Re: a big cursor problem


Mike B. <mike9902@...>
 


Hi Sieghard,
 
You would be surprised how much screen resolution can change how Jaws reads windows.  Below is some screen resolution information.
Simple explanation:
It is usually quoted as width × height, with the units in pixels: for example, "1024 × 768" means the width is 1024 pixels and the height is 768 pixels.
This example would normally be spoken as "ten twenty-four by seven sixty-eight" or "ten twenty-four by seven six eight".
 

 The most important thing is not the monitor size, but its ability to display the higher resolution images. The higher you set the resolution, the smaller
the images on the screen will be, and there comes a point at which the text on the screen becomes so small it’s not readable. On a larger monitor it is
possible to push the resolution very high indeed, but if that monitor’s pixel density is not up to par, you won’t get the maximum possible resolution before
the image becomes unreadable. In many cases the monitor will not display anything at all, if you tell Windows to use a resolution the monitor cannot handle.
In other words, don’t expect miracles out of a cheap monitor. When it comes to high-definition displays, you definitely get what you pay for.
 
 
 
 
Screen resolution? Aspect ratio? What do 720p, 1080p, 1440p, 4K and 8K mean?
article
Tutorial by Codrut Neagu
 published on 05/20/2016      
Screen resolution
 
 In days gone by, screen resolution (also called display resolution) wasn’t much of an issue. Windows came with a few preset options and to get higher
resolution or more colors (or both) you would install a driver for your video card. As time went on, you could choose better video cards and better monitors
as well. Today we have lots of options when it comes to displays, their quality and the supported resolutions. In this article I would like to take you
through a bit of history and explain all the important concepts, including common acronyms like 1080p or 4K.
 
 It all started with IBM & CGA
 
 The color graphics technology was first developed by IBM. CGA was first, followed by EGA and VGA - color graphics adapter, enhanced graphics adapter,
video graphics array. Regardless of the capability of your monitor, you’d still have to choose from one of the few options available through your graphics
card’s drivers. For the sake of nostalgia, here’s a look at a once well-known CGA display. 
 
screen, resolution, display, aspect, ratio, size, 1080p, 720p, 1080i, 1440p, 4K, 8K
 
 With the advent of high definition video and the increased popularity of the 16:9 aspect ratio (we’ll explain more about aspect ratios in a bit) selecting
a screen resolution is not the simple affair it once was. However, this also means that there are a lot more options to choose from, with something to
suit almost everyone’s preferences. Let’s look at what today’s terminology is, and what it means:
 
 The screen is what by what?
 
 I am sure some of you already know that the term "resolution" isn’t correct when it’s used to refer to the number of pixels on a screen. That says nothing
about how densely the pixels are clustered. "Resolution" is technically the number of pixels per unit of area, rather than the total number of pixels.
Here, we’ll be using the term as it’s commonly understood, rather than the absolutely technologically correct usage.
 
 Since the beginning, resolution has been described (accurately or not) by the number of pixels arranged horizontally and vertically on a monitor, for
example 640 x 480 = 307200 pixels. The choices available were determined by the capability of the video card, and they differed from manufacturer to manufacturer.
 

 The resolutions built into Windows were very limited, so if you didn’t have the driver for your video card you’d be stuck with the lower-resolution screen
that Windows provided. If you’ve watched Windows Setup or installed a newer version of a video driver, you may have seen the 640 x 480 low resolution screen
for a moment or two. It was ugly even on CGA screens, but that was the Windows default.
 
 As monitor quality improved, Windows began offering a few more built-in options, but the burden was still mostly on the graphics card manufacturers, especially
if you wanted a really high resolution display. The more recent versions of Windows can detect the default screen resolution for your monitor and graphics
card and adjust accordingly. This doesn’t mean that what Windows chooses is always the best option, but it will work, and you can change it if you wish,
after you see what it looks like. If you need guidance on doing that, check this tutorial:
Change your display's screen resolution and make text and icons bigger.
 
screen, resolution, display, aspect, ratio, size, 1080p, 720p, 1080i, 1440p, 4K, 8K
 
 Mind your P’s and I’s
 
 You may have seen the screen resolution described as something like 720p or 1080i. What does that mean?
 
 To begin with, the letters tell you how the picture is "painted" on the monitor. A "p" stands for  progressive , and an "i" stands for  interlaced .
 
 The  interlaced scan is a holdover from television and from early CRT monitors. The monitor or TV screen has lines of pixels arranged horizontally across
it. The lines were fairly easy to see if you got up close to an older monitor or TV, but nowadays the pixels on the screen are so small that they are very
hard to see even with magnification. The monitor’s electronics "paint" each screen line by line, too quickly for the eye to see. An interlaced display
paints all the odd lines first, then all the even lines.
empty complementary information
 Since the screen is being painted in alternate lines, flicker has always been a problem with interlaced scans. Manufacturers have tried to overcome this
problem in various ways. The most common way is to increase the number of times a complete screen is painted in a second, which is called the  refresh
rate. The most common refresh rate was 60 times per second, which was acceptable for most people, but it could be pushed a bit higher to get rid of the
flicker that some people perceived.
 
 As people moved away from the older CRT displays, the terminology changed from  refresh rate to  frame rate , because of the difference in the way the
LED monitor works. The  frame rate is the speed with which the monitor displays each separate frame of data. The most recent versions of Windows set the
framerate at 60 Hertz, or 60 cycles per second, and LED screens do not flicker. And the system changed from  interlaced scan to  progressive scan because
the new digital displays were so much faster. In a progressive scan, the lines are painted on the screen in sequence rather than first the odd lines and
then the even lines. If you want to translate 1080p for example, is used for displays that are characterized by 1080 horizontal lines of vertical resolution
and a progressive scan.
 
 There’s a rather eye-boggling illustration of the differences between progressive and interlaced scans on Wikipedia here:
Progressive scan.
For another interesting history lessons, read also
Interlaced video.
 
 What about the numbers: 720p, 1080p, 1440p, 4K and 8K?
 
 When high-definition TVs became the norm, manufacturers developed a shorthand to explain their display resolution. The most common numbers you will see
are 720p, 1080p and 2160p or 4K. As we’ve seen, the "p" and "i" tell you whether it’s a progressive-scan or interlaced-scan display. And these shorthand
numbers are sometimes used to describe computer monitors as well, even though in general a monitor is capable of a higher-definition display than a TV.
The number always refers to the number of horizontal lines on the display.
 
 Here’s how the shorthand translates:
 
list of 5 items
•  720p = 1280 x 720 - is usually known as HD or “HD Ready” resolution
•  1080p = 1920 x 1080 - is usually known as FHD or “Full HD” resolution
•  1440p = 2560 x 1440 - commonly known as QHD or Quad HD resolution, and typically seen on gaming monitors and on high-end smartphones. 1440p is  four
times the resolution of 720p HD or “HD ready”.
•  2160p = 3840 x 2160 - commonly known as 4K, UHD or Ultra HD resolution. It’s a very large display resolution and it’s found on high-end TVs and monitors.
2160p is called 4K because it offers  four times the resolution of 1080p FHD or “Full HD”.
•  4320p = 7680 x 4320 - is known as 8K and it offers 16 times more pixels than the regular 1080p FHD or “Full HD” resolution. Although you’re not going
to see TVs or computer monitors with this resolution too soon, you can test whether your computer can render such a large amount of data. Here’s an 8K
video sample:
list end
 
 What is the Aspect Ratio?
 
 At the beginning we mentioned the term aspect ratio. This was originally used in motion pictures, indicating how wide the picture was in relation to its
height. Movies were originally in 4:3 aspect ratio, and this carried over into television and early computer displays. Motion picture aspect ratio changed
much more quickly to a wider screen, which meant that when movies were shown on TV they had to be cropped or the image manipulated in other ways to fit
the TV screen.
 
 As display technology improved, TV and monitor manufacturers began to move toward widescreen displays as well. Originally "widescreen" referred to anything
wider than the common 4:3 display, but it quickly came to mean a 16:10 ratio and later 16:9. Nowadays, nearly all computer monitors and TVs are only available
in widescreen, and TV broadcasts and web pages have adapted to match.
 
 Until 2010, 16:10 was the most popular aspect ratio for widescreen computer displays. But with the rise in popularity of high definition televisions,
which were using high definition resolutions such as 720p and 1080p and made this terms synonyms with high-definition, 16:9 has become the high-definition
standard aspect ratio.Today, finding 16:10 displays is almost impossible.
 
 Depending on the aspect ratio of your display, you are able to use only resolutions that are specific to its width and height. Some of the most common
resolutions that can be used for each aspect ratio are the following:
 
list of 3 items
•  4:3 aspect ratio resolutions: 640×480, 800×600, 960×720, 1024×768, 1280×960, 1400×1050, 1440×1080 , 1600×1200, 1856×1392, 1920×1440, and 2048×1536.
 
•  16:10 aspect ratio resolutions: - 1280×800, 1440×900, 1680×1050, 1920×1200 and 2560×1600.
•  16:9 aspect ratio resolutions: 1024×576, 1152×648, 1280×720, 1366×768, 1600×900, 1920×1080, 2560×1440 and 3840×2160.
list end
 
 How does the size of the screen affect resolution?
 
 Although a 4:3 TV’s display can be adjusted to show black bars at the top and bottom of the screen while a widescreen movie or show is being displayed,
this doesn’t make sense with a monitor, so you’ll find that Windows will not even offer you the widescreen display as a choice. You can watch movies with
black bars as if you were watching a TV screen, but this is done by your media player.
 
 The most important thing is not the monitor size, but its ability to display the higher resolution images. The higher you set the resolution, the smaller
the images on the screen will be, and there comes a point at which the text on the screen becomes so small it’s not readable. On a larger monitor it is
possible to push the resolution very high indeed, but if that monitor’s pixel density is not up to par, you won’t get the maximum possible resolution before
the image becomes unreadable. In many cases the monitor will not display anything at all, if you tell Windows to use a resolution the monitor cannot handle.
In other words, don’t expect miracles out of a cheap monitor. When it comes to high-definition displays, you definitely get what you pay for.
 
 Conclusion
 
 If you are not very technical, it is very likely that you are confused by so many technicalities. Hopefully this article has managed to help in your understanding
of the most important characteristics of a display: aspect ratio, resolutions or type.
article end
Take care.  Go Rams!
Sent from my iBarstool.
I type out everything I want to remember. That way instead of spending a lot of time trying to remember what it was, I spend the time looking for where I saved it!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, November 19, 2018 8:14 AM
Subject: Re: a big cursor problem

And, in case it helps Jed, I just had a look at the screen resolution on my laptop which has the 4K Touch Screen display and noticed that scaling was set to 250% which also was the recommended setting. I am pretty sure I had tried to set the resolution lower before without fixing the Roboform issue, but this time I set the scaling to 100% and that fixed it. I don't know how that makes a difference visually, but my wife has her own login and I'm pretty sure these settings are specific to the user account so unless she is trying to help me with something and it looks horrible this solution works for me. Here is the exact wording from Jaws speech history:

 

Scale and layout
Change the size of text, apps, and other items Combo box
100%
To change the selection use the Arrow keys.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of george b
Sent: Monday, November 19, 2018 5:03 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: a big cursor problem

 

Go to your desktop and press control plus spacebar and you will hear not selected

Now press shift plus f10 and choose display in the menu

 

Now look in there for screen resolution and you need to have 1200 /800 or less for jaws to work well

 

Test a couple of those choices to you find the one that works best.

 

hth

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Horspool
Sent: November 19, 2018 4:36
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: a big cursor problem

 

Hi Jed,

It's possibly a screen resolution issue, and I can't remember exactly where the setting is but it will be under "Display", and try lowering the resolution quite substantially.

Failing that though, if you know the cursor is jumping up a few rows, can't you just DownArrow a few times until it's back where it needs to be?

Matthew

 

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jed Barton
Sent: 18 November 2018 20:46
To: main <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: a big cursor problem

 

Hey guys,

 

OK, i'm having a very strange problem, that i need some help with.

Noone can seem to come up with the anser, but it's driving me crazy.

I use a program to program radios called contact manager.  The long and short of it is, i have to add channels to a particular zone in the radio.  I can access the zones and the channels.  I can get to the zone in the radio, and access the channels that i need to add.  The way i did it in the past on my old laptop, i go to the channel that i want to add, route jaws to pc, and do a right mouse click.  Now when i route the jaws to PC, if you're looking at it visually on the screen, the cursor jumps up several places on the screen and as a result it highlights the wrong channel.  This never use to happen on my other laptop. I'm running the same version of the software as well as the same version  of jaws on both machines, both running win 10.  I can't think of anything that would make this happen.

Today, we shut down jaws, and i had someone just do a right mouse click on the right channel, and the cursor didn't jump up several places, it highlighted the correct channel.  Any ideas here guys?

 

Thanks,

Jed

 

 

 

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