moderated Re: One space between each sentence, they said. Science just proved them wrong. was RE: Esoteric punctuation question.


JM Casey
 

Hi Brian and All.

Sorry, buti am just getting to this message now, and I think the topic has basicallyb een closed, but I didn’t want to not convey at least some understanding of Brian’s excellent explanation.

I’ve never seen a thing in my life and am a braille user, but I do understand the “unbridgable gulf” mentioned here pretty well anyway, at least in theory. Though I couldn’t really tell you what most specific fonts actually look like in practice, typography is certainly interesting, and I’ve worked with a few different ones in my time for different purposes. This is something a braille reader just has to accept as part of the print experience we will never really and truly have an equivalent for, but, just like cinematography in film, it’s a very interesting “science” that it’s useful to know some things about.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 20, 2019 9:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: One space between each sentence, they said. Science just proved them wrong. was RE: Esoteric punctuation question.

 

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 05:51 PM, JM Casey wrote:

But when you read a book in print, you don’t (usually) see two spaces after a period, correct?

That depends, at least from a "how it looks" perspective, on the type used.  It certainly appears that either some use a 2-space convention or the type itself has a somewhat wider space.

When it comes to proportional fonts some "compress" a space far more than others do, but all compress it in comparison to "wide" letters like M and W, for instance.

I wish there were a way to convey this in a truly meaningful way for those that cannot see.   The differences between fonts, in many respects, that are all proportional fonts can be radical.   For those here who may have once been able to see, think about the difference between how a True Type font such as Vivaldi or Palace Script look when compared with Times New Roman.   Even though both can be read with relative ease, when the content is short, try to imagine reading an entire book in one of the first two script fonts as opposed to Times New Roman.  I'd be exhausted by the end of the first page, because letter form matters, and matters a lot, when ease of visual scanning and processing are involved.   There are an awful lot of fonts that were developed to be "visually interesting" for things like posters, invitations, and the like but are not ever intended to be used for article or book length material for publication and reading by the masses.   Any of these being machine read, or converted for Braille displays, are exactly the same in those contexts.   There's a gulf that cannot be fully bridged due to sensory modalities at play and the fact that, in the case of Braille, the whole idea of font as I experience it is absent.
 
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Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

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