Date   

Re: FS Reader and Daisy Books

Elise Berkley
 

Thank you for this info. You just reminded me of FS training pages/webinars. I always forget about this useful resource.
Elise


Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

Mario
 

yes, you will need IE even if you don't ever use it. IE 11 will override 10. it maybe a little convoluted and even maybe unnecessary, but I'd uninstall Java and Flash before upgrading to IE 11. I'd also disable, and even try to remove, any addons, accellerators and other junk that appears in the addons manager. this will give you a lickity split experience. IE 10 didn't have any cruft (junk), why should 11? and you may have to uninstall any other program the IE 11 installation might ask you to remove. then reinstall Flash and Java after a reboot.

If you should have to go back to IE 10, uninstalling 11 should roll you back with no problem.

On 1/8/2016 6:34 PM, Tom Behler wrote:
Hello, everyone.

With the ending of Microsoft support for IE 10, I’m planning to upgrade
to IE 11 soon, perhaps as early as sometime this week-end.

However, in light of problems that Adrian and others have had with the
upgrade, I must ask a question.

If I upgrade to IE 11, does that over-write IE 10, or will IE 10 still
be on my machine, if I need to go back to it for some reason? This is
obviously not what I would like to do, but I just want to be sure the
option is there if needed.

I have been using Firefox more and more as my main internet browser, but
still would like to have IE handy as a backup.

One of these days, I’ll try google chrome, but it may be a while yet
until I get the time to do so.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Maria Campbell
 

I ALSO BELIEVE IN VARIOUS METHODS, BE IT MENUS, SHORTCUTS, SCREEN READERS, ETC. WHATEVER EACH PERSON BECOMES COMFORTABLE WITH IS WHAT HE/SHE WILL STICK WITH. WE HAVE ALL LEARNED THAT THERE ARE MULTIPLE WAYS OF DOING THE SAME THING ANYWAY. GETTING IT DONE IS WHAT COUNTS, NOT NECESSARILY HOW IT IS DONE. SORRY ABOUT THE CAPS LOCK.

On 1/8/2016 7:02 PM, Mario wrote:
Brian, I believe it is important that a student focus on using the non
JAWS specific commands because there are programs that are inaccessible
and another solution like NVDA might work better, or how will the
student cope if JAWS should become catatonic? they need to be able to
cope with sticky situations when they arise.

I'd like to hear what others have to say in response to your post... or
mine.

On 1/8/2016 6:12 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that
certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a
lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS
and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows
programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my
clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are
universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows
programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens
the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A
does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour
tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail
as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image
PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through
certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format,
examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing
afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking
about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it
important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard
shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows
program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to
understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when
he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this
a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus
nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also
exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love
to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of
leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single
steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done
in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with
PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have
decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on
using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS
serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this. For
some reason the copy and paste from Word for the second two sets of
instructions are not carrying over the numbers, and the forum is being
cranky about allowing me to edit them.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


*/Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is
an image PDF, step-by-step:/*

1.Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly,
like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear
its name announced.

10.Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file
at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a.If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first
character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER
to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends
on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the
processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after
it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file
itself.

14.Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



*/Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:/*

1.Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you
wish to create the new folder.

2.Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------



*/To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:/*

1.Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3.Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or
phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to
find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible
attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject,
From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these
attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in
whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box
to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched
on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message
list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria
you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move
through them, hit ENTER to open it.


--

Sunny Day
Maria Campbell
lucky1@ct.metrocast.net

Be patient with God: Be patient with yourself: Be patient with others.


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Mario
 

Brian, I believe it is important that a student focus on using the non JAWS specific commands because there are programs that are inaccessible and another solution like NVDA might work better, or how will the student cope if JAWS should become catatonic? they need to be able to cope with sticky situations when they arise.

I'd like to hear what others have to say in response to your post... or mine.

On 1/8/2016 6:12 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that
certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a
lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS
and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows
programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my
clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are
universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows
programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens
the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A
does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour
tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail
as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image
PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through
certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format,
examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing
afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking
about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it
important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard
shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows
program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to
understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when
he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this
a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus
nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also
exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love
to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of
leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single
steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done
in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with
PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have
decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on
using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS
serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this. For
some reason the copy and paste from Word for the second two sets of
instructions are not carrying over the numbers, and the forum is being
cranky about allowing me to edit them.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*/Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is
an image PDF, step-by-step:/*

1.Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly,
like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear
its name announced.

10.Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file
at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a.If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first
character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER
to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends
on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the
processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after
it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file
itself.

14.Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


*/Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:/*

1.Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you
wish to create the new folder.

2.Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


*/To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:/*

1.Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3.Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or
phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to
find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible
attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject,
From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these
attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in
whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box
to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched
on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message
list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria
you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move
through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Jason White
 

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@gmail.com> wrote:

Other folks may want to explore more, and might be required to use multiple
ScreenReaders.
Some of us use multiple operating systems, not just multiple screen readers,
regularly. There are some keyboard conventions which are similar across
graphical applications in Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows and Linux, for example
the keys used for editing and text selection. Text-mode Linux and UNIX are
unique, and deserve to win the award for efficient keyboard operations.

I would rank Microsoft as second best (and the best of the graphical
environments that I've used) with respect to keyboard shortcuts.

For anyone who is going to be independent, knowing how to look up the key
assignments is important. Microsoft provide lists of keyboard shortcuts for
Windows and the various Office applications. In my experience, the letters
chosen as shortcuts for controls in the ribbon are often not mnemonic, unless
I've failed to understand the system, that is.

I'm a strong proponent of learning the fundamentals well, and of empowering
people to read, learn and discover on their own.


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Gudrun Brunot
 

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

Tom Behler
 

So, then, I’m stuck with IE 11 if it successfully installs, even though it may result in lessened accessibility in comparison to IE 10?

 

Am using Jaws 16 and windows 7 here.

 

Tom Behler

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 6:38 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

 

Tom,

           Since IE is closely integrated into the Windows operating system there cannot be two versions of that software on a single machine at the same time.  As Adrian has noted if an IE11 install fails the typical result is an automatic rollback to whatever version of IE you had on your machine before attempting to install it.

Brian


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Robin Frost
 

Hi,
I’m not an educator so perhaps my opinion isn’t worth much here. I for one like to know as many ways to do a thing as possible but I’m geeky and like to play with things and learn. what has this to do with your question you ask? Well I think my answer to your question is perhaps there isn’t as much a right or wrong answer as much as it depends on the specifics of the student in question.  If they’re technically oriented they might appreciate the distinction between whether something is a keystroke coming from Windows versus their screen reader. Others might not care long as they can accomplish that which they want to get done.  I like you think it’s important to learn as much as one can building a strong foundation to one’s structure but not all care about such things they just want their structure to stand and shelter them and they don't much care how it does it (smile).
Good luck and thanks on behalf of everyone as imparting wisdom is truly a gift to the world.
Robin
 
 

Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:12 PM
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching
 

Hello All,

          What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can.  Hence this is the place to ask.

          When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those.  My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs.  I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

          One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way.  As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow.  It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same.  I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him.  Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction?  Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut?  I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

          What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.  Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments.  I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program.  All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.  For some reason the copy and paste from Word for the second two sets of instructions are not carrying over the numbers, and the forum is being cranky about allowing me to edit them.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.     <!--[endif]-->Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.     <!--[endif]-->Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->5.     <!--[endif]-->Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->6.     <!--[endif]-->Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->7.     <!--[endif]-->Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->8.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->9.     <!--[endif]-->Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->10.                        <!--[endif]-->Hit Enter to open the file or folder.  If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11.  Otherwise, do the following

<!--[if !supportLists]-->a.     <!--[endif]-->If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->b.     <!--[endif]-->If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->11.                        <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->12.                        <!--[endif]-->Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.  Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing.  The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed.  JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes.  That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->13.                        <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->14.                        <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.     <!--[endif]-->Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.     <!--[endif]-->Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

<!--[if !supportLists]-->1.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

<!--[if !supportLists]-->2.     <!--[endif]-->You are presented with two choices in this submenu:  Find Text and Find Message.  I will cover each of these briefly.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->3.     <!--[endif]-->Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.  Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->4.     <!--[endif]-->Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others.  Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search.  After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

<!--[if !supportLists]-->5.     <!--[endif]-->Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key.  This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist.  These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.  When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.  


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Jim Portillo
 

Wow!  I love this list because I truly learn something.

I appreciate that keystroke for making a new folder.  Thank you very much!!

 

 

From: Martin Blackwell via Groups.io [mailto:taoman1@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:39 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

Hi,

 

Good post. That’s pretty much what I do as well. I end up teaching a lot more Windows shortcuts than JAWS shortcuts. People want to get things done in their applications. To me, Windows shortcuts are far more likely to be valuable, as I think you are saying. That is not to say that one can ignore JAWS commands though.

 

And I usually teach the Windows shortcut for creating folders (Control Shift N) for recent versions of Windows instead of the menu way.

 

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

          What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can.  Hence this is the place to ask.

          When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those.  My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs.  I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

          One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way.  As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow.  It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same.  I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him.  Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction?  Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut?  I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

          What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.  Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments.  I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program.  All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1.     Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.     Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.     Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.     Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.     Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.     Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.     Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.     Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.     Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10.                        Hit Enter to open the file or folder.  If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11.  Otherwise, do the following

a.     If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.     If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.                        Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.                        Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.  Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing.  The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed.  JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes.  That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.                        Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14.                        Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1.     Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2.     Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.     Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.     Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1.     Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.     You are presented with two choices in this submenu:  Find Text and Find Message.  I will cover each of these briefly.

3.     Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.  Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.     Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others.  Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search.  After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.     Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key.  This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist.  These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.  When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.   


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

Hi Brian,

 

  I apologize for mentioning things Martin had already touched upon.  I had not yet finished reading my E-Mails when I replied to your messages.  I hear you...  But, personally, I absolutely love control shift N!  It's Like, Bang!  Yes!  LOL!

 

Have a wonderful evening!

 

Paul

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 18:52
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

Paul & Martin,

         Thanks for your input.  I had forgotten about CTRL+SHIFT+N.  Windows has a tendency to give way too many ways to accomplish the same tasks, but at least that gives people things to choose from.

         I may bring that command in, too, but I find that this client gets easily overwhelmed when I tell him something along the lines of, "You're going to perform function X, and you can do that this way, that way, or this other way, whichever you prefer."  For some clients that either has them instantly glom on to the technique they like the best or try doing it each way and then sticking with the one they like (at which point I try to note what that is for the specific client).  Others, though, suffer almost instant choice overload.

          Since this client is doing a lot of things that are somewhat menu intensive I've been shifting my own focus that way.  I do need to step back for certain really common functions that can be done with a single combination key press.

Thanks Again,

Brian


Re: IE11 installation saga

James Homuth
 

It sounds like what might have happened is something went whacky when IE 10 was installed. Here's the typical situation. Tech support removes IE 11, so Windows 7 automaticly rolls you back to IE 8--the first version of IE 7 ships with. Then IE 10 gets installed, probably manually, as Windows update will want to launch you straight into IE 11 (it did for me a couple days ago). So the way I'd get around it were I you is to uninstall IE 10, let Windows roll you back to IE 8, then try to install IE 11. Hopefully in doing so, whatever whackyness is happening with 10 will have been preemptively undone.
 
Relatedly, this is also why you won't see an IE 8 installer for Windows 7, or presumedly an IE 11 installer for windows 8.1 or 10. That version ships with Windows, so you can just remove it by going into that version of Windows's equivalent of "turn Windows features on or off". It essentially performs the same tasks. I agree Microsoft should make a stand-alone installer available, but that's never happened and won't ever happen--it's why you won't find IE in, say, the ninite installer package (I've never seen it there, and I've used that utility for years).


From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: January-08-16 5:32 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: IE11 installation saga

Hi. I’ve received several queries off-list about my experience attempting to upgrade from IE10 to IE11. I’m about to describe an immensely frustrating day with no end in sight, but I want to begin by emphasizing that accessibility is not an issue and that you have nothing to lose by trying.

 

So, I start with the good news. I downloaded IE11 via the link I posted earlier. Here it is again:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/Internet-Explorer-11-for-Windows-7-details.aspx

 

I note that Mario provides a link to what may be a different page that intrigues me, but I think in my case I’m way beyond taking advantage of it.

 

In any event, to resume the good story. After downloading IE11, which I did from the “run” rather than the “save” dialog, the program began installation. I’m confident that had it not encountered some as-yet undetermined problem, the installation would have completed fine, my machine would have rebooted, perhaps there would have been a long delay as Windows reconfigured, but ultimately the machine would have returned in good health and with IE11 running.

 

In short, don’t go by the rest of my experience. If IE11 doesn’t install, you lose nothing. IE10 continues to work fine, and your system shouldn’t otherwise be affected.

 

Okay, now for the saga. Kimber was kind enough to post a reminder of the Microsoft Accessibility number, so I called. During the course of two hours, the rep repeated everything I’d done on my own and came to the same point. She added a system check and, although I had some difficulty understanding her (she kept speaking away from the mouthpiece), I believe she also did a repair of IE. The next step, she said, was to run a repair of Windows, and if that failed to reinstall Windows. At that point, I said I’d call my own tech support guy, in whom I have complete faith. Naturally, he’s a busy man and he doesn’t come cheap, but I thought this problem would be routine for MS to fix.

 

Note. The MS Accessibility person failed to disconnect when we hung up, and she also left my system at the administrator level rather than the one I normally use. The only way I found to disconnect was to reboot. My first Microsoft Accessibility experience wasn’t encouraging, but I know many of you have had much better results there.

 

My tech guy repeated the same procedures, but he added at least one. In addition to downloading from what I believe was the same MS webpage I used, he tried installing via Windows Updates. Whereas I’d gone as far as 45%, as did the Microsoft person, he got to 75% before MS sent a message to the effect, “too bad.”

 

I then suggested a system restore. Now here, I have to go back to Wednesday, when the problem started. I’ve been having a problem with certain webpages at my investment broker’s website, and so we set up a tech support session for that day. They made two mistakes, looking back from this vantage point. First, they assured me that IE10 had the same level and duration of support as IE11, which was the only reason I agreed to let them roll my system back to IE10. (they were running IE10 and not experiencing the same problem I had.) As an aside, it was based on that assurance that I posted my optimistic IE10 message here later that day. As we all know now, support for IE10 actually expires next Tuesday.

 

Second, in order to fix a problem that came up (they inadvertently installed IE8 rather than IE10), my investment broker tech guys used a restore point. A restore point prior to Wednesday would have been a potential lifesaver today, but the only ones I have now go back only as far as yesterday.

 

So, big caveat: Don’t trust tech support staff who want to meddle with your system. This has been my longstanding rule, and to the extent I violate it, I try to keep on top of what they’re doing and refuse to let them go ahead if I have any doubts. I trusted these guys.

 

The net result of my experience today, leading into the weekend, is that while downloading went fine from several sources, installation kept failing and no one can figure out why. Five hours on the phone, none of my own work done, and I don’t have a solution.

 


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

Paul & Martin,

         Thanks for your input.  I had forgotten about CTRL+SHIFT+N.  Windows has a tendency to give way too many ways to accomplish the same tasks, but at least that gives people things to choose from.

         I may bring that command in, too, but I find that this client gets easily overwhelmed when I tell him something along the lines of, "You're going to perform function X, and you can do that this way, that way, or this other way, whichever you prefer."  For some clients that either has them instantly glom on to the technique they like the best or try doing it each way and then sticking with the one they like (at which point I try to note what that is for the specific client).  Others, though, suffer almost instant choice overload.

          Since this client is doing a lot of things that are somewhat menu intensive I've been shifting my own focus that way.  I do need to step back for certain really common functions that can be done with a single combination key press.

Thanks Again,

Brian


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

Hello, again, Brian,

 

  In certain programs, such as Microsoft Word and Excel, (specifically versions 10 and earlier), F12 will take a user directly to the Save as dialogue.

 

Bye,

 

Paul

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 18:13
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

          What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can.  Hence this is the place to ask.

          When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those.  My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs.  I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

          One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way.  As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow.  It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same.  I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him.  Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction?  Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut?  I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

          What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.  Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments.  I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program.  All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1.     Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.     Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.     Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.     Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.     Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.     Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.     Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.     Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.     Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10.                        Hit Enter to open the file or folder.  If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11.  Otherwise, do the following

a.     If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.     If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.                        Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.                        Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.  Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing.  The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed.  JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes.  That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.                        Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14.                        Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1.     Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2.     Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.     Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.     Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1.     Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.     You are presented with two choices in this submenu:  Find Text and Find Message.  I will cover each of these briefly.

3.     Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.  Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.     Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others.  Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search.  After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.     Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key.  This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist.  These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.  When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.   


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@...>
 

Hello Brian,

 

  I know in Windows Vista, and 7, control, plus, shift, plus N, as in Nancy, will let you create a new folder while in Windows explorer.  I think your question might need to be answered on a case-by-case basis.  Some folks may want to learn as few key strokes as possible, and so for them, if JAWS is their primary ScreenReader, it could be beneficial for them to learn key strokes within the JAWS program.  Other folks may want to explore more, and might be required to use multiple ScreenReaders.  I personally like to know Windows commands when I can.  I always am amused when I meet a blind person who insists that alt plus M, as in Mike, is a JAWS-specific command.  On the other hand, I wish there were a way to bring Narrator into the System Tray focus during a fresh Windows install.  I hope this helps.

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Paul

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 18:13
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

Hello All,

          What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can.  Hence this is the place to ask.

          When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those.  My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs.  I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

          One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way.  As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow.  It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same.  I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him.  Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction?  Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut?  I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

          What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.  Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments.  I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program.  All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.  For some reason the copy and paste from Word for the second two sets of instructions are not carrying over the numbers, and the forum is being cranky about allowing me to edit them.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1.     Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.     Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.     Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.     Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.     Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.     Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.     Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.     Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.     Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10.                        Hit Enter to open the file or folder.  If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11.  Otherwise, do the following

a.     If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.     If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.                        Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.                        Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.  Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing.  The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed.  JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes.  That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.                        Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14.                        Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1.     Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2.     Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.     Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.     Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1.     Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.     You are presented with two choices in this submenu:  Find Text and Find Message.  I will cover each of these briefly.

3.     Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.  Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.     Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others.  Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search.  After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.     Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key.  This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist.  These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.  When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.   


Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Martin Blackwell
 

Hi,

 

Good post. That’s pretty much what I do as well. I end up teaching a lot more Windows shortcuts than JAWS shortcuts. People want to get things done in their applications. To me, Windows shortcuts are far more likely to be valuable, as I think you are saying. That is not to say that one can ignore JAWS commands though.

 

And I usually teach the Windows shortcut for creating folders (Control Shift N) for recent versions of Windows instead of the menu way.

 

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

          What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can.  Hence this is the place to ask.

          When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those.  My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs.  I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

          One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way.  As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow.  It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same.  I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him.  Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction?  Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut?  I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

          What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.  Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments.  I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program.  All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1.     Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.     Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.     Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.     Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.     Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.     Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.     Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.     Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.     Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10.                        Hit Enter to open the file or folder.  If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11.  Otherwise, do the following

a.     If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.     If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.                        Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.                        Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.  Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing.  The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed.  JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes.  That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.                        Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14.                        Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1.     Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2.     Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.     Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.     Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1.     Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.     You are presented with two choices in this submenu:  Find Text and Find Message.  I will cover each of these briefly.

3.     Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.  Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.     Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others.  Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search.  After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.     Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key.  This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist.  These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.  When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.   


Re: Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

 

Tom,

           Since IE is closely integrated into the Windows operating system there cannot be two versions of that software on a single machine at the same time.  As Adrian has noted if an IE11 install fails the typical result is an automatic rollback to whatever version of IE you had on your machine before attempting to install it.

Brian


Question On Upgradeing to IE 11 from IE 10

Tom Behler
 

Hello, everyone.

 

With the ending of Microsoft support for IE 10, I’m planning to upgrade to IE 11 soon, perhaps as early as sometime this week-end.

 

However, in light of problems that Adrian and others have had with the upgrade, I must ask a question.

 

If I upgrade to IE 11, does that over-write IE 10, or will IE 10 still be on my machine, if I need to go back to it for some reason?  This is obviously not what I would like to do, but I just want to be sure the option is there if needed.

 

I have been using Firefox more and more as my main internet browser, but still would like to have IE handy as a backup.

 

One of these days, I’ll try google chrome, but it may be a while yet until I get the time to do so.

 

Dr.  Tom Behler from Michigan

 


Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 
Edited

Hello All,

          What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can.  Hence this is the place to ask.

          When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those.  My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs.  I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

          One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way.  As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow.  It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same.  I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him.  Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction?  Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut?  I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

          What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.  Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments.  I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program.  All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1.     Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2.     Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3.     Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4.     Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5.     Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6.     Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7.     Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8.     Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9.     Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10.                        Hit Enter to open the file or folder.  If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11.  Otherwise, do the following

a.     If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b.     If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11.                        Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12.                        Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.  Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing.  The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed.  JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes.  That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13.                        Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14.                        Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1.     Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2.     Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3.     Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4.     Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1.     Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2.     You are presented with two choices in this submenu:  Find Text and Find Message.  I will cover each of these briefly.

3.     Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.  Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4.     Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others.  Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search.  After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5.     Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key.  This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist.  These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.  When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.   


Re: IE11 installation saga

Mike B <mb69mach1@...>
 

No not at all, I'm still awake!  LOL  LOL  What a pain in the ass!  I do have 1 suggestion though, you might want to increase your allocation space for System Restore points so you can have more than a few.  When you checked your System Restore points, did you check the box, Choose A Different Restore Point, so more restore points would show than what what is in the initial list?  To get to this checkbox you can shift + tab from the initial list but, if that doesn't bring it up you will have to use the Jaws cursor to find it.
Take care.
Mike

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 2:31 PM
Subject: IE11 installation saga

Hi. I’ve received several queries off-list about my experience attempting to upgrade from IE10 to IE11. I’m about to describe an immensely frustrating day with no end in sight, but I want to begin by emphasizing that accessibility is not an issue and that you have nothing to lose by trying.

 

So, I start with the good news. I downloaded IE11 via the link I posted earlier. Here it is again:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/Internet-Explorer-11-for-Windows-7-details.aspx

 

I note that Mario provides a link to what may be a different page that intrigues me, but I think in my case I’m way beyond taking advantage of it.

 

In any event, to resume the good story. After downloading IE11, which I did from the “run” rather than the “save” dialog, the program began installation. I’m confident that had it not encountered some as-yet undetermined problem, the installation would have completed fine, my machine would have rebooted, perhaps there would have been a long delay as Windows reconfigured, but ultimately the machine would have returned in good health and with IE11 running.

 

In short, don’t go by the rest of my experience. If IE11 doesn’t install, you lose nothing. IE10 continues to work fine, and your system shouldn’t otherwise be affected.

 

Okay, now for the saga. Kimber was kind enough to post a reminder of the Microsoft Accessibility number, so I called. During the course of two hours, the rep repeated everything I’d done on my own and came to the same point. She added a system check and, although I had some difficulty understanding her (she kept speaking away from the mouthpiece), I believe she also did a repair of IE. The next step, she said, was to run a repair of Windows, and if that failed to reinstall Windows. At that point, I said I’d call my own tech support guy, in whom I have complete faith. Naturally, he’s a busy man and he doesn’t come cheap, but I thought this problem would be routine for MS to fix.

 

Note. The MS Accessibility person failed to disconnect when we hung up, and she also left my system at the administrator level rather than the one I normally use. The only way I found to disconnect was to reboot. My first Microsoft Accessibility experience wasn’t encouraging, but I know many of you have had much better results there.

 

My tech guy repeated the same procedures, but he added at least one. In addition to downloading from what I believe was the same MS webpage I used, he tried installing via Windows Updates. Whereas I’d gone as far as 45%, as did the Microsoft person, he got to 75% before MS sent a message to the effect, “too bad.”

 

I then suggested a system restore. Now here, I have to go back to Wednesday, when the problem started. I’ve been having a problem with certain webpages at my investment broker’s website, and so we set up a tech support session for that day. They made two mistakes, looking back from this vantage point. First, they assured me that IE10 had the same level and duration of support as IE11, which was the only reason I agreed to let them roll my system back to IE10. (they were running IE10 and not experiencing the same problem I had.) As an aside, it was based on that assurance that I posted my optimistic IE10 message here later that day. As we all know now, support for IE10 actually expires next Tuesday.

 

Second, in order to fix a problem that came up (they inadvertently installed IE8 rather than IE10), my investment broker tech guys used a restore point. A restore point prior to Wednesday would have been a potential lifesaver today, but the only ones I have now go back only as far as yesterday.

 

So, big caveat: Don’t trust tech support staff who want to meddle with your system. This has been my longstanding rule, and to the extent I violate it, I try to keep on top of what they’re doing and refuse to let them go ahead if I have any doubts. I trusted these guys.

 

The net result of my experience today, leading into the weekend, is that while downloading went fine from several sources, installation kept failing and no one can figure out why. Five hours on the phone, none of my own work done, and I don’t have a solution.

 


Re: Support for Internet Explorer 11 in the Windows 10 Operating System

 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2016 at 02:17 pm, David Moore wrote:
The installer file can be downloaded to one computer, and you can put that exe file onto a flash drive or any external drive and then run that on another computer.

 David,

            It is important to note that the installers can only be downloaded for the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Internet Explorer 11 for Windows 7.  The same facility does not exist for the version of IE11 that runs on Windows 8 and Windows 10.

Brian