Re: Processor speed


Joseph Norton
 

There are certainly things to be aware of when using “fast startup”.

 

Fast startup is similar to hibernation, but, when it is enabled, the state of Windows kernel is saved in the hibernation file, not in ram.

 

So, when you shutdown with fast startup enabled, Windows logs all users out and returns to a state similar to when Windows is first booted up, no users logged in.  Then, it saves that state to the hibernation file.

 

Here is an article on HowToGeek explaining more about the pros and cons of fast startup.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/243901/the-pros-and-cons-of-windows-10s-fast-startup-mode/

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Steve Nutt
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 4:03 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Hi,

 

I don’t recommend fast startup in any situation to be honest.  It stores the computer’s state completely in RAM and tries to bring it back, that’s how it starts up fast.  More often than not though, it corrupts what’s in memory, so you have to reboot anyway, that’s my experience.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Feliciano G
Sent: 04 February 2019 01:11
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Michael,

Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

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