Date   

Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Again, a huge amen!

 

Ted

 

From: Jeanette McAllister [mailto:jeanette@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 8:32 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Hello Everyone:

I have been following this thread and trying to decide if I want to chime in and here I go… let’s see how it goes.

 As a blind assistive technology teacher I can honestly say I could see the computer at one time. I lost my vision suddenly five years ago. That being said, I know where Brian is coming from as well as the individuals on this list who have no vision. I am totally blind, but I am fortunate in that I know what a computer screen looks like. That being said, I have empathy for those who have never seen the screen. I emboss braille diagrams of a screen so they know what they are looking at.

I have worked with students who want to know what the screen looks like (I am able to describe it to them); I also have students who could care less, they just want to be able to do their job. I start out by asking my students (and having them show me) what they know about the computer and JAWS, Window Eyes, or NVDA. I then tailor my lesson plans from what I’ve learned from our conversation. Every student is different; they have their own learning style. There is no “one size fits all”.

 For those who only want a blind person to teach them… that is great… but unfortunately we live in a sighted world. In the workplace you need to be able to show a sighted individual what you are “seeing”.  My teacher was sighted, and because I was newly blind at that time in my life it made sense.

As someone who is totally blind, I agree to certain extent about turning the monitor off so a sighted individual knows how it feels. I don’t know Brian personally, but I’ve read his posts, and I have learned a lot. Don’t judge based on whether a teacher is blind or sighted. Let their work speak for them.

 

I probably ruffled some feathers, and sorry if I did, but we’re all here for the same reason. To help others learn.

 

Jeanette McAllister  PhD

President / CEO

Assistive Technology Tutor

 

                                

A Heart Staffing                                                   

PO Box 1277

Franklin, VA 23851

Direct: 757-346-0708

www.aheartstaffing.com

www.linkedin.com/in/aheartstaffing

 

Member-National Employment Committee – NFB

http://employment.nfb.org/

                                                                    

Member-  Virginia State Rehabilitation Council

                  Dept for the Blind and Visually Impaired         

 

"Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant."

         --Robert Louis Stevenso

 

From: Robin Frost [mailto:robini71@...]
Sent: Friday, February 5, 2016 7:53 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Hi,

I believe she’s still found at

Robin

 

 

From: Angel

Sent: Friday, February 5, 2016 6:39 AM

Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Reading this thread caused me to look up Kathy Anne Murtha's courses on the internet.  I was unable to find them.  Has she discontinued teaching on the internet?  She also sold a course for access technology trainers.  Who learned to use their keyboards alone.  As she was totally blind.  I still have in my archives her windows courses for XP.  I learned quite a lot from them.  Perhaps, if you were to create something similar to her courses for your students they might prove as helpful as were her courses for us.

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 5:18 PM

Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 02:04 pm, Maria Campbell <lucky1inct@...> wrote:

I don't mind hearing sighted jargon as long as it is translated into something I can understand on the keyboard.

This actually brings up an interesting sub-question.  Other than when actually instructing on what keystrokes are necessary to accomplish a given action, and during practice to master that action, when I also mention the action name and/or jargon that goes with it, I do not generally ever mention the keystrokes in the future.  I presume that once someone has mastered "select" in the context of a file or files or in the context of a word through a text block that I not only don't, but shouldn't, be mentioning the keystrokes again.  I simply say "select" and the appropriate whatever comes after for the context in question.  I presume that the necessary nuts-and-bolts are already understood and should be used as the basis for building upon more complex tasks.

Is there any reason to keep reiterating the keystrokes once a given action appears to have been mastered rather than just using the action name itself?

Brian

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


Re: cortana

 

David,

         Thanks for that invaluable piece of information that changing your default web browser can allow you to also change your default search provider where Cortana is involved.  

         I honestly can't remember at this point, but I believe that Edge is actually set up as the default web browser under Windows 10 and you have to tweak settings to make IE the default.  That makes me wonder if you could play the same trick with IE by changing it's default search engine?  I don't use IE with any regularity, but instructions for changing its default search engine to Google on their help site read:

Internet Explorer 11

  1. Open Internet Explorer.
  2. In the top right corner of the search box, click the down arrow.
  3. Click Add.
  4. Select Google.
  5. Click Add to Internet Explorer.
  6. Check the box next to"Make this my default search provider."
  7. Click Add.

One can, of course, select something other than the Google search engine and follow the same process.

Brian


Re: clickable

 

Mark,

         If it follows convention regarding a click then a left mouse button press is a single click.  On the desktop layout that's NumPad Slash and laptop it's CAPS LOCK+8.  If you happen to be using a laptop and don't have the mousepad completely disabled you can use the left mouse pad button, with a single press, too.

Brian


Windows Password - Eliminating need on wake

 

1. Open Control Panel.

2. Open Power Settings.

3. Find "Require a Password on wakeup" link and activate it.

4. Find "Don't require a password" radio button under the "Password protection on wakeup" section.  Activate it.

5. Activate "Save Changes" button.


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Ribbons are pretty easy, and FS has furnished a neat tutorial on them.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: Maria Campbell [mailto:lucky1inct@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 7:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

People will learn what they need when they need it. That even includes the possibility of me having to learn to do ribbons, which I am avoiding right now. It doesn't matter much how or when you learn, it just matters that you do.


Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
--Attributed to Jimi Hendrix

On 2/5/2016 6:32 AM, Jason White via Groups.io wrote:
Angel <angel238@...> wrote:
The insert t was the first command my instructor taught me. I only
had two days of formal instruction. I was given books, and tapes
from which to learn. That way, time was saved for all concerned.
I'm a long-term proponent of the idea that people should be taught the
foundations which enable them to read documentation, participate in
the user community and learn independently.

I've heard unfortunate anecdotes about screen reader users who arrive
at university not knowing how to use table navigation commands and
other important features. To succeed in higher education and careers
that demand considerable work with computers (in whatever field),
those skills need to be in place and to be kept current.

Screen readers such as JAWS have commands designed to improve the
efficiency of interacting with the Web and desktop applications. I
think it's necessary to know more than the basics in order to work
efficiently and productively - especially if you're using computers as
your primary tool in much of your work.




Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Amen!

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 7:33 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Angel <angel238@...> wrote:
The insert t was the first command my instructor taught me. I only
had two days of formal instruction. I was given books, and tapes from
which to learn. That way, time was saved for all concerned.

I'm a long-term proponent of the idea that people should be taught the foundations which enable them to read documentation, participate in the user community and learn independently.

I've heard unfortunate anecdotes about screen reader users who arrive at university not knowing how to use table navigation commands and other important features. To succeed in higher education and careers that demand considerable work with computers (in whatever field), those skills need to be in place and to be kept current.

Screen readers such as JAWS have commands designed to improve the efficiency of interacting with the Web and desktop applications. I think it's necessary to know more than the basics in order to work efficiently and productively - especially if you're using computers as your primary tool in much of your work.


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

That's how I learned my first Word processor. I remember placing a handful of calls to IBM (the program was DisplayWrite), but it was mostly the manual. Worked pretty well too.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: Angel [mailto:angel238@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 7:07 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

The insert t was the first command my instructor taught me. I only had two days of formal instruction. I was given books, and tapes from which to learn. That way, time was saved for all concerned.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Carolyn Arnold" <4carolyna@...>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity


Barbara can. I remember how she impressed on me the JAWS commands of Insert T and also Insert F. It's things like that which are really helpful. I did not know those commands.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Angel [mailto:angel238@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 4, 2016 2:17 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

This is why a sighted computer instructor should either learn to use the keyboard exclusively before attempting to instruct a totally blind individual. Who will never at all use a mouse to traverse his screen. Or, he should shadow a totally blind access technology instructor. Or seek out Kathy Anne Murtha's demonstration courses. Which were featured on ACB Radios Main Minue some years ago. Though They are outdated now. Hearing them would give the sighted computer accessibility computer instructor an idea of how to properly explain to a totally blind person computer concepts.
To ask a blind person if he is "very blind" is similar to asking a person if he is "very black", in my opinion. This sort of language gives the idea you, as a sighted person, are focusing more than is necessary on the difference between you, as a sighted person, and the blind person. When all that should matter is whether or not the blind person will be using the keyboard exclusively or whether he does have residual vision. I and my totally blind friends also have no trouble with the understanding of directions. Few people, in my estimation do.

----- Original Message -----
From: Jean Menzies <mailto:jemenzies@...>
To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 12:13 PM
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Hi Brian,

First, perhaps a better way than asking “How blind are you”, might be to simply ask straight up if the person has any useful residual vision that would be helpful when learning the computer. They will know the answer. lol.

As for directional elements, I am congenitally blind and have no problem with that so far as it goes. However, because JAWS works in a linear fashion, the visual layout doesn’t always match up. For example, when people tell me to click on a link on the left of the page, that has no meaning so far as JAWS is concerned. So, that kind of direction is pointless. Yes, thee are arrows to move left, right, up and down, but that is about as far as is important for me in terms of directional visual concept of layout.

And, you said:
I mean, I realize that a screen reader user does not literally click or right click, but they had ought to know that click translates to select (most of the time), double click translates to activate ...

Gee, huh? I’ve been using JAWS since 2001 and am a fairly decent user. I didn’t know that. I thought click was like pressing enter or spacebar to activate something. I thought double click was like right clicking. And speaking of “clicking”, I still don’t get left and right clicks per se. I know that right click is like bringing up the context menu, but I’m not sure what a left click really is.

I just was wondering why you thought this concept of “clicking” should be obvious to anyone who has never used a mouse.

Jean




From: Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@...>
Sent: Thursday, February 4, 2016 7:35 AM
To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity


Hello All,

I have recently been e-mailing back and forth with several members here off-forum about topics and issues that go beyond the scope of discussion here. In the course of a specific exchange, and from the previous occurrence here of someone telling me, "that's a sighted answer," I composed the following in an e-mail, which I'll share here verbatim:

--------------------------------

I actually try to avoid purely visual descriptions to the extent I can. You may find the following amusing, and it took me a long time to get comfortable asking it, but the first question I ask any of my clients when we start tutoring is, "How blind are you?" I often have very sketchy information about what residual vision, if any, they have and it's critical to know that (and whether it will remain) as far as how to approach certain things. I then follow up with, "Has your vision always been this way or could you see previously?" Both of these answers factor in to whether I ever mention specific colors, for instance, because the actuality, as opposed to the abstract concept, of color is meaningless to those who've never had the sensory experience of color. Everyone, though, has to have the concepts of left, right, up, down in both the vertical and horizontal planes, so I don't hesitate to say something like "at the lower right"
because I know that that translates in a very specific way once you have any orientation at all to "how you get where" in relation to your own computer screen. If this is a bad idea, for reasons I can't fathom as a sighted person, I welcome suggestions as to what is more appropriate and efficient for communicating location information for access. Mind you, I do use specifics like "in the main menu bar," "in the insert ribbon," "4th button over by tabbing," etc..

I've never understood "the furor" that some people get into over the use of common computer actions like click, right click, triple-finger double-tap, etc. I mean, I realize that a screen reader user does not literally click or right click, but they had ought to know that click translates to select (most of the time), double click translates to activate, there exists a "right click" function to allow you to bring up context menus (which are often a godsend), etc. This is a situation where I actually feel it's incumbent on the student to ask if they do not understand what a specific "sighted" reference which is what they'll always be hearing from someone other than a fellow screen reader user translates to in "screen-readerese." You're never going to get a sighted assistant telling you to "press spacebar to select/activate" something, they'll tell you either to select it or to click on it. If you go to training classes for non-screen reader software you absolutely have to know and understand how common computing control jargon "translates" for you. Mind you, if I've got an absolute beginner I teach the translation at the outset but what I don't do is use screen readerese unless it's essential. I think that limits independence rather than building it.

--------------------------------

Just as I said yesterday that it is members of the cohort here, not I, who are best able to determine if a given document is accessible via JAWS. The cohort here is also better able to instruct me in where my assumptions, presumptions, techniques may either be completely wrong or in need of some improvement.

The only thing I will ask is that if something in the above is considered really offensive, please don't excoriate me about that, but make me aware that it is offensive and why. I am honestly trying to get better at what I do both as a tutor and as a sighted person working with people with visual impairments. I know that my frame of reference is different than yours, or at least could be, and that it may be in need of adjustment. The only way I can make that adjustment is to put my thoughts out there and ask for help.

I'll close with a quotation from Carlin Romano that I think has direct parallels here, "When intellectuals take their ideas to the mass market, they are not just doing a good deed for the mass market. They are doing a good thing for themselves. The mass marketplace of ideas proves to be a better critic of big assumptions in any field than is the specialized discipline, or one's peers."

Brian


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

What is so arduous about using a common vocabulary.  A mouse click is a mouse click, whether you’re doing it with the JAWS keys or with a physical mouse.  Even the JAWS training material uses this common language, so I see nothing unusual about asking a blind person to learn it.  If you ever have to explain a problem to an IT person, it’ll come in mighty handy.  In fact, I learned again last week that knowing how a program is supposed to work could even help me resolve a problem I was having.

 

I admit sharing what must have been a common apprehension when Windows began to come on—a fear of being left behind, of seeing hard-won gains eroding, but, like so many of the things about which we worry, it didn’t happen.  Remember trying to access a PDF file in 1995?  Now most of us use them daily. Some things actually get better over time.

 

Ted

 

From: Angel [mailto:angel238@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 6:29 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

I appreciate you.  Because you share my views.  As you come from a different perspective than those exhibiting arrogance regarding some things.  The reason sighted people use computers is because they appear easy for them to use.  If they were made to appear as difficult for sighted people to use, as they have been made to appear from reading some of these posts, and it seems, Bryans posts reflect his style of teaching, I doubt many would have the courage it takes to bother to learn to use one.  Computers and smart phones are made easier for all sighted people to learn and to use with each upgrade.  Why shouldn't we blind computer and smart device users share in that fun and excitement.  Rather than causing their use to seem such an arduous task.  Having to learn how sighted people accomplish tasks for those who aren't intending to make computing their career defeats the idea computing ought first to be a pleasurable experience.  The thing which appealed to me first, when I got my Arkenstone product along with open Book one was the simple joy of being able to read the printed page for the first time in my life.  As you all know, the original arkenstone product was simply a Windows 3.1 machine with the Open Book program installed.  Jaws for dos wasn't even installed on the product.  There wasn't even a monitor sold with the machine.  The machine was designed to fit a particular market.  There were those who used Jaws for dos quite successfully.  But, there was a market for those of us who never wanted to do so.  For me, and I am sure, for many of us, there was the mere exhilaration of being able, for the first time in our lives, to go to the local library, as I did, and take print books home to scan for our own private reading.  Such memories won't be easily forgotten.  We didn't have to learn things for which we had no immediate use.  The computing experience should be just as fun for the blind end user as it seemed to me to be then.  No one should cause the learning curve to appear so steep the fun is removed from the experience.  Again, I ask:  If sighted people had to go through learning things, just because they are easier for the instructor to teach, or having to learn so much the fun is removed from the learning experience, how many computers would mister Gates sell?  Even as a child, there were sighted teachers who didn't teach us blind students things.  Because they were too difficult for our sighted teachers to bother to learn, or the sighted teachers didn't want to take the time to learn them.  The Cramner Abacus was one such example.  Which I could well have learned to use as a child.  But, had to wait till a blind instructor instructing for our local agency for the blind introduced me to       as an adult.    ----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 5:04 PM

Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

We haven't missed out on the use of the context menus at all, at least not me.
We are told to press the applications key or the f10 key, which is the same as the right mouse click.
I don't mind hearing sighted jargon as long as it is translated into something I can understand on the keyboard.


Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...
 
When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
--Attributed to Jimi Hendrix
 

On 2/4/2016 3:53 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 01:34 pm, Jean Menzies <jemenzies@...> wrote:

I agree with the poster that a more appropriate use of language here would be to “select” something, etc. In other words, name the action/result, rather than referencing it through sighted jargon.

 Jean,

          At this point I'm convinced that, on both sides [so to speak - this isn't a battle, it's an exchange of ideas] there is some talking past each other going on.

          I will say this, then I am going to let it go.  I often, probably more often than not, say "select" something when that's what I want someone to do.  I do, occasionally, slip and say "click on" something when I would generally say "select" in the context of tutoring.  It simply happens.  I've been a classroom instructor, too, and you just find yourself occasionally (and, in that situation, almost exclusively) using the jargon of the majority, and when it comes to graphical user interfaces that majority is the sighted and the jargon relates to what they (I/we) do.  I am, however, acutely aware of the context shift when I'm doing private tutoring and adjust accordingly.

          All I'm saying is that I think it's essential to teach my students that should I, or anyone else assisting them, for that matter, say "click on" something that this means "select" something.  I'm not doing anyone any favors by assiduously avoiding any incursion of the most common computer use terminology because my student so happens to be using a screen reader.  I'm doing them a disservice if I don't make the connection clear between what they will hear far more commonly and what that means practically.

          Now, from just what I've learned here, I'm actually shocked at how few people have ever been formally taught about context menus and their invocation via the right mouse click, whether one is using an actual mouse or alternate input device to generate it.  These menus are things of beauty, and high efficiency, because they generally are:  

  1. presented as true menus, which virtually every screen-reader user on this forum has claimed they like best.
  2. present only the things that are possible for the object type you have focus on (though there can be stippled out items if their actual use is not possible given the confluence of circumstances at that moment).

          And, finally, so that I can have people storming all over me and decrying my breathing their air, it's about my making my students maximally functional in the computer world, not the JAWS world, as far as I'm concerned.  That means making sure that they understand concepts that others do one way that they will do another, but so that when that concept is named that other way they absolutely know what that means functionally to them.  You can't, and shouldn't, expect to operate in an assistive technology bubble.

Brian

 


clickable

Mark Furness
 

I forgot how to click something that says it is clickable.

Thank you for your help!
Mark


Re: cortana

David Bailes
 

 Hi Russell,

If you're using Internet Explorer as your default browser, then if Cortana sends you to the web, then the browser uses bing, regardless of the setting of your search provider in Internet Explorer. However, if your default browser is Firefox, then Firefox uses whatever search provider is set in Firefox. 

David. 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 07:13 pm, Russell Solowoniuk <rsolowoniuk@...> wrote:

Hi Marvin,

 

I haven’t used Cortana a whole lot, but when I do use it, I find it works really well. Not sure what you mean about accounts. To use Cortana, I just press the Windows Key, tab once to the microphone button, press space, wait for the sound, and then ask a question. Cortana usually responds quite quickly, and mostly accurately. Sometimes she will send me to the web for a search. This is the only thing I don’t like. Cortana uses Bing as her search engine of choice. I wish there were a way to change this to Gooogle. Other than that, I like her! J

 

HTH

 

Russell

 

From: marvin hunkin [mailto:startrekcafe@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2016 4:11 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: cortana

 

Hi. What are your experiences of using Cortana. For windows 10? Do you find it agimmick. Or do you find it useful. Have used it a couple of times. Wish there was an auto login, for the Cortana accounts.

Marvin.

 

 


Re: Did This Message Get Through?

Gerald Levy
 

 
I have WLM set to POP, which is used by my ISP, Verizon.  I checked my email settings on my Verizon account page, and the spam detector is set to on, although none of the messages I have sent to the JFW list are showing up in either my Verizon spam folder or my WLM Junk Messages folder.
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2016 8:32 PM
Subject: Re: Did This Message Get Through?
 

Gerald,

          Are you using POP or IMAP to download your e-mail messages from your server to Windows Live Mail 2012?

          I've got a couple of theories, none of which are related to the "mute" link here, but it's impossible to guide you any further without knowing whether you're using POP or IMAP.

Brian


cortana clarification

Marvin Hunkin <startrekcafe@...>
 

Hi. Well when I had windows 7, was able be able to login in without having to enter a password. As I have Cortana and the Microsoft account, wish I could auto login all the time, instead having to type in a password, 10 or 15 or more times a day, when I put my machine to sleep. And in the middle of doing things, like my online programming course.

Marvin.


Respond offlist please if interested: A session or two on NVDA and other screen readers during NVDACon International 2016 in April

 

Hi all,

After seeing several replies offlist regarding comparisons between JAWS and NVDA or posts from people who’d like to learn more about NVDA, I decided to add a session or two during upcoming NVDACon International 2016 in April (http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/nvdacon.php). These sessions will mainly focus on what users of screen readers such as JAWS will need to know when using NVDA, as well as comparisons between screen readers. Please let me know offlist (yes, offlist please) if interested.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

 

Joseph S. Lee

Chair, NVDA Tenth Anniversary Planning Committee (http://groups.io/g/nvdacon)

 

 


Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Les Kriegler <kriegler@...>
 

Brian, if everyone quoted only one line, then this would be a non-issue for me. When I have read quoted messages, generally the entire message, or at least certainly several lines are quoted. I do understand your point, and I do notice that you quote only one line, and that certainly makes a difference.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 7, 2016 12:11 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Les,

And if there is a distinct preference among the cohort for "bottom quoting" I am more than willing to follow that convention. This is a "when in Rome" thing, but there's been no fiat from the emperor that I'm aware of. I am certainly sensitive to not wanting to make messages any more difficult to read than they must be.

I'll disagree slightly, though, on participants occasionally not understanding what a message was referencing or in remembering what was said in other or very long recent threads. There have been a number of instances where my, "Was he/she reading the same thread I'm reading?," or, "Doesn't so and so remember that I/he/she said that very thing in thread X just two days ago? It doesn't bear repeating now," reactions kicked in.

Brian, and this is an instance of thread drift that I think is helpful, JAWS-centered or not and original topic centered or not


Re: cortana

Russell Solowoniuk
 

Hi Marvin,

 

I haven’t used Cortana a whole lot, but when I do use it, I find it works really well. Not sure what you mean about accounts. To use Cortana, I just press the Windows Key, tab once to the microphone button, press space, wait for the sound, and then ask a question. Cortana usually responds quite quickly, and mostly accurately. Sometimes she will send me to the web for a search. This is the only thing I don’t like. Cortana uses Bing as her search engine of choice. I wish there were a way to change this to Gooogle. Other than that, I like her! J

 

HTH

 

Russell

 

From: marvin hunkin [mailto:startrekcafe@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2016 4:11 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: cortana

 

Hi. What are your experiences of using Cortana. For windows 10? Do you find it agimmick. Or do you find it useful. Have used it a couple of times. Wish there was an auto login, for the Cortana accounts.

Marvin.

 


Re: Did This Message Get Through?

Ted Sparks
 

Yes, but I think you already should have the answer.

 

From: Gerald Levy [mailto:bwaylimited@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2016 4:49 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Did This Message Get Through?

 

 

Can somebody let me know whether they received this message?  Thanks.

 

Gerald

 

 


Re: Did This Message Get Through?

 

Gerald,

          Are you using POP or IMAP to download your e-mail messages from your server to Windows Live Mail 2012?

          I've got a couple of theories, none of which are related to the "mute" link here, but it's impossible to guide you any further without knowing whether you're using POP or IMAP.

Brian


Re: Did This Message Get Through?

Melissa Stott <mstott69@...>
 

That is really weird, because I am also using Windows live mail.

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 7, 2016, at 6:55 PM, Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...> wrote:


Okay, so my messages are being received by other list members. But for some reason, they are suddenly not showing up in my WLM 2012 In Box. Everything was working fine a few days ago, and now I am suddenly not getting my sent messages in my In Box. I am having the same problem with the three other Groups.IO email lists I belong to. This problem does not seem to be affecting the email lists I belong to that are not hosted by Groups.IO. How can I fix this problem so that any messages I send to this list will also appear in my In Box? By coincidence, this started happening after I clicked on the Mute Thread link at the bottom of a message sent by Brian Nogel a few days ago, so I'm wondering whether doing this is now somehow blocking all messages I send to this list and the 3 other groups.io lists I belong to from appearing in my In Box. Thanks for any help.

Gerald



-----Original Message----- From: Armando
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2016 6:26 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Did This Message Get Through?

It went through.
----
Sent from a BrailleNote Apex Running Keysoft 9.5 build 1280

--------------------------------
Armando: Admin/owner of the Technology For The Blind Mailing
List.
Want to talk about the BrailleNote Apex and everything
technology? Subscribe to this list that I had created to discuss
the BrailleNote Apex and everything technology!
To subscribe to the list, send a blank email to
techfortheblind+subscribe@groups.io

Note: The Technology For The Blind List requires new subscribers
to be approved and email messages being approved or rejected.

You can also subscribe to the blind-chat group I had created.
This group is for general chat, which means that
if you are blind, you can join this group!
To subscribe, send a blank email to
blind-chat+subscribe@groups.io
--------------------------------

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gerald Levy" <bwaylimited@...
To: jfw@groups.io
Date sent: Sun, 07 Feb 2016 17:49:03 -0500
Subject: Did This Message Get Through?


Can somebody let me know whether they received this message?
Thanks.

Gerald







Re: Moving bard mobile bookbs with dropbox.

brian albriton
 

If you have books from bard you’ve moved to dropbox, choose the share option for each title and share with BARD Mobile.

Like other, It end to just download directly using the BARD Mobile app.

Brian

 

 

From: Carliss [mailto:seejesus@...]
Sent: Saturday, February 06, 2016 9:15 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Moving bard mobile bookbs with dropbox.

 

Listers,

I think I'm getting some where now.

Okay, both computer and tablet dropboxes has the titles of the books.The instructions says, double tap the book title and downloading should start for that book. I went back and checked the titles and one said trantsferring, I hope thats a good thing.  Is it alright to have more than one book trantsferring?

 

 

Carliss


Re: Did This Message Get Through?

Gerald Levy
 

Okay, so my messages are being received by other list members. But for some reason, they are suddenly not showing up in my WLM 2012 In Box. Everything was working fine a few days ago, and now I am suddenly not getting my sent messages in my In Box. I am having the same problem with the three other Groups.IO email lists I belong to. This problem does not seem to be affecting the email lists I belong to that are not hosted by Groups.IO. How can I fix this problem so that any messages I send to this list will also appear in my In Box? By coincidence, this started happening after I clicked on the Mute Thread link at the bottom of a message sent by Brian Nogel a few days ago, so I'm wondering whether doing this is now somehow blocking all messages I send to this list and the 3 other groups.io lists I belong to from appearing in my In Box. Thanks for any help.

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Armando
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2016 6:26 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Did This Message Get Through?

It went through.
----
Sent from a BrailleNote Apex Running Keysoft 9.5 build 1280

--------------------------------
Armando: Admin/owner of the Technology For The Blind Mailing
List.
Want to talk about the BrailleNote Apex and everything
technology? Subscribe to this list that I had created to discuss
the BrailleNote Apex and everything technology!
To subscribe to the list, send a blank email to
techfortheblind+subscribe@groups.io

Note: The Technology For The Blind List requires new subscribers
to be approved and email messages being approved or rejected.

You can also subscribe to the blind-chat group I had created.
This group is for general chat, which means that
if you are blind, you can join this group!
To subscribe, send a blank email to
blind-chat+subscribe@groups.io
--------------------------------

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gerald Levy" <bwaylimited@...
To: jfw@groups.io
Date sent: Sun, 07 Feb 2016 17:49:03 -0500
Subject: Did This Message Get Through?


Can somebody let me know whether they received this message?
Thanks.

Gerald