Date   

Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Mario
 

ditto. yay Brian.

On 1/8/2016 11:48 PM, Robin Frost wrote:
Your explanation is very well put and confirms that which I thought
about you truly having the gift of the heart of a teacher which is
different than merely knowing something.
Yay you!
Robin
*From:* Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Friday, January 8, 2016 11:44 PM
*To:* jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps,
emphasize when teaching

Thanks to all for this fascinating exchange of ideas.

Laura, your question is not in any way dumb and it is very difficult to
answer easily. It's relatively easy for me to know the difference
because I can literally see the Windows keyboard shortcuts "reveal
themselves" as the sequences are hit, at least a large number of them.
I certainly, for instance, didn't know the keyboard sequence that was
used in Windows Live Mail to do a message search in its entirety,
particularly the ALT+i for the find now key, but as I work through the
process the first time with the client at each step Windows (or the
Windows program) shows the next character or characters that are part of
the sequence, allowing me to build the entire sequence for inclusion in
the step-by-step directions.

I am glad, though, to hear others saying that it is important to make
this distinction. The main reason it's important to me is that there is
a huge set of Windows keyboard shortcuts, the three best known being
Ctrl+C (copy), Ctrl+X (cut), and Ctrl+V (paste), that are used in
precisely the same manner in more programs than I can count. There are
many more that fall into the "extended common" set of Windows keyboard
shortcuts and I want my clients to understand that, if they're in a
pinch, and they know how to do "process X" in "program Y" that they
should at least try seeing if "process X" will get the same result in
different Windows "program Z."

The same concept applies to the JAWS layer as well, since you use the
same JAWS keyboard shortcuts to accomplish the same tasks in a wide
array of Windows programs.

If you know the difference between the two, though, and you have that
knowledge "in your bones" you can actually sometimes function if speech
goes south at a given point in time and still complete at least the
current thing you're trying to do like save a file.

Another reason it's important to know the difference is because
sometimes assistive technology like JAWS, ZoomText, or the like
"captures" what would be a Windows keyboard shortcut for it's own use.
My client gave an example of this last night, that he'd figured out on
his own. He generally uses either ZoomText or JAWS (much more JAWS
these days) separately along with whatever Windows program he needs
beneath it. The other day he had ZoomText, plus JAWS, plus some Windows
program open. One of the commands that we always used to perform a
function in that Windows program when JAWS was running alone suddenly
wasn't working in the Windows program, and ZoomText was doing something
he'd never seen before. He figured out for himself that ZoomText had
commandeered that particular command for its own use and, thus, was not
passed along to the Windows program running beneath it for processing.

I use the analogy of the various programs being like separate sifting
screens stacked one atop the other. The screen readers and other
assistive technology are always the topmost screen. They get every
blessed keystroke you hit passed through them first, and these programs
get to interpret those first, so if a keystroke sequence is considered a
command by JAWS, for instance, JAWS does it's thing with that sequence
and nothing from it sifts through to the program that is "the next
sifting screen down." Then, all of the keystroke sequences that JAWS
didn't snag as its own get passed down to the next sifting screen, and
for the purposes of this narrative lets say that's ZoomText. Now
ZoomText gets "first crack" at interpreting the sequences that have
passed into its hands, and acts on any of those it recognizes as "my
command." Then whatever is left sifts through and falls into the screen
that is the Windows program running below it for interpretation as
commands it processes. I think it's important for people to understand
that there exists a hierarchy and that AT sits at the top of that heap
and gets first crack at every keyboard input sequence to decide if it
"belongs to me" before passing what remains on to the next guy. Very
often this may be irrelevant to doing what you want to do, but it can be
key to understanding why "things that used to work" may work no longer
if some other AT program gets added to the mix that ends up siphoning
off commands that used to be passed through to other programs, so those
other programs never see them.

Heavens, but the above seems awfully wordy, but I really can't think of
a short way to describe the conceptual framework of program layers and
that knowing about it can make sudden changes in behavior on your system
a bit more understandable when new stuff enters the mix of programs
running at the same time.

Brian


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 
Edited

On Fri, Jan 8, 2016 at 08:58 pm, Dale Alton wrote:
I feel if it is a windows command it will make some thing change in windows and not make jaws work.

 Dale,

           And in that simple statement you are completely correct, and vice versa.   However, Freedom Scientific documents a number of Windows keyboard shortcuts in their own JAWS keystrokes document without ever differentiating, clouding the water.  Some have already been mentioned, but just looking quickly at the JAWS 15 Keystrokes document, here are a few examples of Windows keyboard shortcuts included in it without mention that they are not, really, JAWS commands:

TAB and SHIFT+TAB to move back and forth between different areas in a Windows Explorer window

CTRL+T to open a new tab in a web browser

CTRL+W to close a tab in a web browser

CTRL+TAB to shift to the next tab in a web browser  

CTRL+9 to shift to the last tab in the web browser

and there are probably more.  One could argue that these are not Windows keyboard shortcuts, but keyboard shortcuts specific to web browsers for the last three, but what they are certainly not is a JAWS keystroke.

I think others have actually confirmed what I had hoped would be confirmed in terms of what I select to teach and how, and that is that it is important to be able to understand, at a minimum, that there is a distinct difference between JAWS control keystrokes and Windows program control keystrokes.  You pointed out that critical difference, and there are times when understanding it can save a person a world of heartache.


Re: need guidance on navigating in windows 10

Negoslav Sabev
 

Perhaps this will help.

Negoslav Sabev

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 9, 2016, at 5:18 AM, "Barbara Hansen" <the2skibears@...> wrote:

Hello all,

 

I believe that a while back, someone indicated that there was information regarding optimizing computer using JAWS for making windows 10 more user friendly. If so, please share this again.

 

Many thanks,

 

Barbara Hansen

 


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Kelly Pierce
 

Brian,

Yes, windows shortcuts are important, but accessibility and
productivity for a blind person relies on being familiar with the JAWS
shortcuts and those built into a particular software application.
After learning a few dozen, I know of no blind end user that can
manage hundreds of keyboard shortcuts in their head. I believe
Microsoft Word has more than 1,000 keyboard shortcuts. It would be an
unreasonable expectation for a blind person to memorize most of these.
Students should be exposed to the JAWS help system that contains
useful information about how to optimize accessibility for a specific
program and how to bring up the menus of JAWS specific keyboard
shortcuts for that program. Often, knowing how to learn is more
important than memorizing the sequences in the accessibility recipes
you provided. This is similar for a blind person in learning to only
travel a specific route from one location to another rather than
learning the general skills of how to travel to any location. In
teaching route travel, the blind person is dependent on the trainer to
constantly teach new routes as their live and personal situations
change.

I do a lot of advocacy projects and find that many people who say they
have accessibility barriers to software or information have received
formal technology access training and some have technology
backgrounds. Yet, few have reviewed the JAWS help system, listened to
the free training tutorials from Freedom Scientific, or searched
online for a solution. I know because I am able to quickly identify a
solution to their access problem that is found in these resources,
showing the person that the issue is their lack of knowledge rather
than one of asserting civil rights.

Kelly

On 1/9/16, Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@gmail.com> wrote:
I think companies should encourage a no-mouse week in their offices! That
would be great! Of course, there would need to be some exceptions, but the
improvements in productivity over time are immeasurable!

-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 1:42
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Hi Brian,
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key

commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode. You do not have to use
the num pad at all when using JAWS, because key commands have been added to

JAWS which makes it possible to not have a num pad at all. For example, caps

lock + K will read the current word as well as num pad 5. It is good to know

the difference between windows and JAWS key commands, because you can
perform a lot of tasks, like saving a file, without speech if you know the
command. Just think, sighted people would greatly benefit by knowing all of

the Windows key commands, because it is much faster to press a key command
then it is working with the mouse. I have shown many of my sighted friends
and my wife many key commands and they use some like alt + tab. Take care
and have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that
you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key
from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will

get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when
teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly

has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more
personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and

its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and

assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as

many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to

universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that,

in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S

saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring
session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as
using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still
get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks
step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which
will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the

phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows
keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic

understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS

versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of
same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by

extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to
him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to
not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that
also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love

to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of
leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few
moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange
Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with

that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard
shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of
narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an
image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not exactly,

like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its

name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re

dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the

following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first
character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange
Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time
this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not
read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with star

after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or

phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to find.

Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible

attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From,

To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you
wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in whichever are
pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box

to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if

any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but

are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.
When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through them, hit
ENTER to open it.













Outlook 2016 Issue

Cindy Ray <cindyray@...>
 

I am using Windows 10, Outlook 2016, and JAWS17. I have set up some folders, originally hoping that I could get messages to go there. I never did, but I could move things to those folders, thus not having so much in my in-box. Now I can read the folders, but I can’t enter any of them, nor can I enter my Spam folder, sent folder—none of them. I was wondering what I ought to be checking to see what is wrong. I’ve heard some messages come in that I can’t find; I’m not seeing messages from people I know have sent me some. It is wearing out my patience.

Thanks for your help.

Cindy Lou Ray

 


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2016 at 10:42 pm, David Moore wrote:
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode.

 David,

        Just based upon my years of teaching JAWS now I have to say the answer to this is really a "yes, and no" proposition.  I could never figure out why the laptop keyboard commands never worked on any laptop any client of mine had.  It was only very recently, because of a conversation off-forum with a member, that I learned that the laptop versus desktop keyboard is a setting you can tweak and that you could, for instance, force a desktop to use laptop commands if you had learned JAWS using only laptop commands on a number-pad-less laptop.  I had originally thought that JAWS would do hardware detection to determine the keyboard layout, and perhaps it does, but I have not dealt with a laptop larger than a netbook that does not come equipped with a full keyboard with number pad in I don't know how long.  Every laptop I've ever tutored with uses the desktop keystrokes.  I make the client aware that the laptop keystrokes exist and explain the situation in which their use becomes necessary, but that's it.  I do not attempt to instruct using them because the machine they use, and probably most of the machines they will ever use, will not use those keystrokes.

          I have yet to see JAWS being used on either a tablet or touch screen laptop.  If my clients ask me for purchasing advice with regard to a laptop, I suggest that they do not go the touch screen route because so many unintended accidents can occur if they, or far more likely, their sighted helpers, begin touching the screen when pointing to it or dragging their finger down the screen (possibly closing a program), etc.

          I am soon to have the novel experience of teaching someone how to use VoiceOver on a Macbook.  I'm very rusty on VoiceOver to begin with, and I have never dealt with it except on touch devices like an iPad and an iPhone.  Trying to do VoiceOver "on a big screen" using a mouse pad will be a real learning experience for all involved!

Brian


Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

Mike B <mb69mach1@...>
 


IE11 freezing up, is 1 of the similarities it does not share with IE10.  LOL 
Take care.
Mike
Global warming?  Most likely caused from hot air generated by politicians!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 10:45 PM
Subject: Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

Hi,
I have used IE 11 for a year and a half, and it is just as accessible as IE 10. It works almost exactly the same. It is so similar, that FS never did a webinar on IE 11. It freezes up, and that is why I use Firefox or Chrome much more than IE. However, there are sites that work best if you use IE 11, so it is good to have it. IE 11 is accessible. Have a great one.
 
 
From: Tom Behler
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10
 

So, then, I’m stuck with IE 11 if it successfully installs, even though it may result in lessened accessibility in comparison to IE 10?

 

Am using Jaws 16 and windows 7 here.

 

Tom Behler

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 6:38 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

 

Tom,

           Since IE is closely integrated into the Windows operating system there cannot be two versions of that software on a single machine at the same time.  As Adrian has noted if an IE11 install fails the typical result is an automatic rollback to whatever version of IE you had on your machine before attempting to install it.

Brian


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

I think companies should encourage a no-mouse week in their offices! That would be great! Of course, there would need to be some exceptions, but the improvements in productivity over time are immeasurable!

-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 1:42
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hi Brian,
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key
commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode. You do not have to use
the num pad at all when using JAWS, because key commands have been added to
JAWS which makes it possible to not have a num pad at all. For example, caps
lock + K will read the current word as well as num pad 5. It is good to know
the difference between windows and JAWS key commands, because you can
perform a lot of tasks, like saving a file, without speech if you know the
command. Just think, sighted people would greatly benefit by knowing all of
the Windows key commands, because it is much faster to press a key command
then it is working with the mouse. I have shown many of my sighted friends
and my wife many key commands and they use some like alt + tab. Take care
and have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that
you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key
from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will
get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when
teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly
has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more
personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and
its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and
assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as
many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to
universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that,
in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S
saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring
session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as
using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still
get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks
step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which
will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the
phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows
keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic
understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS
versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of
same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by
extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to
him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to
not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that
also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love
to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of
leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few
moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange
Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with
that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard
shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of
narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an
image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not exactly,
like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its
name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the
following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first
character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time
this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not
read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with star
after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or
phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to find.
Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible
attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From,
To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you
wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in whichever are
pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box
to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if
any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but
are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.
When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through them, hit
ENTER to open it.


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

But, while you are "playing around," make absolutely certain not to press, say Windows Key L. This is especially important if you have six files open, and there was not time to save any of them. Yes, that is an exaggerated example, but...

-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Alton [mailto:blinkydale@comcast.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 23:58
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

I have to put my 2 cents worth in now. I feel some of the comments have been flagarently
Wrong. I feel if it is a windows command it will make some thing change in winodows and not make jaws work. For example if you press "windows key+e" it opens the windows explorer but jaws just speaks what it opens. When you press a jaws command it tells jaws to do a specific command. If it doesn't tell jaws to do some thing then it has to be windows. I can't think of a jaws command that might be mistaken for a windows command. If it envovles the number pad you know it isn't windows but jaws. If causes the computer to do some thing it is windows. Play around what's the worse that is going to happen? You learn your computer better?s
Denver Dale


-----Original Message-----
From: Gary King [mailto:w4wkz@bellsouth.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 9:42 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Well, right after I posted the below message, I thought of exceptions to the
rule. Quick Keys in browsers are JAWS keystrokes that don't have the JAWS
Key in combination with them. So, I guess you could say that it's a general
rule with some exceptions. I think it's still a good rule though for
telling JAWS keystrokes from Windows keystrokes.

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gary King" <w4wkz@bellsouth.net>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 10:28 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching


Laura,
Windows keystrokes do not involve the JAWS Key, while JAWS keystrokes do.
Can anyone think of exceptions?

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laura Richardson" <laurakr65@gmail.com>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 9:05 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching


Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I�ll ask it anyway ...... When
using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I
know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7
and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working
in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know
JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn
to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when
teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that
certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot
more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and
its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs
and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to
know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or
very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want
them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or
equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring
session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as
using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still
get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks
step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which
will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used
the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows
keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a
basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program
layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the
interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows
keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows
program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this
distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS
keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a
different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of
those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few
moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange
Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play
with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard
shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of
narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an
image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not
exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear
its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do
the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first
character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange
Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time
this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not
read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with
star after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s
done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words,
or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to
find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of
possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g.,
Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these
attributes you wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in
whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog
box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched
on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message
list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you
entered. When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through
them, hit ENTER to open it.













Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

If he is interested is something like this, I wonder if something like Insert Z would help him?

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 23:44
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

Thanks to all for this fascinating exchange of ideas.

Laura, your question is not in any way dumb and it is very difficult to answer easily.  It's relatively easy for me to know the difference because I can literally see the Windows keyboard shortcuts "reveal themselves" as the sequences are hit, at least a large number of them.  I certainly, for instance, didn't know the keyboard sequence that was used in Windows Live Mail to do a message search in its entirety, particularly the ALT+i for the find now key, but as I work through the process the first time with the client at each step Windows (or the Windows program) shows the next character or characters that are part of the sequence, allowing me to build the entire sequence for inclusion in the step-by-step directions.

I am glad, though, to hear others saying that it is important to make this distinction.  The main reason it's important to me is that there is a huge set of Windows keyboard shortcuts, the three best known being Ctrl+C (copy), Ctrl+X (cut), and Ctrl+V (paste), that are used in precisely the same manner in more programs than I can count.  There are many more that fall into the "extended common" set of Windows keyboard shortcuts and I want my clients to understand that, if they're in a pinch, and they know how to do "process X" in "program Y" that they should at least try seeing if "process X" will get the same result in different Windows "program Z."

The same concept applies to the JAWS layer as well, since you use the same JAWS keyboard shortcuts to accomplish the same tasks in a wide array of Windows programs.

If you know the difference between the two, though, and you have that knowledge "in your bones" you can actually sometimes function if speech goes south at a given point in time and still complete at least the current thing you're trying to do like save a file.

Another reason it's important to know the difference is because sometimes assistive technology like JAWS, ZoomText, or the like "captures" what would be a Windows keyboard shortcut for it's own use.  My client gave an example of this last night, that he'd figured out on his own.  He generally uses either ZoomText or JAWS (much more JAWS these days) separately along with whatever Windows program he needs beneath it.  The other day he had ZoomText, plus JAWS, plus some Windows program open.  One of the commands that we always used to perform a function in that Windows program when JAWS was running alone suddenly wasn't working in the Windows program, and ZoomText was doing something he'd never seen before.  He figured out for himself that ZoomText had commandeered that particular command for its own use and, thus, was not passed along to the Windows program running beneath it for processing.

I use the analogy of the various programs being like separate sifting screens stacked one atop the other.  The screen readers and other assistive technology are always the topmost screen.  They get every blessed keystroke you hit passed through them first, and these programs get to interpret those first, so if a keystroke sequence is considered a command by JAWS, for instance, JAWS does it's thing with that sequence and nothing from it sifts through to the program that is "the next sifting screen down."  Then, all of the keystroke sequences that JAWS didn't snag as its own get passed down to the next sifting screen, and for the purposes of this narrative lets say that's ZoomText.  Now ZoomText gets "first crack" at interpreting the sequences that have passed into its hands, and acts on any of those it recognizes as "my command."  Then whatever is left sifts through and falls into the screen that is the Windows program running below it for interpretation as commands it processes.  I think it's important for people to understand that there exists a hierarchy and that AT sits at the top of that heap and gets first crack at every keyboard input sequence to decide if it "belongs to me" before passing what remains on to the next guy.  Very often this may be irrelevant to doing what you want to do, but it can be key to understanding why "things that used to work" may work no longer if some other AT program gets added to the mix that ends up siphoning off commands that used to be passed through to other programs, so those other programs never see them.

Heavens, but the above seems awfully wordy, but I really can't think of a short way to describe the conceptual framework of program layers and that knowing about it can make sudden changes in behavior on your system a bit more understandable when new stuff enters the mix of programs running at the same time.

Brian 


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

Hello Gary,

Insert F7, to display a list of links, is still a JAWS-specific command. In order for it to work in another ScreenReader, it has to be added into their keyboard layer. I know this because it will not work when using Narrator with Internet Explorer. Of course, you can make it work with Window-Eyes, and unless I am much mistaken, it works with NVDA right from the word go.

Have a great weekend!

Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Gary King [mailto:w4wkz@bellsouth.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 23:42
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Well, right after I posted the below message, I thought of exceptions to the
rule. Quick Keys in browsers are JAWS keystrokes that don't have the JAWS
Key in combination with them. So, I guess you could say that it's a general
rule with some exceptions. I think it's still a good rule though for
telling JAWS keystrokes from Windows keystrokes.

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gary King" <w4wkz@bellsouth.net>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 10:28 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching


Laura,
Windows keystrokes do not involve the JAWS Key, while JAWS keystrokes do.
Can anyone think of exceptions?

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laura Richardson" <laurakr65@gmail.com>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 9:05 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching


Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I�ll ask it anyway ...... When
using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I
know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7
and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working
in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know
JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn
to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when
teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that
certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot
more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and
its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs
and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to
know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or
very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want
them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or
equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring
session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as
using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still
get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks
step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which
will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used
the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows
keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a
basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program
layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the
interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows
keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows
program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this
distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS
keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a
different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of
those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few
moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange
Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play
with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard
shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of
narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an
image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not
exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear
its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do
the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first
character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange
Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time
this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not
read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with
star after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s
done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words,
or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to
find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of
possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g.,
Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these
attributes you wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in
whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog
box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched
on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message
list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you
entered. When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through
them, hit ENTER to open it.













Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

Good early morning Laura!

The good people on here are not going to call--or think--that you are dumb. Generally, JAWS key strokes utilize the insert key, (which is the zero on the numb-pad when the numb-lock function is off). If you are using the laptop layout, than most often the JAWS-specific key strokes are performed while using the caps-lock key. Their use of the insert key is so prevalent that Freedom Scientific refers to it almost exclusively as "the JAWS key." I am very thankful, and much more grateful than I can say, that nobody here does that nonsense! Hallelujah! Okay, rant over...

Have a great weekend!

Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 22:06
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I�ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with star after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

David Moore
 

Hi,
I have used IE 11 for a year and a half, and it is just as accessible as IE 10. It works almost exactly the same. It is so similar, that FS never did a webinar on IE 11. It freezes up, and that is why I use Firefox or Chrome much more than IE. However, there are sites that work best if you use IE 11, so it is good to have it. IE 11 is accessible. Have a great one.
 
 

From: Tom Behler
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10
 

So, then, I’m stuck with IE 11 if it successfully installs, even though it may result in lessened accessibility in comparison to IE 10?

 

Am using Jaws 16 and windows 7 here.

 

Tom Behler

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 6:38 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

 

Tom,

           Since IE is closely integrated into the Windows operating system there cannot be two versions of that software on a single machine at the same time.  As Adrian has noted if an IE11 install fails the typical result is an automatic rollback to whatever version of IE you had on your machine before attempting to install it.

Brian


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

David Moore
 

Hi Brian,
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode. You do not have to use the num pad at all when using JAWS, because key commands have been added to JAWS which makes it possible to not have a num pad at all. For example, caps lock + K will read the current word as well as num pad 5. It is good to know the difference between windows and JAWS key commands, because you can perform a lot of tasks, like saving a file, without speech if you know the command. Just think, sighted people would greatly benefit by knowing all of the Windows key commands, because it is much faster to press a key command then it is working with the mouse. I have shown many of my sighted friends and my wife many key commands and they use some like alt + tab. Take care and have a great one.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Re: Problem installing IE11

Adrian Spratt
 

As a rule, you're right. Sadly, saving and installing from the saved file made no difference in this case.

-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 5:08 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Problem installing IE11

Hi,
Never choose run! Try doing it again, and choose the save as option and save
the install file to your computer. Then, just go to that file on your
computer and press enter and follow the instructions. That will work every
time. Every time I have tried to run a program from the web page, I have run
into the same problems you are having. Have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Kimber Gardner
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:35 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Problem installing IE11

Hi Adrian,

I don't know how to fix your problem. But what I would do is call the
microsoft help desk for users with disabilities. I've gotten help from
them before and it worked out well. Here's the number if you want to
go that way.

1-800-936-5900

Good luck.

Kimber

On 1/8/16, Adrian Spratt <Adrian@adrianspratt.com> wrote:
In light of MS's abandonment of IE10, I tried to upgrade to IE11 this
morning. From what I can tell, the process is easy with JAWS so long as
you
don't encounter problems. However, I did, and I'm at a loss.

The IE11 download link for Win7-64 bit systems is
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/Internet-Explorer-11-for-Windows-7-details.aspx

In this case, I selected the "run" option, and the download went smoothly.
However, as installation started, JAWS verbalized something to the effect
that not all files had previously been installed. (the wording is
important,
but I neglected to take a note.) At the halfway point, the installation
stopped and I was directed to a new trouble-shooting icon on my desktop.
Clicking on this icon took me to an MS help page. Among other things, the
page lists a series of files that must be installed before IE11. I went
through the entire list. Most files were either already on my system or
weren't appropriate for it, according to the messages I received as I
initiated each download.

Everything else seemed in order on the trouble-shooting page except for
one
item that I don't know how to look into. This is that the video card may
be
incompatible. I had IE11 on my system until Wednesday, when a tech support
guy trying to fix a problem convinced me to roll back to IE10. So, on the
face of it, my video card should be compatible. However, is it possible
that
it has become incompatible since IE11 was initially installed two or three
years ago? If so, any ideas how I can fix it?

Second question. The only file that wasn't already on my system was not a
prerequisite, but a recommended option. I installed it, then rebooted my
PC
(which, by the way, still didn't solve the IE11 problem). This is the MS
description on that trouble-shooting page:

Download x64 package for the 64-bit version of Windows
An update is available for the ASLR feature in Windows 7 or in Windows
Server 2008 R2 This update introduces the Force ASLR (Address Space
Layout Randomization) feature. This is an addition to the ASLR feature for
Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.
I have no idea what this feature is or does. Can anyone tell me? should I
not have installed it?

Sorry for such a long post and complicated query. But perhaps others on
the
list will be attempting to install IE11 before next Tuesday, and so any
answers may help more than one of us.

--
Kimberly


Re: Problem installing IE11

Adrian Spratt
 

Mike, good advice. Unfortunately, in that it didn’t solve the problem, this was done. Also, we made an attempt to install from a saved file.

 

From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 5:20 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Problem installing IE11

 

Hi Adrian,

 

If you try to install IE11 from a downloaded executable / installer, install it as Administrator.  With installer highlighted press the applications key, arrow down to, Administrator, & press enter.  I don't know if this will work any better than not installing as Administrator but, anything is worth a shot at this point.

Take care.
Mike

----- Original Message -----

From: David Moore

Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 2:07 PM

Subject: Re: Problem installing IE11

 

Hi,
Never choose run! Try doing it again, and choose the save as option and save
the install file to your computer. Then, just go to that file on your
computer and press enter and follow the instructions. That will work every
time. Every time I have tried to run a program from the web page, I have run
into the same problems you are having. Have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Kimber Gardner
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:35 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Problem installing IE11

Hi Adrian,

I don't know how to fix your problem. But what I would do is call the
microsoft help desk for users with disabilities. I've gotten help from
them before and it worked out well. Here's the number if you want to
go that way.

1-800-936-5900

Good luck.

Kimber

On 1/8/16, Adrian Spratt <Adrian@...> wrote:
> In light of MS's abandonment of IE10, I tried to upgrade to IE11 this
> morning. From what I can tell, the process is easy with JAWS so long as
> you
> don't encounter problems. However, I did, and I'm at a loss.
>
> The IE11 download link for Win7-64 bit systems is
> https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/Internet-Explorer-11-for-Windows-7-details.aspx
>
> In this case, I selected the "run" option, and the download went smoothly.
> However, as installation started, JAWS verbalized something to the effect
> that not all files had previously been installed. (the wording is
> important,
> but I neglected to take a note.) At the halfway point, the installation
> stopped and I was directed to a new trouble-shooting icon on my desktop.
> Clicking on this icon took me to an MS help page. Among other things, the
> page lists a series of files that must be installed before IE11. I went
> through the entire list. Most files were either already on my system or
> weren't appropriate for it, according to the messages I received as I
> initiated each download.
>
> Everything else seemed in order on the trouble-shooting page except for
> one
> item that I don't know how to look into. This is that the video card may
> be
> incompatible. I had IE11 on my system until Wednesday, when a tech support
> guy trying to fix a problem convinced me to roll back to IE10. So, on the
> face of it, my video card should be compatible. However, is it possible
> that
> it has become incompatible since IE11 was initially installed two or three
> years ago? If so, any ideas how I can fix it?
>
> Second question. The only file that wasn't already on my system was not a
> prerequisite, but a recommended option. I installed it, then rebooted my
> PC
> (which, by the way, still didn't solve the IE11 problem). This is the MS
> description on that trouble-shooting page:
>
> Download x64 package for the 64-bit version of Windows
> An update is available for the ASLR feature in Windows 7 or in Windows
> Server 2008 R2       This update introduces the Force ASLR (Address Space
> Layout Randomization) feature. This is an addition to the ASLR feature for
> Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.
> I have no idea what this feature is or does. Can anyone tell me? should I
> not have installed it?
>
> Sorry for such a long post and complicated query. But perhaps others on
> the
> list will be attempting to install IE11 before next Tuesday, and so any
> answers may help more than one of us.
>


--
Kimberly





Re: IE11 installation saga

Adrian Spratt
 

James, this is the best overview I’ve come across of what went wrong, and it may help me going forward. Thanks.

 

From: James Homuth [mailto:james@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 6:51 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: IE11 installation saga

 

It sounds like what might have happened is something went whacky when IE 10 was installed. Here's the typical situation. Tech support removes IE 11, so Windows 7 automaticly rolls you back to IE 8--the first version of IE 7 ships with. Then IE 10 gets installed, probably manually, as Windows update will want to launch you straight into IE 11 (it did for me a couple days ago). So the way I'd get around it were I you is to uninstall IE 10, let Windows roll you back to IE 8, then try to install IE 11. Hopefully in doing so, whatever whackyness is happening with 10 will have been preemptively undone.

 

Relatedly, this is also why you won't see an IE 8 installer for Windows 7, or presumedly an IE 11 installer for windows 8.1 or 10. That version ships with Windows, so you can just remove it by going into that version of Windows's equivalent of "turn Windows features on or off". It essentially performs the same tasks. I agree Microsoft should make a stand-alone installer available, but that's never happened and won't ever happen--it's why you won't find IE in, say, the ninite installer package (I've never seen it there, and I've used that utility for years).

 


From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: January-08-16 5:32 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: IE11 installation saga

Hi. I’ve received several queries off-list about my experience attempting to upgrade from IE10 to IE11. I’m about to describe an immensely frustrating day with no end in sight, but I want to begin by emphasizing that accessibility is not an issue and that you have nothing to lose by trying.

 

So, I start with the good news. I downloaded IE11 via the link I posted earlier. Here it is again:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/Internet-Explorer-11-for-Windows-7-details.aspx

 

I note that Mario provides a link to what may be a different page that intrigues me, but I think in my case I’m way beyond taking advantage of it.

 

In any event, to resume the good story. After downloading IE11, which I did from the “run” rather than the “save” dialog, the program began installation. I’m confident that had it not encountered some as-yet undetermined problem, the installation would have completed fine, my machine would have rebooted, perhaps there would have been a long delay as Windows reconfigured, but ultimately the machine would have returned in good health and with IE11 running.

 

In short, don’t go by the rest of my experience. If IE11 doesn’t install, you lose nothing. IE10 continues to work fine, and your system shouldn’t otherwise be affected.

 

Okay, now for the saga. Kimber was kind enough to post a reminder of the Microsoft Accessibility number, so I called. During the course of two hours, the rep repeated everything I’d done on my own and came to the same point. She added a system check and, although I had some difficulty understanding her (she kept speaking away from the mouthpiece), I believe she also did a repair of IE. The next step, she said, was to run a repair of Windows, and if that failed to reinstall Windows. At that point, I said I’d call my own tech support guy, in whom I have complete faith. Naturally, he’s a busy man and he doesn’t come cheap, but I thought this problem would be routine for MS to fix.

 

Note. The MS Accessibility person failed to disconnect when we hung up, and she also left my system at the administrator level rather than the one I normally use. The only way I found to disconnect was to reboot. My first Microsoft Accessibility experience wasn’t encouraging, but I know many of you have had much better results there.

 

My tech guy repeated the same procedures, but he added at least one. In addition to downloading from what I believe was the same MS webpage I used, he tried installing via Windows Updates. Whereas I’d gone as far as 45%, as did the Microsoft person, he got to 75% before MS sent a message to the effect, “too bad.”

 

I then suggested a system restore. Now here, I have to go back to Wednesday, when the problem started. I’ve been having a problem with certain webpages at my investment broker’s website, and so we set up a tech support session for that day. They made two mistakes, looking back from this vantage point. First, they assured me that IE10 had the same level and duration of support as IE11, which was the only reason I agreed to let them roll my system back to IE10. (they were running IE10 and not experiencing the same problem I had.) As an aside, it was based on that assurance that I posted my optimistic IE10 message here later that day. As we all know now, support for IE10 actually expires next Tuesday.

 

Second, in order to fix a problem that came up (they inadvertently installed IE8 rather than IE10), my investment broker tech guys used a restore point. A restore point prior to Wednesday would have been a potential lifesaver today, but the only ones I have now go back only as far as yesterday.

 

So, big caveat: Don’t trust tech support staff who want to meddle with your system. This has been my longstanding rule, and to the extent I violate it, I try to keep on top of what they’re doing and refuse to let them go ahead if I have any doubts. I trusted these guys.

 

The net result of my experience today, leading into the weekend, is that while downloading went fine from several sources, installation kept failing and no one can figure out why. Five hours on the phone, none of my own work done, and I don’t have a solution.

 


Re: more about New York Times and Jaws

Adrian Spratt
 

Point well taken. I had a related experience earlier this week. Unable to read the content of a certain window, I was flummoxed until I remembered I’d turned off in-line frames. Regrettably, turning them back on didn’t solve the problem, which remains an unsolved mystery.

 

From: Gary King [mailto:w4wkz@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 11:17 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: more about New York Times and Jaws

 

I want to issue a warning about turning off in-line frames.  I suggest that you only do so in the Personalize Web Settings section of the Quick Settings Tree View.  Otherwise you may be turning off this option for all web pages which is not such a good idea, as I found out the hard way.  There can sometimes be important information in those frames.

 

I tried checking into my local bank's web page early this week and couldn't find the log-in form.  I called the bank to see if they had a problem.  Well, it turned out that it was me that had a problem, and it was of my own making.  Their log-in form was in a frame, and when I turned off in-line frames, it disappeared.

 

Since my other screen readers still detected the frame containing the form, I knew that JAWS was at fault.  After thinking about changes I had made to JAWS recently, I had the clue to the mystery.

 

Gary King
w4wkz@...

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2015 9:46 AM

Subject: more about New York Times and Jaws

 

Listers: Jaws 16, Windows 7 and Chrome

 

Here is what I have done so far to help in reading NYT articles:

 

1. I have set a placemarker tagged to the text “Share this Page”. Thus in articles I can hit K then N to get to the start of most articles (may have to repeat sometimes).

2. Thanks to help from Adrian I have turned automatic refresh to off.

3. I have turned in-line frames off.

 

Are there other settings or tricks to make article reading in NYT have a more uninterrupted flow?

 

Stan

 


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Debbie Kessler
 

It's not so much not knowing one or the other but rather knowing how to distinguish jaws keystrokes from the windows once.

DjAndChaz
Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 8, 2016, at 5:40 PM, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Dale Alton <blinkydale@...>
 

I have to put my 2 cents worth in now. I feel some of the comments have been flagarently
Wrong. I feel if it is a windows command it will make some thing change in winodows and not make jaws work. For example if you press "windows key+e" it opens the windows explorer but jaws just speaks what it opens. When you press a jaws command it tells jaws to do a specific command. If it doesn't tell jaws to do some thing then it has to be windows. I can't think of a jaws command that might be mistaken for a windows command. If it envovles the number pad you know it isn't windows but jaws. If causes the computer to do some thing it is windows. Play around what's the worse that is going to happen? You learn your computer better?s
Denver Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: Gary King [mailto:w4wkz@bellsouth.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 9:42 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Well, right after I posted the below message, I thought of exceptions to the
rule. Quick Keys in browsers are JAWS keystrokes that don't have the JAWS
Key in combination with them. So, I guess you could say that it's a general
rule with some exceptions. I think it's still a good rule though for
telling JAWS keystrokes from Windows keystrokes.

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gary King" <w4wkz@bellsouth.net>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 10:28 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching


Laura,
Windows keystrokes do not involve the JAWS Key, while JAWS keystrokes do.
Can anyone think of exceptions?

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laura Richardson" <laurakr65@gmail.com>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 9:05 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching


Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When
using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I
know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7
and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working
in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know
JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn
to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when
teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that
certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot
more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and
its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs
and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to
know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or
very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want
them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or
equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring
session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as
using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still
get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks
step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which
will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used
the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows
keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a
basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program
layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the
interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows
keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows
program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this
distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS
keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a
different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of
those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few
moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange
Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play
with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard
shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of
narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an
image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not
exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear
its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do
the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first
character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange
Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time
this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not
read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with
star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s
done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words,
or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to
find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of
possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g.,
Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these
attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in
whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog
box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched
on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message
list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you
entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through
them, hit ENTER to open it.