Date   

Re: JAWS really acting badly

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

I have some old 2003 files, and thank goodness, so far, I have had no
problem with JAWS 17 with them.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Cristóbal [mailto:crismunoz54@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 4:33 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: JAWS really acting badly

The crashing thing I remember happening a lot with V 15 and especially
JFW 16, but surprisingly enough, V17 for me has so far proven itself to
be quite stable. Both on a Win 7 laptop and Win 8.1 now Win 10 tower. In
fact, I can’t recall the last time Jaws crashed on me with the latest V17
update.



From: Walt Smith [mailto:ka3lists@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 1:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: JAWS really acting badly



Pardon if this has already been discussed, but I'm new to this list as of
today. When I say JAWS, what I'm about to describe is happening with both
JAWS 16 and 17, both with all current updates, on a Windows 7 tower with
all Microsoft updates applied.



First, JAWS periodically and for no apparent reason simply unloads and
(usually) reloads itself. I'll be doing something like opening a web site
in IE 11 and JAWS just goes silent. After a period that can range from
maybe thirty seconds to more than a minute, I'll hear the "JAWS Home Use
Edition" message indicating that JAWS is loading again and when this
takes place, I can then usually see two entries for JAWS in my System
Tray (I've run JAWS from the SysTray for years). Sometimes, though, JAWS
simply dies and remains dead and nothing I do, including pressing the hot
key combinations that I've set up to load both versions of JAWS will
reload the program and I'm totally dead in the water, since even Narrator
won't load -- I suspect because of extremely high memory use. This last
scenario happened to me just this morning when I was loading a scanned
image into the new version of Adobe Acrobat and after I had my sighted
wife come in and help me kill Acrobat, JAWS returned *without* reloading
as described above.



Another issue; and this, I seem to remember, is an oldie; is that when I
close Outlook, it frequently doesn't unload and it restarts. I'm
currently using Office 2003 with all current MS updates and I know I
should upgrade to something more recent because despite the fact that FS
continues to supply scripts for this old Office version, whenever I try
to report this problem, I'm told bluntly that Office 2003 is no longer
supported. Seems that if this is the case, no scripts to use with this
version should be supplied any more. Anyhow, I have a very faint
recollection that this issue of Outlook failing to shut down when Alt+F4
is pressed goes back several years, but I'm wondering if anyone's seeing
this. The ultimate symptom of this failure of Outlook to shut down is
that while it doesn't show in the Task Bar, if I open Task Manager and
tab over to Processes, it's still running.



Much as the thought distresses me, I'm about to the point of making the
best backup I can and then reformatting my C-drive and reinstalling
Windows 7 in hopes that this may at least help out with the issue of JAWS
automatically unloading and reloading itself. When I look at processes
running in Task Manager, there are a couple of generic things that are
using quite a lot of memory (when I say "generic," I'm referring to
processes labeled only svchost.exe for which I can't get further
details).



If anyone has any wisdom to share on any of this, I'd appreciate feedback
as I'm about at my wits' end. Thanks in advance.



--

Walt Smith - Clearwater, FL

ka3agm@... <mailto:ka3agm@...>


MS to cease support for IE 8, 9 and 10 next week

Adrian Spratt
 

What I wrote this morning about IE10 was true at that moment. Then MS announced that it will cease support for IE 8, 9 and 10 on January 12, giving us just one week’s notice. Unbelievable. Here’s an article:

 

http://money.cnn.com/2016/01/06/technology/microsoft-internet-explorer-support/

 

 


Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

 
Edited

One tiny addition to Mr. Moore's URLs.

The one he gave for convert2mp3 lands you on the German language page.  Click here for their English language page.

If these services work for videos of the length you need to extract the audio from they are probably the easiest way to do it.  The link I posted previously is to a How-To-Geek article that goes step-by-step through the process for VLC for video, but not streamed video such as YouTube.  I know it can do that, too, but it would not be a less complicated process.  I don't know how accessible that webpage will be because it uses a lot of screen shots and I didn't take a look at whether there is alternate text or if the accompanying text is detailed enough.  The author does give each and every dialog you need to go through, and it's quite a few of them.



question about subject line

Barbara Hansen <the2skibears@...>
 

Hi group,

 

I just upgraded to windows 10. For some reason my outlook 2010 is not working correctly. In the subject line, I am getting numbers, like 10KB for every message. The numbers vary, I guess depending on length of message. It must have something to do with how messages are viewed.

 

Your assistance would be greatly appreciated.

 

Barbara Hansen

 


Re: Is there a program that converts video files from youtube to mp3 files?

Gudrun Brunot
 

David, try Youtube to Mp3 converter.

http://www.youtube-mp3.org/


Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: David Ingram [mailto:dingram269@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 3:26 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Is there a program that converts video files from youtube to mp3
files?

Hi list members, I'm trying to find a program that converts video files to
mp3 format? Thank you for any information that you might have. Concerning
my question.


Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

David Moore
 

Hi Keith,
There are two websites where you can convert Youtube videos to mp3 audio format. The first:
The second:
I like the second one better, because the video can be longer. The way you use both of these is to play the video on youtube. Press alt + D and ctrl + C to copy the url of the video playing. Then, open up one of these websites, and paste the url in the edit box that you copied from youtube. Then, enter on convert. Within a few seconds, the converted audio will be ready for download. Just download it to your computer. That is it. The second website has converted every video into mp3 for me. Let me know how this works out. There are other free file converters you can ownload as well. They are actual desktop programs. Have a great one.
 

Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?
 

Hi Brian,

 

This is interesting. Can you explain more about how it’s done, or where we can learn to do it? I’m most interested in capturing mp3 files of YouTube videos.

 

Thanks, Keith

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 5:38 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

 

David,

           If you happen to be a VLC Media Player user there is a way to use it to do this. The procedure isn't simple, but extracting the audio from a video probably isn't going to be with any product.

           Also, VLC can be used for saving any audio or video stream (e.g., YouTube). 

Brian


Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

Kramlinger, Keith G., M.D. <kramlinger.keith@...>
 

Hi Brian,

 

This is interesting. Can you explain more about how it’s done, or where we can learn to do it? I’m most interested in capturing mp3 files of YouTube videos.

 

Thanks, Keith

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 5:38 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

 

David,

           If you happen to be a VLC Media Player user there is a way to use it to do this. The procedure isn't simple, but extracting the audio from a video probably isn't going to be with any product.

           Also, VLC can be used for saving any audio or video stream (e.g., YouTube).  

Brian


Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

 

David,

           If you happen to be a VLC Media Player user there is a way to use it to do this. The procedure isn't simple, but extracting the audio from a video probably isn't going to be with any product.

           Also, VLC can be used for saving any audio or video stream (e.g., YouTube).  

Brian


Is there a program that converts video files from youtube to mp3 files?

David Ingram
 

Hi list members, I’m trying to find a program that converts video files to mp3 format?  Thank you for any information that you might have. Concerning my question.


Re: is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

ratshtron <northstar1950@...>
 

i would recommend format factory. its a free software and works quite well for doing what you wish to do.



Legend has it that on Wednesday 1/6/2016 05:12 PM, David Ingram said:
----------------------------------------
Hi list members, I'm trying to find a program that converts video files to mp3 format. I'm trying to find this until I can buy the songs I want from amazon.
----------------------------------------



<http://www.sendspace.com/folder/i7xwg4>Click here to check out my sendspace offerings!


is there a program that converts video files to mp3 formats?

David Ingram
 

Hi list members, I’m trying to find a program that converts video files to mp3 format.  I’m trying to find this until I can buy the songs I want from amazon.


Re: MathML and PDF files

David Moore
 

Hi,
Thank you so very much. I will read this right now. Have a great one.
 
 

Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 5:43 PM
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files
 

Keep looking. Here’s an example of a blind person who has made a career of mathematics:

https://nfb.org/images/nfb/publications/bm/bm12/bm1207/bm120702.htm

 

From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 5:07 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Hi Brian,

I did all you suggest to get my BS in mathematics and my MA in mathematics education at The Ohio State University. However, when it came to finding employment, my interviewers would shut down as soon as they saw that I was blind. Having two degrees did not seem to matter to employers. They still saw me as a helpless person who would cost the company lots of money. It is hard to get through college as a blind person, but that was nothing for me compared to finding a job. I never did find a job teaching mathematics. I worked in a call center, but they closed down. Hardly any are accessible with JAWS. I tutor math on my own. I am about to start my own JAWS tutoring and math tutoring free help for fun. There are so many blind people out there who have never turned on a computer. I am far way blessed than they are. I will offer my services for nothing, because there is so much to do just to get the blind using a computer and then learning JAWS. You may want to pass this information to your students to get them ready for employment after they finish school. Actually, the more you have to do things on your own in college, the better off you will be on a job. There is no Office for Disabilities at IBM or large company. The Office for Disabilities helped me so much when it came to getting my course work in electric format and all of that, but when I began looking for a job, it was a different world. Most interviewers have never heard of the term “accessibility.” You have to explain that there is JAWS, but you sure cannot use that word. I had to say something like there is software that will make your computer talk. Just saying that made most interviewers sigh and say, “Oh My!!!” The first question I got was, “How can you teach math being blind when you cannot see it yourself?” I just have to say that getting through college was a breeze compared to sitting before an interviewer when trying to find a job. Take care, Brian. I would love to do what you are doing. Have a great one.

 

 

Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 8:56 AM

Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

That point about the time frame was well taken.  I took my terminal Degree in May, 1982, when the IBM pc was a new product, and before TI taught PC’s how to talk.  I remember I had 4 written exams in the fall of 1978, before I could spend full-time working on my dissertation.  Each student had 24 hours to complete his exam, my chair gave me 48, as it had to be done twice.  What I wouldn’t have given for my first XT back then.  I was lucky UK understood.

 

Ted

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 10:03 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Pablo,

         The sad fact is, and I don't say this to be nasty or dismissive but to introduce a reality check, that even with the advances that have been made in accessibility, and there have been many just over the last decade, the world is designed for "the typical" and those with significant disabilities are not "the typical."  This is one of the reasons I try to teach my clients (two of which are, at this time, graduate students) to learn to be their own advocates.  I do not know of a single college student who does not, with pretty much frequency, need to have a sighted reader, particularly for older print material or, as you've found, niche material like mathematical books, etc.  If colleges accept students with disabilities they are expected to provide reasonable accommodations, but very often they have absolutely no idea what that entails.  I have to say that this is not necessarily their fault, either, because students with disabilities are a micro niche and even the disabilities coordinators may be encountering someone with "disability X" or "disability Y" for the first time, ever, and have no idea of what's what.  It is absolutely impossible for any disabilities coordinator to have in-depth knowledge of every disability, or combination of disabilities, they might encounter.  A lot of thinking on one's feet is involved and, very often, taking input from the client as to what they've needed in the past in similar settings.  It's an uphill battle for all involved, including a lot of people who genuinely want to help you.

          If you actually know what you need, and in a situation like this is will probably be a reader, then push to get one.  Once you're in school you will find that "time is of the essence" will take on some real, new meaning even if you are given time accommodations for specific assignments.  You are going to have to figure out what you will require to meet those deadlines and, if it's not already in place, start rattling cages to get it into place as promptly as possible.

          If there is a state department for the blind and visually impaired in your state you would be wise to link up with them for assistance and advocacy.  Even then, you'll still have to sometimes push for what you need.

          I am not trying to be discouraging at all.  You can be a college student and be blind, but your college experience will, by definition, be very different than that of most students and you will need to be thinking about what you need all the time, and trying to anticipate what you might need as your courses change.

          One of the things that's driven me crazy as a JAWS tutor for students is the introduction of web-based course management systems.  These things are great if you can see, and can instantly tell what out of the myriad features your given professor may or may not be using for a given course, but if you can't we know how JAWS reads every blessed thing on a screen, and lots of these screens are chock full of links that aren't used, but remain there as place holders.  I have tried to encourage several local institutions to set up either "sandbox" versions of these systems with fake courses loaded so that those who have to access them with screen readers can have practice, and lots of it, prior to actually needing to use these systems for actual courses (or setting up fake courses in their real systems that they can enroll you in for practice).  The electronic course management system could be an entire semester's class alone, and no one should be trying to learn how to use it while also trying to learn the actual material for a course.

           You can do this, but you will, unquestionably, be working harder to get it done in ways that no one who is not in your situation will ever understand entirely, myself included.

Brian


Re: MathML and PDF files

Adrian Spratt
 

Keep looking. Here’s an example of a blind person who has made a career of mathematics:

https://nfb.org/images/nfb/publications/bm/bm12/bm1207/bm120702.htm

 

From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 5:07 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Hi Brian,

I did all you suggest to get my BS in mathematics and my MA in mathematics education at The Ohio State University. However, when it came to finding employment, my interviewers would shut down as soon as they saw that I was blind. Having two degrees did not seem to matter to employers. They still saw me as a helpless person who would cost the company lots of money. It is hard to get through college as a blind person, but that was nothing for me compared to finding a job. I never did find a job teaching mathematics. I worked in a call center, but they closed down. Hardly any are accessible with JAWS. I tutor math on my own. I am about to start my own JAWS tutoring and math tutoring free help for fun. There are so many blind people out there who have never turned on a computer. I am far way blessed than they are. I will offer my services for nothing, because there is so much to do just to get the blind using a computer and then learning JAWS. You may want to pass this information to your students to get them ready for employment after they finish school. Actually, the more you have to do things on your own in college, the better off you will be on a job. There is no Office for Disabilities at IBM or large company. The Office for Disabilities helped me so much when it came to getting my course work in electric format and all of that, but when I began looking for a job, it was a different world. Most interviewers have never heard of the term “accessibility.” You have to explain that there is JAWS, but you sure cannot use that word. I had to say something like there is software that will make your computer talk. Just saying that made most interviewers sigh and say, “Oh My!!!” The first question I got was, “How can you teach math being blind when you cannot see it yourself?” I just have to say that getting through college was a breeze compared to sitting before an interviewer when trying to find a job. Take care, Brian. I would love to do what you are doing. Have a great one.

 

 

Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 8:56 AM

Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

That point about the time frame was well taken.  I took my terminal Degree in May, 1982, when the IBM pc was a new product, and before TI taught PC’s how to talk.  I remember I had 4 written exams in the fall of 1978, before I could spend full-time working on my dissertation.  Each student had 24 hours to complete his exam, my chair gave me 48, as it had to be done twice.  What I wouldn’t have given for my first XT back then.  I was lucky UK understood.

 

Ted

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 10:03 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Pablo,

         The sad fact is, and I don't say this to be nasty or dismissive but to introduce a reality check, that even with the advances that have been made in accessibility, and there have been many just over the last decade, the world is designed for "the typical" and those with significant disabilities are not "the typical."  This is one of the reasons I try to teach my clients (two of which are, at this time, graduate students) to learn to be their own advocates.  I do not know of a single college student who does not, with pretty much frequency, need to have a sighted reader, particularly for older print material or, as you've found, niche material like mathematical books, etc.  If colleges accept students with disabilities they are expected to provide reasonable accommodations, but very often they have absolutely no idea what that entails.  I have to say that this is not necessarily their fault, either, because students with disabilities are a micro niche and even the disabilities coordinators may be encountering someone with "disability X" or "disability Y" for the first time, ever, and have no idea of what's what.  It is absolutely impossible for any disabilities coordinator to have in-depth knowledge of every disability, or combination of disabilities, they might encounter.  A lot of thinking on one's feet is involved and, very often, taking input from the client as to what they've needed in the past in similar settings.  It's an uphill battle for all involved, including a lot of people who genuinely want to help you.

          If you actually know what you need, and in a situation like this is will probably be a reader, then push to get one.  Once you're in school you will find that "time is of the essence" will take on some real, new meaning even if you are given time accommodations for specific assignments.  You are going to have to figure out what you will require to meet those deadlines and, if it's not already in place, start rattling cages to get it into place as promptly as possible.

          If there is a state department for the blind and visually impaired in your state you would be wise to link up with them for assistance and advocacy.  Even then, you'll still have to sometimes push for what you need.

          I am not trying to be discouraging at all.  You can be a college student and be blind, but your college experience will, by definition, be very different than that of most students and you will need to be thinking about what you need all the time, and trying to anticipate what you might need as your courses change.

          One of the things that's driven me crazy as a JAWS tutor for students is the introduction of web-based course management systems.  These things are great if you can see, and can instantly tell what out of the myriad features your given professor may or may not be using for a given course, but if you can't we know how JAWS reads every blessed thing on a screen, and lots of these screens are chock full of links that aren't used, but remain there as place holders.  I have tried to encourage several local institutions to set up either "sandbox" versions of these systems with fake courses loaded so that those who have to access them with screen readers can have practice, and lots of it, prior to actually needing to use these systems for actual courses (or setting up fake courses in their real systems that they can enroll you in for practice).  The electronic course management system could be an entire semester's class alone, and no one should be trying to learn how to use it while also trying to learn the actual material for a course.

           You can do this, but you will, unquestionably, be working harder to get it done in ways that no one who is not in your situation will ever understand entirely, myself included.

Brian


Re: JAWS really acting badly

Dave...
 

Walt,
 
You are experiencing exactly the same things I have for quite a long while...
 
I have JAWS 17 latest build and a Windows 7 32-bit machine.
 
JAWS 17 does stop itself and reloads at times, usually when the underlying program is not responding. Remember those "xxx (not responding) messages we used to get? Well, no more, now that JAWS 17 just decides on its own to unload and reload. I got very tired of that behavior and have modified one of my JAWS scripts to turn off that behavior. This was suggested by FS and they should by now have a Technical Bulletin on this posted to their site.
 
I don't get a double copy of JAWS, however -- that is a strange one.
 
Adobe Acrobat is not a happy camper with JAWS, in general. I can make Adobe Acrobat lock up JAWS and itself by simply trying to use forms mode to fill out a form. What actually happens, when I have enough patience to observe, is that everything has slowed down to Valium mode. If we wait long enough (let's say, 15 to 30 minutes) JAWS will again pop up to alert that something has gone wrong and you can exit Adobe Acrobat. I don't bother waiting, and even NVDA is not always going to help. I just hit the power button on the PC and wait for a reboot. It is much faster than any other recovery I've tried. I alerted FS to this naughty behavior of Adobe Acrobat and JAWS  when using forms mode, but nothing has resulted yet. So I just never try to fill in forms using Adobe Acrobat.
 
As to Outlook reloading after shutting down, it happens to me 3 out of 4 times. I have Outlook 2003 on a Windows 7 32-bit machine. It has done this since way back in JAWS 12 or so. I just shrug my shoulders, or kick something and just let Outlook reload and then shut it down again.
 
Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: Walt Smith
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 01:23 PM
Subject: JAWS really acting badly

Pardon if this has already been discussed, but I'm new to this list as of today. When I say JAWS, what I'm about to describe is happening with both JAWS 16 and 17, both with all current updates, on a Windows 7 tower with all Microsoft updates applied.
 
First, JAWS periodically and for no apparent reason simply unloads and (usually) reloads itself. I'll be doing something like opening a web site in IE 11 and JAWS just goes silent. After a period that can range from maybe thirty seconds to more than a minute, I'll hear the "JAWS Home Use Edition" message indicating that JAWS is loading again and when this takes place, I can then usually see two entries for JAWS in my System Tray (I've run JAWS from the SysTray for years). Sometimes, though, JAWS simply dies and remains dead and nothing I do, including pressing the hot key combinations that I've set up to load both versions of JAWS will reload the program and I'm totally dead in the water, since even Narrator won't load -- I suspect because of extremely high memory use. This last scenario happened to me just this morning when I was loading a scanned image into the new version of Adobe Acrobat and after I had my sighted wife come in and help me kill Acrobat, JAWS returned *without* reloading as described above.
 
Another issue; and this, I seem to remember, is an oldie; is that when I close Outlook, it frequently doesn't unload and it restarts. I'm currently using Office 2003 with all current MS updates and I know I should upgrade to something more recent because despite the fact that FS continues to supply scripts for this old Office version, whenever I try to report this problem, I'm told bluntly that Office 2003 is no longer supported. Seems that if this is the case, no scripts to use with this version should be supplied any more. Anyhow, I have a very faint recollection that this issue of Outlook failing to shut down when Alt+F4 is pressed goes back several years, but I'm wondering if anyone's seeing this. The ultimate symptom of this failure of Outlook to shut down is that while it doesn't show in the Task Bar, if I open Task Manager and tab over to Processes, it's still running.
 
Much as the thought distresses me, I'm about to the point of making the best backup I can and then reformatting my C-drive and reinstalling Windows 7 in hopes that this may at least help out with the issue of JAWS automatically unloading and reloading itself. When I look at processes running in Task Manager, there are a couple of generic things that are using quite a lot of memory (when I say "generic," I'm referring to processes labeled only svchost.exe for which I can't get further details).
 
If anyone has any wisdom to share on any of this, I'd appreciate feedback as I'm about at my wits' end. Thanks in advance.
 
--
Walt Smith - Clearwater, FL
 


Re: Inaccessibility of virus protection

judith bron
 

I have AVG and it has kept me pretty safe. Being blind is tough but I've seen a lot of folks confronted by a lot worse.

-----Original Message-----
From: Maria Campbell [mailto:lucky1@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:22 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Inaccessibility of virus protection

Another area of great frustration is the inaccessibility of most virus protection programs. Even when one version is accessible, the next version turns out not to be so.
Hey, you all, ain't it a bitch to be blind!


--

Sunny Day
Maria Campbell
lucky1@...

Be patient with God: Be patient with yourself: Be patient with others.


Re: IE 11 with Jaws 17

Jean Menzies <jemenzies@...>
 

Michael,
 
It’s off, but I have no idea if I turned that off or not. So many updates here recently. I resorted to sighted help on this one. Things seem to be ok on other sites, so I’ll just chalk this one up to chance. lol
 

Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 5:18 AM
Subject: Re: IE 11 with Jaws 17
 

I wonder if you have the new smart navigation feature on.  That has been introduced in JAWS 17, and it makes navigating pages different.  You may want to check and see if it is turned on, and if so, disable it for the page you’re referring to.  You can do this by pressing JAWS Key plus V, and then searching for smart navigation.  Good luck!

 

 

From: Jean Menzies [mailto:jemenzies@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: IE 11 with Jaws 17

 

I just upgraded to Windows 10, but I don’t think that’s the issue here. Using Jaws 17 and IE in Windows 10. When I go to a site like the Manage my apple ID page, I am finding it virtually impossible to navigate outside of edit fields. I can’t explain exactly what’s happening, but it’s like I can only read parts of the page, and old arrowing options aren’t working. One thing I remember is that in a combo edit field, the arrow keys actually are inserting numbers. Just strange behaviour all around.

 

IE 11 isn’t new. Jaws 17 is quite new for me, and Windows 10 is brand new. Any ideas what might be going on here?

 

Jean


Re: MathML and PDF files

David Moore
 

Hi Brian,
I did all you suggest to get my BS in mathematics and my MA in mathematics education at The Ohio State University. However, when it came to finding employment, my interviewers would shut down as soon as they saw that I was blind. Having two degrees did not seem to matter to employers. They still saw me as a helpless person who would cost the company lots of money. It is hard to get through college as a blind person, but that was nothing for me compared to finding a job. I never did find a job teaching mathematics. I worked in a call center, but they closed down. Hardly any are accessible with JAWS. I tutor math on my own. I am about to start my own JAWS tutoring and math tutoring free help for fun. There are so many blind people out there who have never turned on a computer. I am far way blessed than they are. I will offer my services for nothing, because there is so much to do just to get the blind using a computer and then learning JAWS. You may want to pass this information to your students to get them ready for employment after they finish school. Actually, the more you have to do things on your own in college, the better off you will be on a job. There is no Office for Disabilities at IBM or large company. The Office for Disabilities helped me so much when it came to getting my course work in electric format and all of that, but when I began looking for a job, it was a different world. Most interviewers have never heard of the term “accessibility.” You have to explain that there is JAWS, but you sure cannot use that word. I had to say something like there is software that will make your computer talk. Just saying that made most interviewers sigh and say, “Oh My!!!” The first question I got was, “How can you teach math being blind when you cannot see it yourself?” I just have to say that getting through college was a breeze compared to sitting before an interviewer when trying to find a job. Take care, Brian. I would love to do what you are doing. Have a great one.
 
 

Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 8:56 AM
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files
 

That point about the time frame was well taken.  I took my terminal Degree in May, 1982, when the IBM pc was a new product, and before TI taught PC’s how to talk.  I remember I had 4 written exams in the fall of 1978, before I could spend full-time working on my dissertation.  Each student had 24 hours to complete his exam, my chair gave me 48, as it had to be done twice.  What I wouldn’t have given for my first XT back then.  I was lucky UK understood.

 

Ted

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 10:03 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Pablo,

         The sad fact is, and I don't say this to be nasty or dismissive but to introduce a reality check, that even with the advances that have been made in accessibility, and there have been many just over the last decade, the world is designed for "the typical" and those with significant disabilities are not "the typical."  This is one of the reasons I try to teach my clients (two of which are, at this time, graduate students) to learn to be their own advocates.  I do not know of a single college student who does not, with pretty much frequency, need to have a sighted reader, particularly for older print material or, as you've found, niche material like mathematical books, etc.  If colleges accept students with disabilities they are expected to provide reasonable accommodations, but very often they have absolutely no idea what that entails.  I have to say that this is not necessarily their fault, either, because students with disabilities are a micro niche and even the disabilities coordinators may be encountering someone with "disability X" or "disability Y" for the first time, ever, and have no idea of what's what.  It is absolutely impossible for any disabilities coordinator to have in-depth knowledge of every disability, or combination of disabilities, they might encounter.  A lot of thinking on one's feet is involved and, very often, taking input from the client as to what they've needed in the past in similar settings.  It's an uphill battle for all involved, including a lot of people who genuinely want to help you.

          If you actually know what you need, and in a situation like this is will probably be a reader, then push to get one.  Once you're in school you will find that "time is of the essence" will take on some real, new meaning even if you are given time accommodations for specific assignments.  You are going to have to figure out what you will require to meet those deadlines and, if it's not already in place, start rattling cages to get it into place as promptly as possible.

          If there is a state department for the blind and visually impaired in your state you would be wise to link up with them for assistance and advocacy.  Even then, you'll still have to sometimes push for what you need.

          I am not trying to be discouraging at all.  You can be a college student and be blind, but your college experience will, by definition, be very different than that of most students and you will need to be thinking about what you need all the time, and trying to anticipate what you might need as your courses change.

          One of the things that's driven me crazy as a JAWS tutor for students is the introduction of web-based course management systems.  These things are great if you can see, and can instantly tell what out of the myriad features your given professor may or may not be using for a given course, but if you can't we know how JAWS reads every blessed thing on a screen, and lots of these screens are chock full of links that aren't used, but remain there as place holders.  I have tried to encourage several local institutions to set up either "sandbox" versions of these systems with fake courses loaded so that those who have to access them with screen readers can have practice, and lots of it, prior to actually needing to use these systems for actual courses (or setting up fake courses in their real systems that they can enroll you in for practice).  The electronic course management system could be an entire semester's class alone, and no one should be trying to learn how to use it while also trying to learn the actual material for a course.

           You can do this, but you will, unquestionably, be working harder to get it done in ways that no one who is not in your situation will ever understand entirely, myself included.

Brian


Re: Jaws with Learning Ally Link

Adrian Spratt
 

A shortcut to the cache-clearing dialog is control-shift-delete.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 4:39 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Jaws with Learning Ally Link

 

Elise,

           I have a client who uses Learning Ally but it's been a while since I was working with her on that page directly.  The suggestion that follows, though, is not specific to the webpage in question.

           Have you ever cleared cache in the web browser you're using?  There can be lots of weird behaviors that suddenly crop up if browser cache becomes corrupted.  If you have not, a web search on the name of the browser you're using, e.g., IE11, and the phrase "clear cache" should turn up any number of step-by-step guides to this task.

           I would try clearing cache and see if the problem mysteriously disappears.  If not, it's on to the next step(s).

Brian


Re: JAWS really acting badly

Adrian Spratt
 

Hi, Walt.

 

An incomplete response, but two points:

 

First, the best way to get JAWS right again is to press insert-Windows key-F4. JAWS will close, but return in a few seconds. I realize this doesn’t solve your underlying problem, but it might reduce frustration.

 

Second, a quick Google search produced the following page with useful information on svchost.exe:

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/what-is-svchostexe-and-why-is-it-running/

 

Your suspicion that this program is responsible for a lot of CPU usage seems justified.

 

From: Walt Smith [mailto:ka3lists@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 4:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: JAWS really acting badly

 

Pardon if this has already been discussed, but I'm new to this list as of today. When I say JAWS, what I'm about to describe is happening with both JAWS 16 and 17, both with all current updates, on a Windows 7 tower with all Microsoft updates applied.

 

First, JAWS periodically and for no apparent reason simply unloads and (usually) reloads itself. I'll be doing something like opening a web site in IE 11 and JAWS just goes silent. After a period that can range from maybe thirty seconds to more than a minute, I'll hear the "JAWS Home Use Edition" message indicating that JAWS is loading again and when this takes place, I can then usually see two entries for JAWS in my System Tray (I've run JAWS from the SysTray for years). Sometimes, though, JAWS simply dies and remains dead and nothing I do, including pressing the hot key combinations that I've set up to load both versions of JAWS will reload the program and I'm totally dead in the water, since even Narrator won't load -- I suspect because of extremely high memory use. This last scenario happened to me just this morning when I was loading a scanned image into the new version of Adobe Acrobat and after I had my sighted wife come in and help me kill Acrobat, JAWS returned *without* reloading as described above.

 

Another issue; and this, I seem to remember, is an oldie; is that when I close Outlook, it frequently doesn't unload and it restarts. I'm currently using Office 2003 with all current MS updates and I know I should upgrade to something more recent because despite the fact that FS continues to supply scripts for this old Office version, whenever I try to report this problem, I'm told bluntly that Office 2003 is no longer supported. Seems that if this is the case, no scripts to use with this version should be supplied any more. Anyhow, I have a very faint recollection that this issue of Outlook failing to shut down when Alt+F4 is pressed goes back several years, but I'm wondering if anyone's seeing this. The ultimate symptom of this failure of Outlook to shut down is that while it doesn't show in the Task Bar, if I open Task Manager and tab over to Processes, it's still running.

 

Much as the thought distresses me, I'm about to the point of making the best backup I can and then reformatting my C-drive and reinstalling Windows 7 in hopes that this may at least help out with the issue of JAWS automatically unloading and reloading itself. When I look at processes running in Task Manager, there are a couple of generic things that are using quite a lot of memory (when I say "generic," I'm referring to processes labeled only svchost.exe for which I can't get further details).

 

If anyone has any wisdom to share on any of this, I'd appreciate feedback as I'm about at my wits' end. Thanks in advance.

 

--

Walt Smith - Clearwater, FL

ka3agm@...

 


Re: Jaws with Learning Ally Link

 

Elise,

           I have a client who uses Learning Ally but it's been a while since I was working with her on that page directly.  The suggestion that follows, though, is not specific to the webpage in question.

           Have you ever cleared cache in the web browser you're using?  There can be lots of weird behaviors that suddenly crop up if browser cache becomes corrupted.  If you have not, a web search on the name of the browser you're using, e.g., IE11, and the phrase "clear cache" should turn up any number of step-by-step guides to this task.

           I would try clearing cache and see if the problem mysteriously disappears.  If not, it's on to the next step(s).

Brian

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