Re: JAWS and Wi-Fi___33-Enabled Amplifier


Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

In case you care, they’re also controllable through Echo.

 

Ted

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 4:33 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: JAWS and Wi-Fi___33-Enabled Amplifier

 

I totally agree with Randy, if you already have in-ceiling or in-wall speakers the Sonos Connect Amp is exactly what you want. The only situation where it might not be the best choice is if somebody has a lot of external sources like a CD Player, tape deck, turn table etc. I know most tape decks have long since been disconnected and turn tables are probably more rare than they are common, but some still use them. If all you have is a CD player then the Connect Amp does have 1 set of analogue RCA inputs.

 

I recently wrote a lengthy post about Sonos and I think it was on this list, you can probably find it in the archive. The Connect Amp connects to your WiFi, it has a 110 watts Class D amplifier and it can play music from just about every imagineable paid music subscription as well as from Tune In and iHeart Radio. Support for paid subscriptions includes Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker, Tidal, Pandora and much more.

The Connect Amp itself has only a play/pause button and a volume rocker, it has the RCA input and a set of speaker outputs. There is also a set of ethernet ports so if you wanted you could wire it to your router, the second ethernet port is just an output so you wouldn't loose a router port. There is also a port if you have a powered subwover to plug that in.

Apart from all the internet music you can play your own digital music if you have it on your computer, ideal is saving it on a network attached hard drive as Sonos can access it and you can always play your music whether your computer is on or not.

You control the Sonos system via an iPhone or Android app and there is also a Windows app which works pretty well with Jaws. The iOS app is super accessible, I don't have an Android phone so can't speak for that.

The nice thing about Sonos is that you can continue to add players over time, if you later want to put one of their portable speakers elsewhere, you can buy either a Play 1, Play 3 or Play 5 and do this, any of these can also be set up as a stereo pair and if you have one of them in the kitchen but plan a barbecue outside you can just unplug it, plug it in outside and as long as it is in range of your WiFi you have music outside.

. There is also a a wireless Sonos Sub available which is $700 but amazing for that price. Lastly, you can set upa 5.1 system in your living room with a Sonos Playbar (a soundbar for underneath your TV), a Sonos Sub and a set of Play 1 or Play 3 speakers which in this setup become the rear speakers.

If you have multiple Sonos speakers/players you can set them up individually or in groups of 2 or more. You can of course play different things on all of them or group all of them together and play the same music everywhere in the house.

There are even apps for iOS and probably Android which allow you to use your iPhone and Sonos sytem as a PA system, you just open the app, select the speaker or group of speakers you ant and then tap talk and speak into your phone. What you say will be broadcast through your Sonos system with maybe a half second delay.

You can read more at www.Sonos.com, if you order directly you get free shippng, excellent customer service and a generous 45-day return period. Use it for up to 6 weeks and if you don't like it call them up and they'll give you an RA number and I think they even pay for the shipping back, but I'm not sure if they still do. I think if you look for reviews you'll find few bad ones.

One last thing, Sonos is not Airplay capable by itself. If you want to Airplay from an iPhone or iPad to Sonos you have to buy an Airport Express and hook it up to one of the Sonos components which has an input like the Sonos Connect Amp, Connect or Play 5. The Play 1 and Play 3 have no inputs and none of the Sonos components have a 3.5mm headphone jack.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 9:45 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: JAWS and Wi-Fi___33-Enabled Amplifier

 

Its pricey but the Sonos amp is what you are looking for it can play music from the internet or your PC or phone  has a analog input The PC and phone software is totally accessible. I have The play One, Play 3, Connect and connect amp and they all sound really good and like I said are totally compatible with Jaws and VO and I would think other screen readers as well.
On 5/17/2017 12:25 AM, Marquette, Ed wrote:

All:

I’ll ask my question first and then explain.

Is there such a thing as a WI-FI-enabled Amplifier that acts, for instance, like a Wi-Fi-enabled printer and that has a software-based control panel accessible using JAWS?

 

Now, for the reason for that question.  Several years back, we had an expensive set of wired speakers installed, during a remodeling job, in the ceiling and walls of a very large room in our home.  Apart from the uneasy relationship between JAWS and iTunes and Bluetooth connectivity challenges, I can sometimes play music on my laptop through the above-described amplification system.

The challenge is that Bluetooth is inherently flakey, and the amplifier is 100% inaccessible.  I have to guess to determine whether it is in Bluetooth reception mode.  Plus, it drops the pairing frequently, and pairing is a nightmare.  In addition, for Bluetooth even to work, one must keep the laptop and the amplifier in relatively close proximity to each other.

A Wi-Fi -enabled amplifier would simply appear on the network, like a printer.  An accessible control panel on the laptop would allow the amplifier to be controlled over the Wi-Fi network just the way one controls various functions of a Wi-Fi-enabled printer.

I’ve tried searching the Internet for “accessible amplifiers” and the like, but I’ve come up empty.

That such a device should exist seems obvious, but …

Of course, even if it does, there is a good chance that the control panel would be inaccessible. 

 

I. Edward Marquette

Direct Dial:  816.502.4646

Mobile:  816.812.0088

Google Voice:  408.692.5640

Facsimile:  816.960.0041

Kutak Rock LLP

2300 Main Street, Suite 800

Kansas City, MO 64108

ed.marquette@...

 

 

 

 


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