moderated Re: Question regarding either of these options.


Glenn / Lenny
 

Yeah, I'm investigating to see if my Intel NUC 5 PPYH can also take an M.2 SSD, maybe I can get a small one in terms of GB to benefit from faster boot ups and keep the SATA inside too.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 29, 2021 11:18 PM
Subject: Re: Question regarding either of these options.

Hi Glenn,

 

You’re right on target with what your saying. I put my OS on the SSD for faster boot ups  and CPU operations and everything on the HDD. It is almost impossible to recover files on a SSd. So I’d rather losing my OS than important files. Besides, a HDD usually shows signs that it is failing; therefore, you can replace it before that happens, hopefully?   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Monday, March 29, 2021 9:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Question regarding either of these options.

 

If folks are really concerned about writing to their SSD too much, you might consider turning off hibernation, which writes to the SSD/HD whenever your computer hibernates.

Also, you might set your swap file to a fixed size, so the page file isn't constantly changing size.

And if windows still lets you, if you have a secondary drive in your computer, put your pagefile.sys file on the second internal HD drive, so windows isn't constantly writing on the SSD.

You can move your commonly used folders like downloads and documents to a secondary HDD.

There is also a windows feature that I have never used, called super fetch.

If you disable that, it should also help save your SSD from too much writing.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

From: JM Casey

Sent: Monday, March 29, 2021 7:26 PM

Subject: Re: Question regarding either of these options.

 

Sure, but why do it if there’s 0 benefit, and even if it’s slightly detrimental. It’s just a waste of time and resources, and if the oS itself doesn’t provide for it…that’s a pretty good indication.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: March 29, 2021 08:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Question regarding either of these options.

 

As I stated, don't be scared of it, it's not a big deal if it happens a few times.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

From: JM Casey

Sent: Monday, March 29, 2021 7:12 PM

Subject: Re: Question regarding either of these options.

 

Windows 10 does do some automatic defragging. How much, when, and so on, I’m not exactly sure. however I have had this computer since 2017 and never needed to run the utility manually on any of my hdds (they all show 100% not fragmented).

And yes, as has been said, don’t defrag an SSD. Not even sure that Windows 10 native defragger will *let* you do that, though some third party utilities might…just don’t do it.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: March 29, 2021 01:49 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Question regarding either of these options.

 

Albert,

You will always want to do a disk cleanup first, then do a defrag.

The disk cleanup will make space that the defrag will write data onto to make a tighter usage of the disk.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, March 29, 2021 12:38 PM

Subject: Question regarding either of these options.

 

Good afternoon everyone, 

 

Does windows ten, have a utility built into it that will automatically do both a disk defrag, and a disk cleanup on a weekly schedule, or do you have too do it yourself?  If not, which one do you have too do first.  In other words, should I do a disk  defrag first, and then do a disk cleanup second 

 

Thanks in advance, 

 

Al   ? Which one comes first.    

Join main@jfw.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.