Date   

Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

 

On Tue, Feb 2, 2016 at 01:02 pm, Mario <mrb620@...> wrote:
concerning step 1, is the built in backup utility sufficient?

 That depends on who you ask.  The more I learn the more I think that a third party tool, and there are several excellent products that are no cost to home users, is the better way to go.  These seem to pose both less frustration and greater ease in the situation where you'd need to restore.

I have been using the new built-in File History feature on Windows 10 along with a third party product.  In the event I need to get something back I don't want to rely on File History alone until I'm certain File History alone is absolutely reliable for user data files.  System images are still done "the old fashioned way" under Windows 10 and the Microsoft boot recovery from system image has been well-known for its unreliability, which is a shame.  The MS system image creation also does a full system image, including all accounts and data files, and you cannot select anything specific to recover - it's an all or nothing affair.  I prefer to have a full system image of the OS alone, separate from the user data files, and a user data file backup that allows me to control what I want to "bring back" more easily in the unfortunate circumstance of a full system crash.

Brian


Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

 

On Tue, Feb 2, 2016 at 12:54 pm, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:
Also, if you're upgrading from Windows 7, run the tool on the Freedom Scientific website that removes old versions of JAWS. This will remove the mirror drivers. These are not needed in Windows 8.1 or 10, and they will actually cause problems in win 10.

 Londa,

            Thanks very much for this info.  I have not upgraded any JAWS users I work with to Windows 10, and would be really hesitant to do so with anyone on Windows 7 in particular.  I had no idea these issues existed.

            When Windows 8 came out it was, as far as I am concerned, a tectonic shift in the Windows user interface.  A great many of the things that had "gone autopilot" decades ago for long-time Windows users disappeared and the learning curve was significant and sometimes painful.  While Windows 10 brings back a number of things, most notably the Start Menu, that Windows 8 did away with the switch to the tile-based start menu is still a big difference.  It's also a grand PITA to put shortcuts on your desktop compared to Win7 and earlier (or at least via the method I'd always used).

Brian


Re: Question about JAWS and Taxes

Dave...
 

Only way I know is an OCR program. 

Dave Carlson
Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 2, 2016, at 11:09, Dennis Clark <dennis@...> wrote:

Hello Aaron,
When doing your own taxes, how do you handle printed forms sent to you for taxes. Each year we receive a number of 1099 forms, and as I recall, Turbo tax will ask for example, "enter the dollar amounts from lines 10, 14 and 20. I've been puzzled what I could do to use TurboTax without a reader, because I don't know in advance which of the many dollar amounts on such forms will be requested. Your advice and experience would be very appreciated.
All the best,
Dennis
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 10:26 AM
Subject: Re: Question about JAWS and Taxes

I have been able to complete and file my personal income taxes using the browser-based version of TurboTax for several years now. Some years I have found it to be less accessible than others, but this year I didn’t encounter any problems using JAWS/Firefox.

 

https://turbotax.intuit.com/

 

Regards,

Aaron M. Page, B.S.

EIT Accessibility Specialist

Accessible Technology Services, University of Montana

Phone: (406) 243-2082

E-mail: aaron.page@...

 

 

From: Walker, Michael E [mailto:michael.e.walker3@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 10:45 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Question about JAWS and Taxes

 

Hi,

 

What have you found to be the most accessible program for filing income taxes with JAWS?

 

Thank you,

Mike


Re: Question about JAWS and Taxes

Walker, Michael E
 

Hi Aaron, Thank you for sharing. I did not think about using Firefox. I will try that. Mike


Re: signatures in pdf form

HH. Smith Jr.
 

Hey Mario,

 

I used an open source software called Inkscape. It does vectoring. I scanned and crop my actual signature then vectored it into a pictorial image of my signature, now I can just insert an actual image of my signature as if I signed the screen with a pen. The website is.

Inkscape.org

You will definitely need sighted assistance.

Here are the instructions I used. The website probably has better or clearer instructions.

How do we add a signature? Well, we could sign our name on a white piece of paper, scan it and just plant that image in Word, right? Not quite. When you scan an image (or take a photo with your iPhone for that matter) you get a JPEG image, and JPEG images do not support transparency.

Here's what a scanned signature looks like right off the scanner:




First thing you'll notice is it's big. If you want your signature to look legit when the document is printed you have to scan it at at least 300
DPI. Your computer screen, however, has a resolution of about 75 DPI normally. So if you add this photo to Word you'll have to re-size it down. The end result is something that looks like this when printed:



Terrible.


First of all, the white background of the signature photo is opaque. As a result the image hides the "Signature" text and the line we're supposed to sign on. We want to somehow make the white areas transparent, so that when we plant the signature onto the page it looks as if it was drawn on by hand, not plastered on with a computer. This can be done with image editing software, such as Paint.NET (free), if you know what you're doing. The resulting image must be saved in a more appropriate image format - one that supports transparency. Best is PNG.


But even that's not enough. The end result, when printed, still looks terribly fake. Here's a close-up version to illustrate:

 


See how pixelated it looks? When you print this on a piece of paper you definitely see the difference. Why is this happening? Didn't we take a hi-res scan of the signature?


Why? Because Word is dumb. When you scan an image in high resolution (e.g. 300 or DPI, same as a good printer) the image you get on your computer is big. When you then resize the image in Word to fit the signature space, Word just prints the picture as it appears on screen (i.e. in 75 DPI). It's not smart enough to say "this picture is scaled down, but I do have the original high-resolution at hand, so I can send it to the printer at 300 DPI".


Also, what if we want to print at 600 DPI, but our scanned image is just in 300 DPI? Ideally we'd want a
vector image of our signature, not a raster image. Vector graphics nowadays is usually saved in the popular (and open) SVG format. And you can find services online that will try to convert a raster image (e.g. jpg) to SVG. Only one problem with this: Word can't handle SVG. So there's one more hoop to jump through.

Here's what you need to do to take a scanned image of a signature and convert it to something you can actually add to Word. You need just one application - it's called
Inkscape and it's a totally free vector graphics application.

  1. Take a white A4 paper and put your signature on it using a nice, thick pen.
  2. Scan it at 300 DPI (grey-scale is fine, too).
  3. Crop out everything but the signature. This can usually be done in the scanner program itself if you do a pre-scan. But you can also do it with MS Paint.
  4. Save it as JPG.
  5. Open Inkscape.
  6. Drag and drop your scanned JPG into Inkscape.
  7. Select the image in Inkscape and choose Path -> Trace Bitmap from the menu.
  8. Use "Brightness Cutoff" with a high threshold (over 0.9) and press Ok.
  9. It will create a vector version of the signature and place it directly above the image. Drag it away to see the difference between the two.
  10. Feel free to play with the threshold until you get a good reproduction of the original image.
  11. Now select the original image and delete it (DEL).
  12. Select the good vector version and do File -> Document Properties -> Fit page to selection.
  13. Now save as EMF.
  14. You can now drag and drop this EMF into Word. Make sure the Text Wrap property of the image in Word is set to "In Front of Text" and then just place it over the signature space.

Here's a close-up of the raster vs. vector images side by side in Inkscape:

 

 



Here's just one letter scaled way up, just so you see how good the vector version is:



And here's what it looks like in Word:



Keep that EMF file at hand. No more printing, faxing and scanning.



 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mario [mailto:mrb620@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 4:46 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: signatures in pdf form

 

I have a pdf form that needs to be filled in, including signatures. I am using acrobat reader dc and I am able to fillin name, address, city, state, zip, etc, but what about signatures? how can this be done?

 

I haven't got any idea, except to have my signature digitally scanned or photoed, cropped, and inserted, but have no idea as to successfully do this. help!

 

 

 

 

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

Mario
 

thanks Brian, so, it's a little simpler. thank goodness.
concerning step 1, is the built in backup utility sufficient?

On 2/2/2016 3:16 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Mario,

No. Reserving a copy of Win10 originally was about having
the entire set of necessary files (or most of 'em, anyway) be downloaded
to your machine ahead of time so you could do the update process with
less wait time. Now Microsoft seems to be doing that as a part of GWX
by default, angering any number of people who think it's a conspiracy of
some sort.

If you have a Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 computer no product
key is necessary and none is sent to you afterward. The upgrade process
itself activates your copy of Windows 10 on the machine and it's
licensing key.

What I recommend as the "safe upgrade procedure" is as follows:

1. Make a full backup of your existing user data and full OS system
image of your Windows 7 or Windows 8 system using the backup software of
your choice. In the event of something catastrophic occurring, which is
unlikely, this is the easiest way to recover your existing system.

2. Run the Windows 10 Upgrade process. I suggest doing it either from
GWX or from the "Upgrade this PC Now" option on the media creation tool
page if your intention is to upgrade the PC you're currently on. If you
really must have the Win10 ISO burned to disc or on USB, then follow the
instructions regarding downloading it for upgrading PCs other than the
one you're on. If you go that route you'll also need to go into BIOS or
use the Boot Order panel to make your computer boot from the media you
created to do the upgrade.

a. IF your system was a "well used" system, and
particularly a well-used Windows 7 system (or even just a Windows 7
system, if you want to be anal-retentive about it) then immediately go
to the Update & Security Settings, Recovery Pane and do a "Reset this
PC" via the button. This forces a full refresh of the Win10 operating
system. Use the "Keep my files" option, at least initially.

b. If you have a Win8.1 system, you can probably skip what
was done in step 'a' for a Windows 7 system. If you notice that you're
having irregularities within the first couple of days I'd give a Reset
install a try then, but only if something weird appears to be happening.

3. Take the time to go through the Privacy Settings, all panes, to set
things up as you'd like as far as device access and data gathering. I
have shut down a lot of default access, but left system health reporting
at "full" and there is not much traffic from that.

4. If you are on an internet connection that has data caps and/or peak
and off peak usage periods and billing, definitely take the time open
the Network & Internet Settings, WiFi Pane (which happens to be the
default when N&I Settings open), then click on the WiFi connection
(probably that you're currently connected to). Then scroll down below
the list of WiFi connections to find the "Advanced Options" link. Be
certain to throw the Metered Connections switch/toggle (I can't remember
how JAWS announces it, because it's a new concept, maybe as a checkbox.
It behaves the same way) to "ON." This prevents Windows Updates from
automatically downloading via this particular internet connection
without your express permission to do so. Otherwise, leave this set to
"OFF" so that Windows Updates remain fully automatic. Also, in the
Advanced Options is a switch/toggle entitled "Make this PC
Discoverable." This serves the same purpose as the old "What type of
network is this? Home/Work/Public" stuff did in Windows 7. Since both
Home and Work networks in the old system made the computer discoverable
by other Windows machines on the same network, that split has been
eliminated. If you switch Discoverable to ON your computer is visible
to others on the network and can share like you may have done in the
past. If it's OFF it's the same as the former "Public" choice, and your
machine is visible via WIndows to no other machine on the network.

5. Set up Cortana to your liking. I absolutely hate having Web results
returned as parts of a Windows search, so I turned the "Search Online
and include Web Results" setting off. I had no intention of using the
digital assistant feature to interact with Cortana verbally, so I turned
off the "Cortana can give you suggestions, reminders, ideas, alerts, and
more" setting OFF, too. The digital assistant feature is quite
remarkable, and I've played with it when setting up machines for others,
but I know I won't use it. I also hate the fact that Cortana is stapped
to Bing as far as searching for web results because I've just never
warmed to Bing and won't at this point.

Brian


Re: How Can Sighted People Tell Where I Am At on a Screen in JAWS?

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

I think it’s usually turned on by default.

 

From: Bill White [mailto:billwhite92701@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 30, 2016 10:16 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How Can Sighted People Tell Where I Am At on a Screen in JAWS?

 

Another setting which will assist sighted people to know where JAWS is on the screen is "Show Virtual Viewer On Screen". This setting is in the Basics menu of JAWS options.

Bill White billwhite92701@...

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, January 30, 2016 6:48 AM

Subject: How Can Sighted People Tell Where I Am At on a Screen in JAWS?

 

Hi!

 

From time to time, especially on the Internet, I will ask a sighted person to look at something with me.  They always say that although they can of course hear what JAWS is reading, they cannot see where on the screen this is.  Sometimes, somehow perhaps related, JAWS might even be reading something that is really not even visible on the screen; like scrolling is not happening.

 

Is there some way or JAWS option to show exactly where on the screen JAWS is?  Ideally, this would be something readily visible so sighted people could see where I am at on the screen.  Additionally, ideally the screen would scroll along with the application (like a webpage).

 

Thanks,

Richard



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12952 (20160130) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

Londa Peterson
 

 Once the upgrade is done, it is also a good idea to uninstall JAWS and then reinstall it. Also, if you're upgrading from Windows 7, run the tool on the Freedom Scientific website that removes old versions of JAWS. This will remove the mirror drivers. These are not needed in Windows 8.1 or 10, and they will actually cause problems in win 10. Hope this helps.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 3:17 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

 

Mario,

          No.  Reserving a copy of Win10 originally was about having the entire set of necessary files (or most of 'em, anyway) be downloaded to your machine ahead of time so you could do the update process with less wait time.  Now Microsoft seems to be doing that as a part of GWX by default, angering any number of people who think it's a conspiracy of some sort.

          If you have a Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 computer no product key is necessary and none is sent to you afterward.  The upgrade process itself activates your copy of Windows 10 on the machine and it's licensing key.

          What I recommend as the "safe upgrade procedure" is as follows:

1.  Make a full backup of your existing user data and full OS system image of your Windows 7 or Windows 8 system using the backup software of your choice.  In the event of something catastrophic occurring, which is unlikely, this is the easiest way to recover your existing system.

2.  Run the Windows 10 Upgrade process.  I suggest doing it either from GWX or from the "Upgrade this PC Now" option on the media creation tool page if your intention is to upgrade the PC you're currently on.  If you really must have the Win10 ISO burned to disc or on USB, then follow the instructions regarding downloading it for upgrading PCs other than the one you're on.  If you go that route you'll also need to go into BIOS or use the Boot Order panel to make your computer boot from the media you created to do the upgrade.

            a.  IF your system was a "well used" system, and particularly a well-used Windows 7 system (or even just a Windows 7 system, if you want to be anal-retentive about it) then immediately go to the Update & Security Settings, Recovery Pane and do a "Reset this PC" via the button.  This forces a full refresh of the Win10 operating system.  Use the "Keep my files" option, at least initially.

            b. If you have a Win8.1 system, you can probably skip what was done in step 'a' for a Windows 7 system.  If you notice that you're having irregularities within the first couple of days I'd give a Reset install a try then, but only if something weird appears to be happening.

3. Take the time to go through the Privacy Settings, all panes, to set things up as you'd like as far as device access and data gathering.  I have shut down a lot of default access, but left system health reporting at "full" and there is not much traffic from that.

4. If you are on an internet connection that has data caps and/or peak and off peak usage periods and billing, definitely take the time open the Network & Internet Settings, WiFi Pane (which happens to be the default when N&I Settings open), then click on the WiFi connection (probably that you're currently connected to).  Then scroll down below the list of WiFi connections to find the "Advanced Options" link.  Be certain to throw the Metered Connections switch/toggle (I can't remember how JAWS announces it, because it's a new concept, maybe as a checkbox.  It behaves the same way) to "ON."  This prevents Windows Updates from automatically downloading via this particular internet connection without your express permission to do so.  Otherwise, leave this set to "OFF" so that Windows Updates remain fully automatic.   Also, in the Advanced Options is a switch/toggle entitled "Make this PC Discoverable."  This serves the same purpose as the old "What type of network is this? Home/Work/Public" stuff did in Windows 7.  Since both Home and Work networks in the old system made the computer discoverable by other Windows machines on the same network, that split has been eliminated.  If you switch Discoverable to ON your computer is visible to others on the network and can share like you may have done in the past.  If it's OFF it's the same as the former "Public" choice, and your machine is visible via WIndows to no other machine on the network.

5.  Set up Cortana to your liking.  I absolutely hate having Web results returned as parts of a Windows search, so I turned the "Search Online and include Web Results" setting off.  I had no intention of using the digital assistant feature to interact with Cortana verbally, so I turned off the "Cortana can give you suggestions, reminders, ideas, alerts, and more" setting OFF, too.  The digital assistant feature is quite remarkable, and I've played with it when setting up machines for others, but I know I won't use it.  I also hate the fact that Cortana is stapped to Bing as far as searching for web results because I've just never warmed to Bing and won't at this point.

Brian


signatures in pdf form

Mario
 

I have a pdf form that needs to be filled in, including signatures. I am using acrobat reader dc and I am able to fillin name, address, city, state, zip, etc, but what about signatures? how can this be done?

I haven't got any idea, except to have my signature digitally scanned or photoed, cropped, and inserted, but have no idea as to successfully do this. help!


Re: Tweaking OS Settings on Windows 10

HH. Smith Jr.
 

They are all about just the same.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 4:22 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Tweaking OS Settings on Windows 10

 

Just a quick note, but for anyone who doesn't know it the good, old fashioned Control Panel is still available on Windows 10, so if you know how to tweak a setting in Windows 7 or Windows 8 via Control Panel odds are very, very good that it will still be available in Windows 10 via Control Panel.

The new native Windows 10 Settings system app has a really nice new feature, the ability to search for a given setting using what you'd probably expect as a "normal human" as the search term(s).  I find this really handy for obscure settings I've dealt with ages ago but have no idea where I found them.  But for the really familiar things I am far more likely to just use Control Panel.

Brian

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Hello All,

            I actually got a reply from the Accuplacer folks today with an attachment that they claim is an accessible version of the document Pablo mentioned back in December.    I have uploaded same to my Google Drive and you can get it by clicking here if you'd like to play with it to see how accessible it actually is.

            If anyone has trouble with downloading from Google Drive and wants a copy please send me an e-mail or private message and I'd be happy to send it to you via e-mail attachment.

Brian


Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

When I pressed Alt-W, it put me in the To field, as if I'd have pressed
Control-F.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 2:36 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

This doesn't work with win 7.



From: Kevin Wollenweber [mailto:dancingweed@optonline.net]
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 2:22 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Sending an email as a attachment?



If you press ALT and W, this will set up your email to forward whatever
email you are trying to forward. What will next come up is the field for
you to fill in the email address of the person to whom you are sending
the forwarded email.



I hope this helps.



Kevin


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paign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
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Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

What is the difference in pressing Alt-W and Control-F?

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Wollenweber [mailto:dancingweed@optonline.net]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 2:22 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

If you press ALT and W, this will set up your email to forward whatever
email you are trying to forward. What will next come up is the field for
you to fill in the email address of the person to whom you are sending
the forwarded email.



I hope this helps.



Kevin


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Tweaking OS Settings on Windows 10

 

Just a quick note, but for anyone who doesn't know it the good, old fashioned Control Panel is still available on Windows 10, so if you know how to tweak a setting in Windows 7 or Windows 8 via Control Panel odds are very, very good that it will still be available in Windows 10 via Control Panel.

The new native Windows 10 Settings system app has a really nice new feature, the ability to search for a given setting using what you'd probably expect as a "normal human" as the search term(s).  I find this really handy for obscure settings I've dealt with ages ago but have no idea where I found them.  But for the really familiar things I am far more likely to just use Control Panel.

Brian


Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

 

Mario,

          No.  Reserving a copy of Win10 originally was about having the entire set of necessary files (or most of 'em, anyway) be downloaded to your machine ahead of time so you could do the update process with less wait time.  Now Microsoft seems to be doing that as a part of GWX by default, angering any number of people who think it's a conspiracy of some sort.

          If you have a Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 computer no product key is necessary and none is sent to you afterward.  The upgrade process itself activates your copy of Windows 10 on the machine and it's licensing key.

          What I recommend as the "safe upgrade procedure" is as follows:

1.  Make a full backup of your existing user data and full OS system image of your Windows 7 or Windows 8 system using the backup software of your choice.  In the event of something catastrophic occurring, which is unlikely, this is the easiest way to recover your existing system.

2.  Run the Windows 10 Upgrade process.  I suggest doing it either from GWX or from the "Upgrade this PC Now" option on the media creation tool page if your intention is to upgrade the PC you're currently on.  If you really must have the Win10 ISO burned to disc or on USB, then follow the instructions regarding downloading it for upgrading PCs other than the one you're on.  If you go that route you'll also need to go into BIOS or use the Boot Order panel to make your computer boot from the media you created to do the upgrade.

            a.  IF your system was a "well used" system, and particularly a well-used Windows 7 system (or even just a Windows 7 system, if you want to be anal-retentive about it) then immediately go to the Update & Security Settings, Recovery Pane and do a "Reset this PC" via the button.  This forces a full refresh of the Win10 operating system.  Use the "Keep my files" option, at least initially.

            b. If you have a Win8.1 system, you can probably skip what was done in step 'a' for a Windows 7 system.  If you notice that you're having irregularities within the first couple of days I'd give a Reset install a try then, but only if something weird appears to be happening.

3. Take the time to go through the Privacy Settings, all panes, to set things up as you'd like as far as device access and data gathering.  I have shut down a lot of default access, but left system health reporting at "full" and there is not much traffic from that.

4. If you are on an internet connection that has data caps and/or peak and off peak usage periods and billing, definitely take the time open the Network & Internet Settings, WiFi Pane (which happens to be the default when N&I Settings open), then click on the WiFi connection (probably that you're currently connected to).  Then scroll down below the list of WiFi connections to find the "Advanced Options" link.  Be certain to throw the Metered Connections switch/toggle (I can't remember how JAWS announces it, because it's a new concept, maybe as a checkbox.  It behaves the same way) to "ON."  This prevents Windows Updates from automatically downloading via this particular internet connection without your express permission to do so.  Otherwise, leave this set to "OFF" so that Windows Updates remain fully automatic.   Also, in the Advanced Options is a switch/toggle entitled "Make this PC Discoverable."  This serves the same purpose as the old "What type of network is this? Home/Work/Public" stuff did in Windows 7.  Since both Home and Work networks in the old system made the computer discoverable by other Windows machines on the same network, that split has been eliminated.  If you switch Discoverable to ON your computer is visible to others on the network and can share like you may have done in the past.  If it's OFF it's the same as the former "Public" choice, and your machine is visible via WIndows to no other machine on the network.

5.  Set up Cortana to your liking.  I absolutely hate having Web results returned as parts of a Windows search, so I turned the "Search Online and include Web Results" setting off.  I had no intention of using the digital assistant feature to interact with Cortana verbally, so I turned off the "Cortana can give you suggestions, reminders, ideas, alerts, and more" setting OFF, too.  The digital assistant feature is quite remarkable, and I've played with it when setting up machines for others, but I know I won't use it.  I also hate the fact that Cortana is stapped to Bing as far as searching for web results because I've just never warmed to Bing and won't at this point.

Brian


Re: Question about JAWS and Taxes

Lauren Snyder
 

Can you do federal, state and city on this program? Also, does it allow you to do itemized? I thought of doing it myself this year as the volunteer organization I went to last year messed me up and I am having to communicate with the IRS a lot.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Lauren

 

From: Dave Carlson [mailto:dgcarlson@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 12:56 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Question about JAWS and Taxes

 

VTaxacts

Dave Carlson

Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 2, 2016, at 09:45, Walker, Michael E <michael.e.walker3@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

What have you found to be the most accessible program for filing income taxes with JAWS?

 

Thank you,

Mike


Re: Download Sound In Internet Explorer

Kimber Gardner
 

Thanks for that tip about the asterisk representing the download
sound. I've been through that list of system events at least a half
dozen times and couldn't figure it out.

Kimber

On 2/2/16, HH. Smith Jr. <teos1@islands.vi> wrote:
Hi Guys,



Here are some directions for changing your sound scheme in Windows10. I
found these directions in my library from March of

2013. I tested it on Windows10 and the instructions are still true. These
instructions will also allow to import, export, and modify current sound
scheme. Oh by the way, the download complete sound is represented by the
asterisk in the list of events. It is the second one down from the Windows
open event.



Importing and exporting whole sound schemes

becomes handy if you want to apply your schemes to different computers or
setup your system anew and don’t want to copy the whole Windows theme. Doing
so proves trickier as one might think though, since sound schemes are not
saved as some kind of file or package as one might think.

First off, to create a custom sound scheme, head to the Control Panel and
open the Hardware and Sound Options. In the Sound menu, click on Change
system sounds. Leave the applied scheme as it is and instead change its
components by selecting one of the listed items and browsing for a new sound
file, which has to be in the .wav format. For simplicity’s sake, put all
your custom sound files into the C:\Windows\Media folder prior to setting
them since they have to be in the exact same folder on the system you import
them.

After you have applied new sounds for all the items you want to change,
click the Save as… button and give your scheme a name.

Afterwards, to export the scheme open the Windows registry – do so by
opening a Run… prompt (Windows + R) and entering regedit. In the left
registry panel, browse for the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\AppEvents key. Right-click
it and select Export to save its contents somewhere on your hard drive. Put
the exported registry file and all the custom sound files you used on a USB
key or another device to transfer the files.

After you have got the registry file as well as the sound files you used on
the other system, put the sound files in the exact same folder as they were
on the first system (if you followed this guide, it is C:\Windows\Media).
Then double-click the registry file to add the first system’s sound scheme
settings to the new one (schemes are only added, non will be removed if
there were custom schemes installed before). The sound scheme should now be
available in the Control Panel.



Note: if you just want to modify one or two events, it is best to go to
sounds in the control panel and change them without creating a whole new
sound scheme.

From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 2:04 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Download Sound In Internet Explorer



Bro,



I know you're using Windows 10 so, I don't have a clue as how you assign
sounds to the different tasks. In Windows 7 it's a major pain in the a** to
get a personal sound scheme setup to your personal liking. It took me a lot
of time to get my personal scheme setup, & explaining how I got it done
would take forever especially since I added many of my own sounds.



Take care.
Mike
Global warming? Most likely caused from hot air generated by politicians!

----- Original Message -----

From: Kimsan <mailto:kimsansong@outlook.com>

To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>

Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 9:24 PM

Subject: Re: Download Sound In Internet Explorer



Ok, bro.



We got sounds turned on so now how do we get sounds for the different events
to occur.



Work your magic for the list hoo deennie!



From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2016 3:29 PM
To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Re: Download Sound In Internet Explorer



Hi Jim,

I need to 1st preface these steps by stating that I'm running Windows 7 Pro
64 bit, IE11, & Jaws 16 & 17, but IE11 should be the same in Windows 8:



You might not have sounds turned on so, therefore you won't hear it or, the
sound might be 1 that's hard to hear. So, you assign a different sound to
the,
Notify task in your Sound Scheme. Below are steps on turning on sounds.

To get sounds In IE11:



With IE11 open, press ,control + J, to open the View Downloads dialog. Tab
to the options link, press the spacebar, tab and when you hear notify
me when download is complete, hit spacebar to check the checkbox. tab to &
Okay the choice. If the, control + J, keystroke doesn't work, try pressing,
Alt + T, to open the tools menu, arrow down to, View Downloads, & press
enter to open the View Downloads dialog.

In Internet Explorer 11 there is the option of playing system sounds, These
sounds include a sound to Notify you when your downloads are complete
By default the system sounds & Notify when download is complete options are
off. To turn them on:
1. On the tools menu, choose internet options.

2. In the dialog ctrl+tab until you get to the advanced page.

3. In the settings tree view, in the accessibility group, there's the item
play system sounds-off. You can quickly move to this by pressing the letter
p. Press spacebar, and the item changes to play system sounds-on.

4. Now press the letter, N, to, Notify when downloads complete-OFF. Press
the spacebar to toggle this to, ON.



5. press enter to press the default ok button to save your changes & close
Tools / Options.

Take care.
Mike
Global warming? Most likely caused from hot air generated by politicians!

----- Original Message -----

From: Bill White <mailto:billwhite92701@dslextreme.com>

To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>

Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 1:56 PM

Subject: Re: Download Sound In Internet Explorer



Hi, Jim. If you go to Internet Explorer Options, go to the Advanced
settings, you will be able to tab to a tree view. Once you get to this tree
view, arrow down to an entry which says something like:



System Sounds On

or

System Sounds Off



If it says System Sounds Off, Press the space bar to turn them on, tab to
Apply, then tab to OK and press the Enter key.



Hope this helps you.



Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com
<mailto:billwhite92701@dslextreme.com>

----- Original Message -----

From: HAMILTON <mailto:jim.hamilton@rogers.com>

To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>

Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 9:52 AM

Subject: Re: Download Sound In Internet Explorer



HI: Using Windows 8.1 and JAWS 17: To turn on sounds in IE 11, I tried both
methods, 1) going to the "advance" tab under "options" when in IE11, and 2)
pressing ctrl+j when IE11 first opens. In neither instance did I find
anything about "sound". Please be more specific; or, tell me what I may be
doing wrong. Thanks. Jim H



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
database 12961 (20160201) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com





--
Kimberly


Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

 

Carliss,

           As you've seen from a lot of the responses most of the time the impulse is just to forward the message itself, but I know that's not what you're looking to do.  Forwarding a message as an attachment allows the recipient of that message to essentially treat it as though it were sent directly to them without the intermediate forward from you.

           This help page from the Department of Agricultural Sciences at Penn State entitled, How to Use Outlook 2007's Forward as Attachment, gives you exactly the information you're looking for.  I have no doubt that the necessary JAWS access elements will be obvious to you and, if not, toss out those questions next.

Brian


Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

judith bron
 

This doesn’t work with win 7.

 

From: Kevin Wollenweber [mailto:dancingweed@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 2:22 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

 

If you press ALT and W, this will set up your email to forward whatever email you are trying to forward.  What will next come up is the field for you to fill in the email address of the person to whom you are sending the forwarded email.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Kevin

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

A forward is not an attachment. An attachment is a separate file which you can save on your computer, outside of the email client you are using.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 11:22 AM
Subject: Re: Sending an email as a attachment?

If you press ALT and W, this will set up your email to forward whatever email you are trying to forward.  What will next come up is the field for you to fill in the email address of the person to whom you are sending the forwarded email.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Kevin

This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12966 (20160202) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12966 (20160202) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com