or so.  But I also have never, ever been someone who thinks that clinging to the bitter end works out well, either, for reasons I've already stated in a prior message.

Brian


Re: New to the group

 

I love Windows 7, and if you're happy with it and (and the and is important) aren't going to replace your current equipment until after the end of extended support for Windows 7 then it's fine to stay with it.  There is a big, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it," factor.  As a tech geek who participates on several Windows 10 forums I can definitely say that upgrades from Windows 7 to Windows 10 have been more problematic, and the older your hardware and the more "well-used" your system the more likely they are to be problematic.   The biggest issues have cropped up because Windows 10 does not "play well" with a lot of older device drivers.  If you can find one for the specific device that was written for Windows 10 you're golden, or for Windows 8/8.1 that works you're OK, too.  That being said, I myself had to convert a Dell Inspiron 1720 laptop to a Linux machine after trying Windows 10 on it because I could never locate a device driver for the Alps Electric mousepad that would work consistently under Windows 10 (and believe me, I tried lots of them).

There is, however, a flip side to that coin.  The end of support for Windows 7 is in the foreseeable future.  Once official support ends for any operating system it becomes more and more vulnerable to attack over time (until it gets so old that those who do this sort of thing are focusing on the newer OSes for amusement).  Upgrading to Windows 10 when you get new hardware will happen.   There really is a "golden period" where you're participating in the changes with a huge wave of people experiencing the same issues at the same time and where the solution seeking in that cohort is in high gear.  No one can exactly define when that period begins and ends, but it will definitely be over within a year or so.  Late adopters often find it far harder to slog through the reams of "tried and failed" work that is out there after the fact and when there is no one still telling you, "no, you can ignore that, look here for something that worked," when you're asking for help.

Any OS change, even within the same OS family, is a fraught proposition.  But it can be, and often is, profoundly unwise to engage in long-term avoidance when you will eventually be forced to make the change but do so when you're a lot more "on your own" rather than "part of the group."

My two cents.

Brian


Re: New to the group

Mario
 

lately, I've been hearing that too, not just from this list but other sources too. and not everyone agrees.

On 2/26/2016 9:11 AM, john.falter wrote:
Hello group:
I've read that users of windows 8 and 8.1 would do well to move to ten,
but users of seven not nearly so much.

On 2/26/2016 8:20 AM, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) wrote:

I have a feeling 7 is going to be a lot like XP was—having a loyal
user base that will stick until the bitter end.

Ted

*From:*Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
*Sent:* Thursday, February 25, 2016 7:54 PM
*To:* jfw@groups.io
*Subject:* Re: New to the group

Hey Gwen,

I recognize you from that mailing list where that other
screen reader is the center of attention!!

Believe me, you're far from alone in using Win7 with JAWS
(regardless of JAWS version). The majority of my clients are still on
Win7 and I've never had one who had Win8/8.1 (and really hope I don't
now that Win10 is here).

Also, you should consider joining the Windows 10 Screen
Reader Users <https://groups.io/g/win10> group. The screen reader
based questions/answers have far broader applicability than in the
Win10 environment and it may help you with your decision about if/when
to upgrade to Windows 10.

Brian

P.S. Who/what is "the great Orb"




Re: New to the group

john.falter
 

Hello group:
I've read that users of windows 8 and 8.1 would do well to move to ten,
but users of seven not nearly so much.

On 2/26/2016 8:20 AM, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) wrote:

I have a feeling 7 is going to be a lot like XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2016 7:54 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: New to the group

 

Hey Gwen,

         I recognize you from that mailing list where that other screen reader is the center of attention!!

         Believe me, you're far from alone in using Win7 with JAWS (regardless of JAWS version).  The majority of my clients are still on Win7 and I've never had one who had Win8/8.1 (and really hope I don't now that Win10 is here).

         Also, you should consider joining the Windows 10 Screen Reader Users group.  The screen reader based questions/answers have far broader applicability than in the Win10 environment and it may help you with your decision about if/when to upgrade to Windows 10.

Brian

P.S.  Who/what is "the great Orb"





Re: New to the group

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

I have a feeling 7 is going to be a lot like XP was—having a loyal user base that will stick until the bitter end.

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2016 7:54 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: New to the group

 

Hey Gwen,

         I recognize you from that mailing list where that other screen reader is the center of attention!!

         Believe me, you're far from alone in using Win7 with JAWS (regardless of JAWS version).  The majority of my clients are still on Win7 and I've never had one who had Win8/8.1 (and really hope I don't now that Win10 is here).

         Also, you should consider joining the Windows 10 Screen Reader Users group.  The screen reader based questions/answers have far broader applicability than in the Win10 environment and it may help you with your decision about if/when to upgrade to Windows 10.

Brian

P.S.  Who/what is "the great Orb"


Re: JAWS 14 with MS Office 2013 or 2016?

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

2013 is a dandy—power and usability.

 

Ted

 

From: James Homuth [mailto:james@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2016 5:03 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: JAWS 14 with MS Office 2013 or 2016?

 

So it's becoming high time I give thought to retiring my old instalation of Office 2003. For reasons a-plenty, most of them outlined on this list, I'm holding off on JAWS 16 or 17 for the next little while. So my question would be this. How useable are later versions of Office, either 2013 or 2016, with JAWS? I fully expect just about everything to require a learning curve, but if half of that learning curve isn't telling JAWS not to do something dumb, then I may just go for it anyway. Thoughts and opinions are, of course, always welcome and even encouraged.


Re: JAWS-Friendly Cookie Manager

Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Gary. If all you want to do is to delete the cookies for your bank's domain, I have instructions for how to do it with Internet Explorer 8, and I would imagine that the instructions would be similar for IE10 or IE11.
 

How to Delete Session or domain cookies for specific domain

 

 

1. Start Internet Explorer 8, and open the site for which you wish to delete the domain cookies.

 

2. Press F12 for Developer Tools.

 

3. Press Alt, and arrow right to Cache menu.

 

4. Arrow down to "Delete Cookies For This Domain" and press Enter.

 

5. When it asks if you wish to delete cookies for this domain, which would be the domain for the bank, Tab to the "Yes" button and press Enter.

 

6. The cookies will be deleted.

 

----- Original Message -----
From: Gary King
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2016 5:40 PM
Subject: JAWS-Friendly Cookie Manager

Is anyone using a cookie manager that is JAWS Friendly?  I've been having trouble with my online banking site, and I suspect that their advice will be to delete my browser cookies.  It would be nice if I could just delete their particular browser cookie and leave the others alone.
 
Even though I can go to the folder containing my cookies, finding an individual web site's cookie is not so easy without some help from a program that's designed for the purpose.  Any suggestions will be welcome.
 
Gary King
w4wkz@...


__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 13088 (20160225) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Re: JAWS-Friendly Cookie Manager

Gary King
 


Brian,
I may take a look at Maxa Cookie Manager.  There is a review and download link here:
 
 
Gary King
w4wkz@...

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2016 8:19 PM
Subject: Re: JAWS-Friendly Cookie Manager

Gary,

         Thanks.  Now I regret to inform you that when it comes to IE11 and add-ons I can be of virtually no help.  I ran screaming from IE when it didn't support add-ons at all.

         I hope that another reader is using an accessible cookie manager with IE11.

Brian


Re: JAWS 14 with MS Office 2013 or 2016?

Feliciano G
 

I'm not sure, the lowest jaws version  I have used with office 2013 is jaws  15. It should work, I don't see why it wouldn't.

Regards,Feliciano For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v Follow www.twitter.com/theblindman12v 

On Feb 25, 2016, at 7:41 PM, James Homuth <james@...> wrote:

Does 2013 work with JAWS 14?

From: Feliciano G [mailto:theblindman12v@...]
Sent: February-25-16 9:23 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: JAWS 14 with MS Office 2013 or 2016?

I suggest you upgrade to Microsoft office 2013 and stay away from office 2016 for now. Office 2016 isn't as accessible as 2013 with jaws 17. Keep in mind that if you are wanting the outlook mail clients, you upgrade to Microsoft office home and business rather then home and student.

Regards,Feliciano For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v Follow www.twitter.com/theblindman12v  

On Feb 25, 2016, at 2:03 PM, James Homuth <james@...> wrote:

So it's becoming high time I give thought to retiring my old instalation of Office 2003. For reasons a-plenty, most of them outlined on this list, I'm holding off on JAWS 16 or 17 for the next little while. So my question would be this. How useable are later versions of Office, either 2013 or 2016, with JAWS? I fully expect just about everything to require a learning curve, but if half of that learning curve isn't telling JAWS not to do something dumb, then I may just go for it anyway. Thoughts and opinions are, of course, always welcome and even encouraged.


Thunderbird & Facebook Chat

Brad Martin
 

Maria,
Facebook eliminated support for the protocol that allowed third party programs to work with Facebook Chat. So to my knowledge, this feature of Thunderbird no longer works. It used to be terrific and very simple, but now if you try, you should encounter problems connecting to Facebook Chat unless something has changed in the last month or so. Sorry.

Brad

On 2/25/2016 3:01 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
I also use Thunderbird pretty successfully.  However, I'm wondering how to set up TB's chat feature with Facebook.
Any ideas appreciated.

Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
--Attributed to Jimi Hendrix

On 2/25/2016 2:58 PM, majno wrote:
Hello. Are you sure about thunderbird? i'm using thunderbird last 2 years without any problem. Maybe you should go deep in thunderbird.

El 25/02/2016 a las 15:32, marvin kotler escribió:
Good afternoon list.  My name is Marvin Kotler and I just upgraded to windows 10.  I am running jfw 17.  Does anyone know of a free e mail program out there that works with jaws? I tried thunderbird and have had not much success.  Any advice would be appreciate




Re: JAWS 14 with MS Office 2013 or 2016?

James Homuth
 

Does 2013 work with JAWS 14?


From: Feliciano G [mailto:theblindman12v@...]
Sent: February-25-16 9:23 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: JAWS 14 with MS Office 2013 or 2016?

I suggest you upgrade to Microsoft office 2013 and stay away from office 2016 for now. Office 2016 isn't as accessible as 2013 with jaws 17. Keep in mind that if you are wanting the outlook mail clients, you upgrade to Microsoft office home and business rather then home and student.

Regards,Feliciano For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v Follow www.twitter.com/theblindman12v  

On Feb 25, 2016, at 2:03 PM, James Homuth <james@...> wrote:

So it's becoming high time I give thought to retiring my old instalation of Office 2003. For reasons a-plenty, most of them outlined on this list, I'm holding off on JAWS 16 or 17 for the next little while. So my question would be this. How useable are later versions of Office, either 2013 or 2016, with JAWS? I fully expect just about everything to require a learning curve, but if half of that learning curve isn't telling JAWS not to do something dumb, then I may just go for it anyway. Thoughts and opinions are, of course, always welcome and even encouraged.