moderated Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Dale Alton <blinkydale@...>
 

Thank you Dave. Once I went with remainder and not decimal, bingo bango

Denver Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 9:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

remainder, not decimal, Dale. Use even division and note the remainder.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Dale Alton" <blinkydale@comcast.net>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 19:33
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


I must be some thing wrong. Take November 23, 2018.
The formula I come up with is: 17+4+6+23=68, 68/7=9.7. If Sunday is 0 and
Monday is 1 where is 7?

Denver Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Chaffin
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 6:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Hello Mario,

As far as step 1 and why you use 17, You just use one number less than the
last 2 digits of the year. So since that was 18, you would use the number
17. So if you were looking at a date with the year 2020, then you would use
19. Again, one less than the last 2 digits of the year.

Now, as far as step 3, you basically add 3 for each month that has 31 days,
2 for each month that has 30 days, and 1 for February if it has 29 days.
Now you only count the months up to the month with the date you are looking
for. For example, if your date is in May, then you would do this for
January through April. If your date is in October, then you would do this
for January through September.
And finally, you would add the days in the month up to the date you are
looking for. For example, if your date is the 13th of the month, then you
would add 13, if your date is the 25th, then you would add 25.

Now step 4 is just the result from adding the numbers from step 3. Step 3
was the instructions, and step 4 is the calculation of step 3.

Step 5 is just doing the final calculation. The important part of the
calculation is the remainder. In the example given, the remainder was 2, so
that is what determined the day of the week.
For all calculations, if your remainder is 0 then your day is Sunday, 1 then
Monday, 2 then Tuesday, and so on.

Hope this has been helpful.

Chris


On May 13, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

I always wondered how some individuals can do this. but can someone
clearly explain it to me step by step because I don't follow how it's
done. yes, it is written, but I just don't understand like in step 1,
why do you arrive at using 17 and not 18? is it because 2018 is not an
odd year? and for step 3 and 4, I am lost.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dave... [mailto:dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 7:33 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?

Clever and ingenious.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: inamuddin khan
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 16:26
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?


Suppose, you don’t have anything computer, cell phone or any kind of
calendar, are you not able to tell the day of the week of any date?

Let me tell you how you can do it!

Suppose your date is 12/25/2018.

1.

Take 17 that is 17 years of 21st century.

2.

Take 4 meaning that from year 1 to year 17, there are 4 leap years.

3.

Take 3 from the months which have 31 days, 2 from the months which have
30 days and take 1 from the month which have 29 days.

4.

From that calculations, there are 6 months having 31 days meaning 18
days, 4 months having 30 days meaning 8 days and take 25 days from
December.

5.

Now final calculation is:

17+4+18+8+25=72 divided by 7=10 remaining 2.

6.

Now you can count them as, Sunday 0 Monday 1 and Tuesday 2.

So December 25 2018 will be Tuesday!

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 9:49 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Actually, if you want to know what day a particular date is, just type
the date in a cell, e.g. in A1 type 12/24/2018, then press Control+1 to
format the cell and select the date format, then from the available
options select the one that has the weekday included (for me it’s the
second from the top).

If, for example, I enter 12/25/2018 into A1 and then apply that format,
it will read “Tuesday, December 25, 2018” so I now know that Christmas
day this year is on a Tuesday.

Now, if I want to know how many days it is until Christmas from today
(May 11), I type 5/11/2018 into cell A2, then in cell A3 I subtract the
larger date (Christmas) from the smaller date (today), so I put =A1-A2
and the result in this case will be 228 which is the correct number of
days from May 11 until December 25.



the day



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2018 6:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi,

Following is a formula to calculate the day of the week from an input
date.

In the first cell, in this case A4, type in 3/12/1988 and the cell with
the formula will display the week day.



=TEXT(A4,"dddd")



Depending on where you live and the date format, you may need to change
the formula a little. This formula works on 3 December 1988 and not
December 12 format. But then it may not need to be altered at all.
You’ll just need to experiment.



HTH

Tom











From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kevin
Minor
Sent: Saturday, 12 May 2018 9:31 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Where can I learn about formulas for Excel?



Hi.



I’m looking for a source to learn about the different formulas for
Excel. I purchased the book that CathyAnne Murtha wrote, but it doesn’t
contain all the formulas that I’m looking for. Essentially, I’d like a
kind of Excel for Dummies where all the formulas are listed and how they
work. As an example, I’d like to know how to have Excel tell me the day
of the week a date will be. Also, I’d like to know how many days are
between dates. I looked through the book I got from Ms. Murtha, but it
doesn’t list all the formulas.



Thanks for any help. Dates aren’t the only thing I’m looking for. I
know Excel is a very powerful program, and I’d like to learn how to use
it to its fullest potential.



Thanks for any info.



Have a blessed day and don’t work too hard.

Kevin Minor and the amazing Jilly, Lexington, KY








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