Date   

Amazon Prime offerings

Jean Menzies <jemenzies@...>
 

Further to my questions about the Kindle reading experience, I’m looking at the stuff included with Amazon Prime. For example, the movie and TV streaming, the music streaming, etc. Is anyone using this with Jaws, or perhaps successfully with an iPhone?
 
Jean


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

David Bailes
 

Hi Nicole,

I'm not sure why you're saying that Audacity is limited to sixteen tracks. Some users on the Audacity4Blind mailing list use many more tracks than that,

David. 

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 09:06 am, Nicole Massey <nyyki@...> wrote:

Though Reaper has an advertised 60 day trial period, those who aren't worried about the ethics of using shareware for longer than the trial period will find that it doesn't disable any functions when the trial ends, so it's not crippleware. I do suggest paying it, as it's a responsive environment and the programmers of it are worth the money. It's also probably the least expensive accessible option for us that has this level of functionality. (Audacity is cheaper, but it's limited to sixteen tracks and lacks some useful features)
And yeah, that's a pretty cool name for a mailing list.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 10:46 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Jim,

Link to Reaper home page <http://www.reaper.fm/> and Sony's Sound Forge <http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/soundforgesoftware> . It looks like Reaper allows a 60-day full-function trial and Sony has trial periods for Sound Forge Pro and Sound Forge Audio Studio. I'm not sure which of the two Nicole was making reference to.

I absolutely love whoever came up with the "Reaper Without Peepers" moniker!

Brian

 


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Ever seen Scent of a Woman?

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 4:53 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

True about learning from teaching. I have had to provide job training in the past, and with each person, I always learned something.

Incidentally, David, I drove a big old Chrysler once down a highway, crossed at a three-way intersection, turned down road, across ditch culvert, and as we were going into the single-car garage, I nearly froze, "what in the world do I think I'm doing," and when my friend said "brake," I delayed a second, then stomped it. Otherwise, the others in the car said I did a bang up job. I would never dream of doing such a crazy thing again, but I am glad that I did it.


Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@...]
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2016 4:39 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Hi,
Amen to that. When I tutor Math or Computers, I learn more from the person I am tutoring than I learn sometimes. Also, the more I explain something, the more ways I can do so putting the same concept in different words. I think that the secret of teaching, is to be able to explain the same concepts in as many ways as possible so that the most people understand what you are saying. Have a great one.


From: Robin Frost <mailto:robini71@...>
Sent: Thursday, February 4, 2016 2:12 PM
To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Hi,
Brian said:

Tutoring is, ideally, a collaboration where each party actually has something that they can teach the other, at least from my perspective.”
And there my friends is one fine turn of phrase and an indication of the heart of a true teacher in my humble view.
It’s always been my experience that those teachers whether officially certified to be so or just those sages who pass in and out of our lives for a time or forever from whom we gain have two things in common. firstly they are willing to engage in the give and take of learning one from another. Secondly that which differentiates the great from the mediocre is the ability not just to pass along factual information about something but also an enthusiasm both for the matter at hand and the one with whom they're engaged along with the process itself.
I laud you for your willingness not only to do the work you do, for participating in this list and engaging with and helping others you aren’t getting paid to work with but also for being willing to learn from us as well as your students. Bravo and cheers to you, well-done!
One more point, while it’s true that in many situations in a windows type environment the spatial location of something on the screen doesn’t often come into play and therefore might not be considered as useful or dismissed as something blind people can’t learn or shouldn’t be concerned about I have to say that embracing the iOS platform and its touch screen has taught me that like practicing skills of orientation and mobility in learning the layout of a room I can also learn the layout of elements on a screen if I have to do so. And discovering that I can learn something of such a seemingly visual nature should I need to do so makes me glad to know I can if I must.
Here’s to learning and dialoging (smile).
Robin




From: Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@...>
Sent: Thursday, February 4, 2016 1:56 PM
To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 10:49 am, Marianne Denning <marianne@...> wrote:


I won't let a sighted person train me on the computer unless they can do everything by using the computer like I do.

Marianne,

That is, of course, entirely our prerogative, but I'd sincerely ask you to reconsider it. Part of what I consider my "value added" is that I can actually construct, for instance, keystroke sequences for unknown/obscure functions in MS-Office programs because I can see feedback that JAWS and NVDA do not (I don't know whether they could not, but it wouldn't be particularly practical) provide "on the fly." Tutoring is, ideally, a collaboration where each party actually has something that they can teach the other, at least from my perspective.

It also really narrows your options, too, but that also is your call.

Brian


Kindle books

Jean Menzies <jemenzies@...>
 

How accessible are Kindle books? I haven’t followed the Kindle issue over the years. I see there is a Kindle app for PC with an accessible plug-in. It says it works with Jaws. Can anyone vouch for that?
 
Thanks.


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Duh, it certainly is.  Oh well, I’m glad to know about the Ctrl-Shift anyhow.  I actually use the links list a lot.  I think my hands just go into business for themselves, once they’re trained.

 

Ted

 

From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 4:30 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Ted, actually the JAWS command that brings up the list of running programs is JAWS key+F10. I know you know this. all these F10 combos can get bewildering.

 

From: Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) [mailto:Ted.Lisle@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 4:27 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Shift F10 is a JAWS command, bringing up a list of running programs.  Ctrl-Shift-F10 works great though.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 3:33 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 12:24 pm, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:

not unless you bypass JAWS; that brings up a list of running programs.  In MS Outlook, F10brings up the ribbon.  In some contexts, it fulfills its historic function, going all the way back to Lotus 1-2-3, or maybe even VisiCalc.

 

Ted

 Ted,

           Are you referring to SHIFT+F10?  I've played with this, I think with NVDA on off, and unless JAWS captures the command it's giving me the context menu (and I don't need the CTRL+ added in File explorer).  It seems that others have reported that JAWS isn't capturing it, and I'd like to have the "straight poop" as they say.

Brian


Microsoft Edge

Mcginnis, Barbara
 

Is Microsoft Edge working with screen readers yet?

 

Barbara McGinnis

Assistive Technology Teacher

Division of Services for the Blind, Rehabilitation Center for the Blind

NC Department of Health and Human Services

 

Classroom 919-527-6799

FAX 919-715-0471

Barbara.McGinnis@...

http://www.ncdhhs.gov/dsb/services/training.htm

 

Center 919-527-6800

305 Ashe Avenue

Raleigh, NC 27606

 

Mail Service Center 2601

Raleigh, NC 27699

 

 

Email correspondence to and from this address is subject to the

North Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties.

__________________________________________________________

          

Twitter  YouTube

Unauthorized disclosure of juvenile, health, legally privileged, or otherwise confidential information, including confidential information relating to an ongoing State procurement effort, is prohibited by law. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and delete all records of this e-mail.

 

 


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

Yep -- a bigger house just means more instruments, especially Hammonds and Leslies. But it's amazing how fast you can use up sixteen tracks.
(And now you've made me wish my Hammond wasn't in storage right now)

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 11:39 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 09:32 am, Nicole Massey <nyyki@...> wrote:


One of the truths of working in recorded music is that somehow you're going to need at least one more track.

This axiom exists in many forms and in many spheres. I collect orchids and, "There's always room for one more orchid," or, "I really need one of {whichever one of several million plants you don't have and happen to be seeing at that moment}," tends to occur with frightening frequency. I thank heaven that I am relatively immune to the collector's impulse. I was going to say "endless collector's impulse" but that's redundant!

More is more is a more common feeling than Mies "Less is More."

Brian


Re: Mute this thread OR "Out of Hand" Topics

 

Next report:  My mutes are not muting at all in digests.  For those for whom muting is working and who participate primarily or exclusively via e-mail, do you receive your messages from JFW as individual e-mail messages or subscribe to one of the digests?   If it's working differently for other people receiving digests than it is for me then things are getting into deep weird territory.

Brian


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

 

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 09:32 am, Nicole Massey <nyyki@...> wrote:
One of the truths of working in recorded music is that somehow you're going to need at least one more track.

 This axiom exists in many forms and in many spheres.   I collect orchids and, "There's always room for one more orchid," or, "I really need one of {whichever one of several million plants you don't have and happen to be seeing at that moment}," tends to occur with frightening frequency.  I thank heaven that I am relatively immune to the collector's impulse.  I was going to say "endless collector's impulse" but that's redundant!

More is more is a more common feeling than Mies "Less is More."

Brian


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

One of the truths of working in recorded music is that somehow you're going to need at least one more track. And when you're including any FX processing in the project then those additional tracks become very handy.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 11:11 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Nicole,

I agree regarding Reaper and paying. A $60 individual license, that even allows limited commercial use, and a $225 full commercial license for someone doing constant commercial-grade work is an absolute steal.

That being said, and given the original request that spawned this thread, I had a little chuckle at "it's limited to 16 tracks . . .!" Sixteen tracks might be limited to someone such as yourself, but for most people looking for a sound editor that goes beyond bare basics, but don't need full professional, sixteen tracks is overkill times somewhere in the range of thirteen to fifteen!! Even more so if you install the add-ins that allow Audacity to do MP3 conversion and a myriad other filters,etc.

Brian


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

 

Nicole,

         I agree regarding Reaper and paying.  A $60 individual license, that even allows limited commercial use, and a $225 full commercial license for someone doing constant commercial-grade work is an absolute steal.

         That being said, and given the original request that spawned this thread, I had a little chuckle at "it's limited to 16 tracks . . .!"  Sixteen tracks might be limited to someone such as yourself, but for most people looking for a sound editor that goes beyond bare basics, but don't need full professional, sixteen tracks is overkill times somewhere in the range of thirteen to fifteen!!  Even more so if you install the add-ins that allow Audacity to do MP3 conversion and a myriad other filters,etc.

Brian


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

Though Reaper has an advertised 60 day trial period, those who aren't worried about the ethics of using shareware for longer than the trial period will find that it doesn't disable any functions when the trial ends, so it's not crippleware. I do suggest paying it, as it's a responsive environment and the programmers of it are worth the money. It's also probably the least expensive accessible option for us that has this level of functionality. (Audacity is cheaper, but it's limited to sixteen tracks and lacks some useful features)
And yeah, that's a pretty cool name for a mailing list.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 10:46 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Jim,

Link to Reaper home page <http://www.reaper.fm/> and Sony's Sound Forge <http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/soundforgesoftware> . It looks like Reaper allows a 60-day full-function trial and Sony has trial periods for Sound Forge Pro and Sound Forge Audio Studio. I'm not sure which of the two Nicole was making reference to.

I absolutely love whoever came up with the "Reaper Without Peepers" moniker!

Brian


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Hope so, I’m 63.  I don’t feel it, except at 4:00 A.M. , when I respond to that darn alarm; then I feel every minute of it!

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 11:52 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 02:45 am, Angel <angel238@...> wrote:

do so with arrogance

Sincerely, physician, heal thyself.

Also, I don't think that 53 years is "youthful" in any common sense of the term.


Re: Did This Message Get Through?

Gerald Levy
 

 
Okay, I followed your suggestions and added groups.io to my Safe Senders list.  It does not appear on my Blocked Senders list, and I have not created any message rules .  And the “Permenantly Delete Junk Email...” box is unchecked.  As for switching to IMA, I was told by Verizon that only POP3 is available for DSL customers.  I suspect that the problem of not receiving my sent messages in my In Box is related to a problem with Groups.IO itself, not with my WLM Junk settings.  I have contacted Groups.IO support to see whether they can offer a fix for this problem and am awaiting a response.  But if all else fails, can I simply add my email address to the “TO” or “CC” field of any message I send to a Groups.IO list to insure that it is routed to my In Box as well as to the other members of the list?  Or is this work around impractical or unworkable?  Thanks.
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 10:27 AM
Subject: Re: Did This Message Get Through?
 

Gerald,

        Just FYI, Verizon, like most of the major ISPs, has had IMAP access for quite a while now.  At some point I'd suggest you change from POP to IMAP as there are a number of advantages that go beyond the scope of this message.

        There are two things I'd check in WLM, the first less likely likely to be the problem than the first.  First, on the Home ribbon for WLM, which is what is open by default when you fire it up, the Junk button is a split button, and you need to activate the "dropdown half" of the split and choose the "Safety Options" menu item, alternatively, you can get straight to it with ALT+H,J,S.  On the main Options tab, be certain that the "Permanently delete suspected junk e-mail instead of moving it to the Junk e-mail folder" checkbox is not checked.  Also go to the Blocked Senders tab to make sure that groups.io is not in that domain names list.  You could also go to the Safe Senders tab and add the groups.io domain name there.

         Second, check that you didn't create any message rules that might do something unexpected with groups.io e-mail messages.  The easiest way to open the message rules dialog is ALT+O,R.  If you have never created any message rules the New Rule Dialog should open.  If it does, you have no rules, just close it and you're done.  If, however, you have a rule or rules, the Rules dialog will open.  Double check that none of the rules is somehow deleting anything coming in from groups.io.  Message rules are only applied to POP e-mail messages, because POP messages are processed in this way on the client side, not the server side.

Brian


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

For sound Forge you're going to want to pick it up from any music retailer like www.sweetwater.com or just about anywhere else. You'll want to downgrade to Sound Forge 8 for the best accessibility experience. Be forewarned -- this kind of quality comes with a price tag, unless you're running an OS that can run some of the older Sound Forge LE versions.
I don't have the url for Reaper handy, but a web search should turn it up in the first few links -- Ixquick has the download site in the first two.

-----Original Message-----
From: HAMILTON [mailto:jim.hamilton@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 10:30 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

Thanks. I have had limited success with GoldWave; so, would like to try something else. Do you have links for where to locate "reaper" and "sound forge"? Much appreciated. Jim H


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

 

Jim,

          Link to Reaper home page and Sony's Sound Forge.  It looks like Reaper allows a 60-day full-function trial and Sony has trial periods for Sound Forge Pro and Sound Forge Audio Studio.  I'm not sure which of the two Nicole was making reference to.

          I absolutely love whoever came up with the "Reaper Without Peepers" moniker!

Brian 


Re: Any good audio editors that work with jaws?

HAMILTON
 

Thanks. I have had limited success with GoldWave; so, would like to try something else. Do you have links for where to locate "reaper" and "sound forge"? Much appreciated. Jim H


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 07:51 am, Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) <ted.lisle@...> wrote:
Our vendor had the mistaken impression, based upon a superficial knowledge of accessibility, that its program met the requirements, it didn’t even come close.

 Ted,

         I just said to someone else yesterday in a private e-mail that a blind entrepreneur could probably make a fortune by setting up a full-featured accessibility testing operation and marketing to government entities (which are legally bound by the ADA [yes, I know it gets ignored, but often not by intent, but by ignorance]) and businesses that are genuinely interested in accessibility.

         Let's face it, there are few entities among those who are genuinely interested in maximizing accessibility that actually have people with the skill sets to do the real world testing necessary to be sure that what they think they've created as accessible actually is accessible.  When it comes to accessibility related code development one of my favorite quotations, which applies to many situations, definitely applies to it in particular:  "In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, in practice there is."

         I can practically guarantee you that some of what's put out there that is genuinely believed to be accessible by those who developed it, and using practices that are correct and appropriate, can be blown apart by just a teeeeeeny oversight (or a few of those) and the kind of testing that gets done by those who don't use screen readers in their daily life, using them for testing, is probably a bit more than cursory at best and perfunctory at worst.   You have to have a skilled screen reader user to do accessibility testing and I will be the first person to say that most sighted people, including myself, are far from skilled screen reader users.  No matter how much we know, no matter how many times we "play blind" and turn off our screens and use these for hours and hours to develop skills, that's still nothing like the depth of skill developed by people who actually have to use these for actual access.   I do not kid myself into believing that I will ever come close to being a skilled screen reader user no matter how long I work with them because I will never be using them for real, constant, day-to-day computer access (barring some change in my visual status that would require it).  I have tried to encourage one of my friends who's a triple screen reader user to re-enter the tutoring game just because I know, and repeatedly say, that there's nothing like another actual user to teach someone how to use something.  They have skills, and perspectives "in their bones," that I never can have.

For any skill set, depth is only acquired by long term practice.  I've learned that with every career change and entry into new territory within a given sphere of practice.

Brian


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Same thing happened here a while back (some of you have seen my posts on Silverlight).  Our vendor had the mistaken impression, based upon a superficial knowledge of accessibility, that its program met the requirements, it didn’t even come close.  We’re now some two or three years down the road, everyone has learned a lot, and things are working.

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 10:20 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 10:54 pm, Soronel Haetir <soronel.haetir@...> wrote:

They solved an
actual problem and sad to say the slice of potential customers unable
to deal with them is small enough that I can well see companies having
better things to focus on. Companies don't _owe_ us anything.

And even if the companies do "owe you something," Captchas, as I already pointed out, at length, came into existence to address a pressing and immediate problem that was getting worse and worse and worse.  It was far more important to stop it, as dead as possible, and quickly, than anything else.

I have no problem with people complaining about Captchas, advocating for changes, etc.  That's been done and those issues have been identified and registered.  The creation of the reCaptcha is a direct result.

What I do have a problem with is certain people acting like it's OK to hold the false belief that Captchas were a targeted attack on accessibility and the blind.  They weren't, they just had that as a very nasty side effect.  The companies had a choice to make based upon the technology available at the time, and if it fixed their major issue, and it did, while screwing over a tiny fraction of their customer base, which it did, any sane person knows how the math goes with that one and that it's the math, and nothing else, that was the primary consideration.  It wasn't about you, and treating it as though it was isn't doing anyone any favors.  Knowing the difference between being attacked, and being collateral damage, gives one perspective.

My attitude has to do with addressing reality and stepping outside one's own bubble, which some seem incapable of doing.


Re: Mute this thread OR "Out of Hand" Topics

 

Well, some interesting developments.

Muting multiple threads has not prevented me from getting the "Full Featured Daily Digest" in any way, shape or form.  The kicker is that the threads are not muted within it.  I muted this thread, the "test" thread, before posting the entries saying I'd muted them and the "Did this message get through?" thread for good measure.  All of the subsequent follow-up messages have appeared in my Full Featured Daily Digest.

I'll now tweak my settings back to Plain Daily Digest to see if the mute is successful there.

Brian