Re: JAWS 13 & Web Site Navigation


Dave Mitchell
 

Hi, Your suggestions and those of Ed are helpful and instructive but upon further review and experimentation, perhaps my frustration lies within the vagaries of JAWS itself. For example, I have had recent success by closing out a site when JAWS is maddeningly slow and then returning to the site for a second try. I have no idea why JAWS misbehaves in the first place but when the screen reader is working responsively, the navigation techniques mentioned by you and Ed all produce results or relevant feedback. Go figure. Mitch

"As we know, there are known knowns. There are things we know we know. We
also know there are known unknowns. That is to say we know there are some
things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns, the ones we
don't know we don't know." ~ Donald Rumsfeld [former Secretary of Defense

----- Original Message -----
From: "Adrian Spratt" <Adrian@AdrianSpratt.com>
To: "'The Jaws for Windows support list.'" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 7:37 AM
Subject: RE: JAWS 13 & Web Site Navigation


Hi, Mitch.

Ed's list of navigation keys includes three I've never used and look forward
to testing. I have a few suggestions along other lines.

Lately I've noticed a pattern where the article's header is followed by one
or more groups of links. One group might be a list of Twitter and other
feeds. Another group might be a list of related items. With this in mind,
when I'm on an unfamiliar website, the first trick I try is to press h until
I arrive at the heading for the article (typically the same heading as the
one for the entire page), then n (for skip group of links) one or more times
until I land in text. It doesn't always work, but it does often enough to
make it a good first attempt.

On newspaper websites, there's often a "print" link that takes you to the
same article but on a less cluttered page. It has the added advantage of
placing the entire article on a single webpage instead of having it broken
up into two or more parts.

NFB Newsline makes available uncluttered versions of articles from
newspapers around the country. I found signing up for this service annoying,
but NFB's customer service is helpful and, once the process is completed,
the service can be useful, though far from perfect.

This is how I now manage the New York Times, a paper that could take up my
entire day if I just relied on the NFB version. I subscribe to the NY Times'
daily email in which they give you the headlines and one-sentence synopses
of that day's stories in as many sections as you choose, ranging from
politics to sports, business to the arts. Each headline contains a link to
the online article. The email service is useful because it tells you what
the Times' editors deem the most important three stories in each category.
However, I find it time-consuming to keep going online for each article that
interests me. So I first load the NFB's copy of the Times into IE. Whenever
the Times email alerts me to an article of interest, I go to the NFB
version, already loaded in IE, and search for the headline. This process has
speeded up my reading of the Times considerably.

-----Original Message-----
From: jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com]
On Behalf Of Dave Mitchell
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 8:59 AM
To: Jaws List
Subject: JAWS 13 & Web Site Navigation

Greetings: I am using the latest JAWS 13, Internet Explorer and XP Home.
As time goes by, it seems web sites of all types are getting more cluttered
in an inverse proportion to my ability to quickly navigate them for the
relevant text.
I don't know what is happening on the screen and am wondering if others have
tips or tricks to quickly find text while overcoming the sluggishness of
JAWS.
The only quick navigation key I use and one that often worked well in the
past was the 'N' key. Perhaps other impediments such as flash, etc. may be
at work here but it's all guess work for me.
I cannot at the moment list a specific web site for you all but, as I
mentioned, it seems that most newspaper sites are becoming tedious and
hopefully others have some hints for me to try.
Thanks for reading, Mitch
"With the possible exception of the equator, everything begins somewhere."
Peter Robert Fleming


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com

Join main@jfw.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.