moderated Re: having trouble with a web page


Kevin Meyers <kevinmeyers@...>
 

Brian, I totally agree with you about web sites. I even took a class in web development. This gave me a much better idea of what to tell owners of a web site what is wrong and what would help correct the issues. No I’m not an expert and anything helps. What I found during the class is two web sites that work with individuals that are disabled. Neither sites follow the 508C and WCAG standards. One of the sites has links to pages that don’t exist. I tried to help the one site and they didn’t want any input. This site’s web developer has a disability in which he has limitted use of his hands. Soon he won’t be able to use a mouse. I will keep providing my input and hope something happens.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, August 30, 2019 11:22 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: having trouble with a web page

 

On Fri, Aug 30, 2019 at 11:41 AM, The Iowa Gal wrote:

I agree with you about sighted assistance, which is what I finally had to do when I encountered this same situation on a job application. I know exactly what the original poster went through.

As do I.   As a tutor I've frequently encountered new "web objects" for which no conventional interaction techniques, as most of us know them, work.  The nature of the web is such that these will be perpetually being created and screen reader developers will perpetually playing catch-up, at least for the ones that end up lasting.

This is another case where self-advocacy in regard to lack of accessibility is really necessary.   If you (the generic you) do not inform the entities that have this stuff out there that it's posing an accessibility roadblock it is very, very highly unlikely that they will ever know it.   I am not saying it's right that accessibility is not taken into account in many cases, but it is a fact that this occurs, and the smaller the entity the more likely that they have no idea of how to fix that or even consider accessibility.   And even if a given entity has a virtually perfect track record on accessibility, just one change adding one of these objects where extensive regression testing focused on accessibility was not performed can allow it to get out there.  No one can fix what they don't know is broken, and if they're unaware of accessibility issues as part of design, you can bring that to their attention for the first time.

But, if time is of the essence, get sighted help or try to get the HR folks from the place you're applying on the phone.  One way or another there will likely be a way to get an application completed even if that means intervention by someone else to "fill in the blanks" while things are still inaccessible.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

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